2

What's the best way to implement a SQL script that will grant select, references, insert, update, and delete permissions to a database role on all the user tables in a database?

Ideally, this script could be run multiple times, as new tables were added to the database. SQL Server Management Studio generates scripts for individual database objects, but I'm looking for more of a "fire-and-forget" script.

  • 1
    Isn't this what the db_datareader and db_datawriter roles are for? Or didn't they exist when this question was asked? – Edwin Stoteler Sep 17 '15 at 13:36
1

Dr Zimmerman is on the right track here. I'd be looking to write a stored procedure that has a cursor looping through user objects using execute immediate to affect the grant. Something like this:

 IF EXISTS (
    SELECT 1 FROM sysobjects
    WHERE name = 'sp_grantastic'
    AND type = 'P'
)
DROP PROCEDURE sp_grantastic
GO
CREATE PROCEDURE sp_grantastic
AS
DECLARE
 @object_name VARCHAR(30)
,@time       VARCHAR(8)
,@rights     VARCHAR(20)
,@role       VARCHAR(20)

DECLARE c_objects CURSOR FOR
    SELECT  name
    FROM    sysobjects
    WHERE   type IN ('P', 'U', 'V')
    FOR READ ONLY

BEGIN

    SELECT  @rights = 'ALL'
           ,@role = 'PUBLIC'

    OPEN c_objects
    WHILE (1=1)
    BEGIN
        FETCH c_objects INTO @object_name
        IF @@SQLSTATUS <> 0 BREAK

        SELECT @time = CONVERT(VARCHAR, GetDate(), 108)
        PRINT '[%1!] hitting up object %2!', @time, @object_name
        EXECUTE('GRANT '+ @rights +' ON '+ @object_name+' TO '+@role)

    END

    PRINT '[%1!] fin!', @time

    CLOSE c_objects
    DEALLOCATE CURSOR c_objects
END
GO
GRANT ALL ON sp_grantastic TO PUBLIC
GO

Then you can fire and forget:

EXEC sp_grantastic
2

I'm sure there is an easier way, but you could loop through the sysobjects table in the database and grant permissions to any user table objects that exist. You could then run that multiple times whenever new tables are added.

1

There's an undocumented MS procedure called sp_MSforeachtable that you could use which is definitely in 2000 and 2005.

To grant select permissions the usage would be:

EXECUTE sp_MSforeachtable @command1=' Grant Select on ? to RoleName'

To grant the other permissions either have a new statement for each one or just add them to the command like this:

EXECUTE sp_MSforeachtable @command1=' Grant Select on ? to RoleName; Grant Delete on ? to RoleName;'

With a bit of playing around it might be possible to turn the role name into a parameter as well.

0

We use something similar where I work. Looping through every Tables, Views, Stored Procedures of the system.

CREATE PROCEDURE dbo.SP_GrantFullAccess 
    @username varchar(300)
AS

DECLARE @on varchar(300) 
DECLARE @count int
SET @count = 0

PRINT 'Granting access to user ' + @username + ' on the following objects:'

DECLARE c CURSOR FOR 
SELECT name FROM sysobjects WHERE type IN('U', 'V', 'SP', 'P') ORDER BY name
OPEN c 
FETCH NEXT FROM c INTO @on 
WHILE @@FETCH_STATUS = 0 
BEGIN 
 SET @count = @count + 1
 EXEC('GRANT ALL ON [' + @on + '] TO [' + @username + ']') 
 --PRINT 'GRANT ALL ON [' + @on + '] TO ' + @username
 PRINT @on
 FETCH NEXT FROM c INTO @on 
END 
CLOSE c 
DEALLOCATE c

PRINT 'Granted access to ' + cast(@count as varchar(4)) + ' object(s).'
GO
0
use [YourDb]
GO
exec sp_MSforeachtable @command1=
    "GRANT DELETE, INSERT, REFERENCES, SELECT, UPDATE ON ? TO Admins, Mgmt",
    @whereand = " and o.name like 'tbl_%'"
GO

use [YourDb]
GO
exec sp_MSforeachtable @command1=
    "GRANT REFERENCES, SELECT ON ? TO Employee, public",
    @whereand = " and o.name like 'tbl_%'"
GO

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