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I got a tutorial about using a button for switching some images, and here is the code

public class MainActivity extends AppCompatActivity {
private static ImageView andro;
private static Button buttonswitch;

int current_image_index = 0;
int[] images = {R.mipmap.andro_img,R.mipmap.apple_image,R.mipmap.ic_launcher,R.mipmap.ic_launcher_round};
@Override
protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
    setContentView(R.layout.activity_main);
    buttonClick();
}
public void buttonClick() {
    andro = (ImageView) findViewById(R.id.imageView);
    buttonswitch = (Button) findViewById(R.id.button);
    buttonswitch.setOnClickListener(
            new View.OnClickListener() {
                @Override
                public void onClick(View view) {
                    current_image_index++;
                    current_image_index = current_image_index % images.length;
                    andro.setImageResource(images[current_image_index]);
                }
            }
    );
}
}

I got really confused in this part :

 @Override
            public void onClick(View view) {
                current_image_index++;
                current_image_index = current_image_index % images.length;
                andro.setImageResource(images[current_image_index]);

What I understand is that once I click the button, then the int current_image_index will increase by 1. Then modulus current_image_index with the images.length which will have the remainder of current_image_index divide by the image.length. For example, for the first time I will have current_image_index = 0, then once clicked, it will be 1, then current_image_index % image.length = 0. Then andro.setImageResource(images[0]);

this will repeated again and again since the current_image_index stays to be 0. Then how can the picture changes constantly once it is clicked since the current_image_index%image.length will always give a result of 0.

  • 2
    You say "it will be 1, then current_image_index % image.length = 0". This is incorrect; image.length is 4, so current_image_index 0 gives 0, 1 gives 1, 2 gives 2, 3 gives 3 then 4 gives 0, thus you get your wrapping round. – Ken Y-N Jun 27 '17 at 4:00
  • It's incrementing the image counter. Instead of them using a conditional to check if you've gone past the, the modulo value automatically resets to zero once you've gone past the end. – Fhaab Jun 27 '17 at 4:03
  • Basic Mathematics - answer of a%b is always <b. Incrementing by 1 and taking modulus ensures that the increased value forms a valid index for the array. – GAURANG VYAS Jun 27 '17 at 4:04
  • I think you don't understand what modulo is doing. 1 modulo 5, for example, is 1, not 0. – Fhaab Jun 27 '17 at 4:06
  • @KenY-N why 1 gives 1 ? 2 gives 2 ? And so on... Isnt that modulo is the remainder of division ? – Anthony Lauly Jun 27 '17 at 6:03
1

...since the current_image_index%image.length will always give a result of 0.

Not quite correct.

The modulus operator (%) calculates the remainder of two operands. It is a sort of repeated subtraction. In fact, with a % b you'll ask yourself:

What number remains if I repeat subtracting b from a until that operation is no longer possible?

Let us test it with 8 % 3 (so a = 8 and b = 3).

  • Can I subtract 3 from 8? Yes, result is 5.
  • Can I subtract 3 from 5? Yes, result is 2.
  • Can I subtract 3 from 2? No, our final result is 2.

Logically, the operation a % b with result r always results in 0 <= r < b.

Examples:
5 % 2 = 1 (because 4 ÷ 2 = 2 and the remainder is 1)
17 % 6 = 5 (because 12 ÷ 6 = 2 and the remainder is 5)

So in your case, the array index is always at least 0 and at most images.length - 1. And that's exactly the valid range of your array.

Suppose you have 3 images, thus images.length is 3. Also current_image_index is initialized to 0. So you'll see image[0] at the beginning.

  1. You click once, so current_image_index is incremented to 1. Then, the modulus operation is applied: 1 % 3 = 1.
  2. You click again, so current_image_index is incremented to 2. Then, the modulus operation is applied: 2 % 3 = 2.
  3. You click again, so current_image_index is incremented to 3. Then, the modulus operation is applied: 3 % 3 = 0. That means the index reached 3, but then was immediately reset to 0 by the modulus operator.

So after image[2], image[0] is shown. You see that indices starting at 0 instead of 1 is working in our benefit now.

0

current_image_index % images.length works as a module.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modulo_operation

So I think we both a agree 1/2 = 0 R 1.

And modulo in every programming language means simply take the remainder of the division and return it as the result of the operation.

So 1 ‰ 2 = 1 and not zero.

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