16

How do I add a shadow when a container overflows but only when needed?

What I mean by this is:

  • if there is content available to scroll either on top or bottom, show a shadow to tell the user there is more content to scoll
  • if there isn't content to scroll through, a shadow will not appear

And to clarify further

  • if the content of the container overflows (i.e. it scrolls) and the user is at the very top of the content then there should be a shadow on the bottom of the page and not the top.
  • Same goes if the user is at the bottom of the page expect that there should be a shadow on the top
  • if the content does not overflow the container, then no shadow should be shown to keep things clean.

I have working javascript solutions but I want something purely css for performance reasons.

Any ideas?

  • 1
    There is this CodePen sample, which is really similar to what you decribe, but it fades away instead of having shadows. It's pure CSS. – Octopus Jun 28 '17 at 4:30
  • @Octopus fading away might achieve the same thing as shadows but i don't think that code pen is doing exactly what i'm thinking of. It seems like they're using a fixed element that acts as a transparent layer over content that is present all the time and it just seems like it fades away because of the padding on the h1. if you remove this padding, the affect sort goes away. I'm looking for something that pushes that fade layer completely out of the way when it's not needed. I've been messing with position: sticky but i'm wondering if there's an easier way. – Rico Kahler Jun 28 '17 at 4:47
8

I think your looking for something like this;

Reference : LINK

html {
  background: white;
  font: 120% sans-serif;
}

.scrollbox {
  overflow: auto;
  width: 200px;
  max-height: 200px;
  margin: 50px auto;
  background: /* Shadow covers */
  linear-gradient(white 30%, rgba(255, 255, 255, 0)), linear-gradient(rgba(255, 255, 255, 0), white 70%) 0 100%, /* Shadows */
  radial-gradient(50% 0, farthest-side, rgba(0, 0, 0, .2), rgba(0, 0, 0, 0)), radial-gradient(50% 100%, farthest-side, rgba(0, 0, 0, .2), rgba(0, 0, 0, 0)) 0 100%;
  background: /* Shadow covers */
  linear-gradient(white 30%, rgba(255, 255, 255, 0)), linear-gradient(rgba(255, 255, 255, 0), white 70%) 0 100%, /* Shadows */
  radial-gradient(farthest-side at 50% 0, rgba(0, 0, 0, .2), rgba(0, 0, 0, 0)), radial-gradient(farthest-side at 50% 100%, rgba(0, 0, 0, .2), rgba(0, 0, 0, 0)) 0 100%;
  background-repeat: no-repeat;
  background-color: white;
  background-size: 100% 40px, 100% 40px, 100% 14px, 100% 14px;
  /* Opera doesn't support this in the shorthand */
  background-attachment: local, local, scroll, scroll;
}
<div class="scrollbox">
  <ul>
    <li>I Show Below Shadow. Go Down Now</li>
    <li>1</li>
    <li>2</li>
    <li>3</li>
    <li>4</li>
    <li>5</li>
    <li>6</li>
    <li>7</li>
    <li>8</li>
    <li>9</li>
    <li>10</li>
    <li>11</li>
    <li>12</li>
    <li>13</li>
    <li>14</li>
    <li>15</li>
    <li>16</li>
    <li>17</li>
    <li>18</li>
    <li>19</li>
    <li>20</li>
    <li>The end!</li>
    <li>No shadow here. See Above. Go Up</li>
  </ul>
</div>

  • 1
    yup that's close! FYI it's not working in chrome correctly but it seems to work in firefox on a mac. let me dissect this a bit and i'll probably accept it – Rico Kahler Jun 28 '17 at 5:30
  • i used chrome works (win) – Hash Jun 28 '17 at 5:37
  • hmm weird. well this definitely answers my question. Add this link to the original post in your answer and i'll accept it. No here plagiarism ya feel? – Rico Kahler Jun 28 '17 at 5:42
  • 1
    added the reference. – Hash Jun 28 '17 at 6:33
  • 1
    But the shadow should stay on top of the contents otherwise the effect doesn't works if the content is colored. – AGPX Jun 1 '18 at 13:19
17

I apologize for answering my own question here but after some googling, I found a good CSS-only solution that works in chrome on macOS.

@Hash provided a solution taken from lea verou's blog. Her solution uses background-attachment: local to achieve the effect however this is currently broken in chrome 59 on macOS?? (It worked in 2012 but not in 2017 for me right now at least) Nevertheless, her solution is great and you should read more about it here.

In her article (from 2012) she refers to an older yet more compatible solution that uses pseudo elements. This blog post is by Roman Komarov and here are some direct quotes from his article.

Here’s an old idea, but recre­ated with pure CSS.

Orig­i­nally, I had an ex­tra wrap­per and two ex­tra pseudo-el­e­ments on it. Later I de­cided to rewrite the code and to use just a sin­gle el­e­ment (by us­ing ra­dial gra­di­ents).

While this method is sim­ple, there are some lim­i­ta­tions:

  • the back­ground must be solid
    • how­ever, if you'd try back­ground-at­tach­ment: fixed…)
  • there are some po­si­tion­ing is­sues

But in most re­gards this method is rather bul­let­proof.

If you re­place the CSS-gra­di­ents with sim­ple im­ages, this method could work in IE. (It might need a few more small fixes; I didn't check.)

And here is some code copied directly from his blog:

html {
  background: #FFF;
}

.scrollbox {
  position: relative;
  z-index: 1;
  overflow: auto;
  width: 200px;
  max-height: 200px;
  margin: 50px auto;
  background: #FFF no-repeat;
  background-image: -webkit-radial-gradient(50% 0, farthest-side, rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2), rgba(0, 0, 0, 0)), -webkit-radial-gradient(50% 100%, farthest-side, rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2), rgba(0, 0, 0, 0));
  background-image: -moz-radial-gradient(50% 0, farthest-side, rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2), rgba(0, 0, 0, 0)), -moz-radial-gradient(50% 100%, farthest-side, rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2), rgba(0, 0, 0, 0));
  background-image: radial-gradient(farthest-side at 50% 0, rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2), rgba(0, 0, 0, 0)), radial-gradient(farthest-side at 50% 100%, rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2), rgba(0, 0, 0, 0));
  background-position: 0 0, 0 100%;
  background-size: 100% 14px;
}

.scrollbox:before,
.scrollbox:after {
  content: "";
  position: relative;
  z-index: -1;
  display: block;
  height: 30px;
  margin: 0 0 -30px;
  background: -webkit-linear-gradient(top, #FFF, #FFF 30%, rgba(255, 255, 255, 0));
  background: -moz-linear-gradient(top, #FFF, #FFF 30%, rgba(255, 255, 255, 0));
  background: linear-gradient(to bottom, #FFF, #FFF 30%, rgba(255, 255, 255, 0));
}

.scrollbox:after {
  margin: -30px 0 0;
  background: -webkit-linear-gradient(top, rgba(255, 255, 255, 0), #FFF 70%, #FFF);
  background: -moz-linear-gradient(top, rgba(255, 255, 255, 0), #FFF 70%, #FFF);
  background: linear-gradient(to bottom, rgba(255, 255, 255, 0), #FFF 70%, #FFF);
}
<div class="scrollbox">
    <ul>
        <li>Not enough content to scroll</li>
        <li>2</li>
        <li>3</li>
        <li>4</li>
        <li>5</li>
    </ul>
</div>


<div class="scrollbox">
    <ul>
        <li>Ah! Scroll below!</li>
        <li>2</li>
        <li>3</li>
        <li>4</li>
        <li>5</li>
        <li>6</li>
        <li>7</li>
        <li>8</li>
        <li>9</li>
        <li>10</li>
        <li>1</li>
        <li>2</li>
        <li>3</li>
        <li>4</li>
        <li>5</li>
        <li>6</li>
        <li>7</li>
        <li>8</li>
        <li>9</li>
        <li>10</li>
        <li>1</li>
        <li>2</li>
        <li>3</li>
        <li>4</li>
        <li>5</li>
        <li>6</li>
        <li>7</li>
        <li>8</li>
        <li>The end!</li>
        <li>No shadow there.</li>
    </ul>
</div>

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