6

Lets say I have an array

a = np.arange(16).reshape((4,4))

0   1  2   3
4   5  6   7
8   9  10  11
12  13 14  15

But I want

15  11  7  3
14  10  6  2
13  9   5  1
12  8   4  0

which is a flip across the secondary diagonal, or a kind of anti-transpose.

How can I do this in numpy?

  • Have you attempted anything or are you simply getting your homework done by us... – Vaibhav Bajaj Jun 27 '17 at 4:58
  • @VaibhavBajaj self-answered question – Antti Haapala Jun 27 '17 at 5:05
  • @AnttiHaapala :O Oops. Didn't see that. – Vaibhav Bajaj Jun 27 '17 at 5:06
5

One could do one of the following:

rot90(a,2).T

rot90(flipud(a),1)

rot90(fliplr(a), -1)

or as hpaulj suggested in the comments (thanks hpaulj)

a[::-1,::-1].T

Here are the speed rankings as ratios of the slowest method after anti-transposing 1000 random 10000x10000 arrays.

  1. 63.5% - a[::-1,::-1].T
  2. 85.6% - rot90(a,2).T
  3. 97.8% - rot90(flipud(a),1)
  4. 100% -rot90(fliplr(a),-1)
  • I'm hoping someone knows a secret numpy way of doing this. – Jaden Travnik Jun 27 '17 at 4:51
  • 4
    a[::-1,::-1].T; this is a view, sharing the same data buffer, so it will be as fast as possible. To test for view, try changing one element and see if it changes the original. The double reverse slice is the same as np.rot90(a,2). Look at it's code. – hpaulj Jun 27 '17 at 4:56
  • @hpaulj so you should add that as an answer – Antti Haapala Jun 27 '17 at 5:10
0

Here's another to throw into the mix.

a.ravel('F')[::-1].reshape(a.shape)
  • Although I like this because of ravel, its also about 200x slower than rot90(fliplr(a),-1). :/ – Jaden Travnik Jun 27 '17 at 9:02
  • No worries, I was just exploring other ways of doing it (-: – piRSquared Jun 27 '17 at 16:05
0

Try it in this manner,

np=np[::-1] #reverse the array
a = np.arange(16).reshape((4,4))

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