1

Using Ruby 2.4, I have an array of unique, ordered numbers, for example

[1, 7, 8, 12, 14, 15]

How do I find the first two elements whose difference is 1? For example, the above array the answer to that is "7" and "8".

9

You could use each_cons and find to get the first element from the array of pairs where the second element less the first one is equal to 1:

p [1, 7, 8, 12, 14, 15].each_cons(2).find { |a, b| b - a == 1 }
# => [7, 8]
  • 7
    If you want the first match, use find { ... } instead of select { ... }[0] – Stefan Jun 27 '17 at 18:28
4

Here are three more ways.

#1

def first_adjacent_pair(arr)
  (arr.size-2).times { |i| return arr[i, 2] if arr[i+1] == arr[i].next }
  nil
end

first_adjacent_pair [1, 7, 8, 12, 14, 15] #=> [7,8]
first_adjacent_pair [1, 7, 5, 12, 14, 16] #=> nil

#2

def first_adjacent_pair(arr)
  enum = arr.to_enum # or arr.each
  loop do
    curr = enum.next
    nxt = enum.peek
    return [curr, nxt] if nxt == curr.next
  end
  nil
end

enum.peek raises a StopIteration exception when the enumerator enum has generated its last element with the preceding enum.next. The exception is handled by Kernel#loop by breaking out of the loop, after which nil is returned. See also Object#to_enum, Enumerator#next and Enumerator#peek.

#3

def first_adjacent_pair(arr)
  a = [nil, arr.first] 
  arr.each do |n|
    a.rotate!
    a[1] = n
    return a if a[1] == a[0] + 1
  end
  nil
end

See Array#rotate!.

  • 1
    Also arr[idx-1, 2] could be more concise for slicing out the answer here. – tadman Jun 27 '17 at 19:30
  • @tadman, thanks, good suggestion. – Cary Swoveland Jun 27 '17 at 19:32
  • Another note is that idx will either be a value from the array or nil, so idx && arr[idx-1,2] is another option. It side-steps a ternary, but might be equally confusing. Tough call. – tadman Jun 27 '17 at 19:33
  • 1
    @tadman, yes, I considered that (as well as what would now be arr[idx-1,2] unless idx.nil?), but thought the ternary would be clearer. – Cary Swoveland Jun 27 '17 at 19:48
  • 1
    Note that in #1, you already have the answer in the loop, i.e. arr[i-1] and arr[i]. Returning i in order to fetch the same values via arr[i-1, 2] seems redundant. – Stefan Jun 27 '17 at 22:22
1

Simple example

   X = [1, 7, 8, 12, 14, 15]

   X.each_with_index do |item, index|
    if index < X.count - 1
     if (X[index+1]-X[index] == 1) 
      puts item
     end
   end
  end
  • Could be simpler, though. – Sergio Tulentsev Jun 27 '17 at 18:35
  • JFYI, it's very un-rubyish to name your variables in Pascal case. – Sergio Tulentsev Jun 27 '17 at 18:37
1

Here's an alternate method provided for educational purposes:

arr = [1, 7, 8, 12, 14, 15]

arr.each_cons(2).map {|v|v.reduce(:-)}.index(-1)
0

One way to do this:

a.each_with_index { |e, i| break [ e, a[i.next] ] if a[i.next] == e.next } 
#=> [7, 8]

Unlike chunk or each_cons this doesn't create an array of arrays. It also breaks as soon as a pair is found.


Benchmarks

require 'fruity'

arr = ((1...1000)).to_a.reverse + [1,2]

def first_adjacent_pair(arr)
  idx = arr.each_index.drop(1).find { |i| (arr[i-1]-arr[i]).abs == 1 }
  idx ? arr[idx-1, 2] : nil
end

def first_adjacent_pair2(arr)
  enum = arr.to_enum
  loop do
    curr = enum.next
    nxt = enum.peek
    return [curr, nxt] if (curr-nxt).abs == 1
  end
  nil
end

compare do
  iceツ  { ar = arr.dup; ar.each_with_index { |e, i| break [ e, ar[i.next] ] if ar[i.next] == e.next }  }
  cary   { ar = arr.dup; first_adjacent_pair(ar) }
  cary2  { ar = arr.dup; first_adjacent_pair2(ar) }  
  seb    { ar = arr.dup; ar.each_cons(2).find{|a,b| b-a == 1} }
end

#Running each test 64 times. Test will take about 1 second.
#cary2 is faster than cary by 3x ± 0.1
#cary is faster than iceツ by 3x ± 0.1 (results differ: [999, 998] vs [1, 2])
#iceツ is faster than seb by 30.000000000000004% ± 10.0%

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