16

I am trying to declare an abstract class A with a constructor with a default behavior: all subclasses must initialize a member self.n:

from abc import ABCMeta

class A(object):
    __metaclass__ = ABCMeta

    def __init__(self, n):
        self.n = n

However, I do not want to let the A class be instantiated because, well, it is an abstract class. The problem is, this is actually allowed:

a = A(3)

This produces no errors, when I would expect it should.

So: how can I define an un-instantiable abstract class while defining a default behavior for the constructor?

18

Making the __init__ an abstract method:

from abc import ABCMeta, abstractmethod

class A(object):
    __metaclass__ = ABCMeta

    @abstractmethod
    def __init__(self, n):
        self.n = n


if __name__ == '__main__':
    a = A(3)

helps:

TypeError: Can't instantiate abstract class A with abstract methods __init__

Python 3 version:

from abc import ABCMeta, abstractmethod

class A(object, metaclass=ABCMeta):

    @abstractmethod
    def __init__(self, n):
        self.n = n


if __name__ == '__main__':
    a = A(3)

Works as well:

TypeError: Can't instantiate abstract class A with abstract methods __init__
  • That is not producing any error !! instantiating works fine – void Jun 28 '17 at 11:19
  • 5
    This would still require defining __init__ in each of the base classes(with a super() call). – Ashwini Chaudhary Jun 28 '17 at 11:30
  • 1
    quoting myself from a similar answer: question: what's the point of defining a class as abstract if you need to explicitly specify the constructor as an abstract method? (note I am not implying that all an abstract class is, is just an un-instantiable class) I would expect this behavior as default for an abstract class – dabadaba Jun 28 '17 at 11:35
  • 2
    @dabadaba: Setting the meta class to ABCmeta does not declare a class as abstract, it only makes it possible to do that (by declaring one of the methods as abstract). – Rörd Jun 28 '17 at 11:39
  • 1
    @MikeMüller Indeed, but that doesn't necessarily means all of them should redefine __init__ every time. Like they asked: "how can I define an un-instantiable abstract class while defining a default behavior for the constructor?". Your approach was the first thing in my mind as well, but they had a different request. But anyways this has been accepted, so doesn't matter I guess. – Ashwini Chaudhary Jun 28 '17 at 23:01
3

You should define the methods as abstract as well with the @abc.abstractmethod decorator.

  • question: what's the point of defining a class as abstract if you need to explicitly specify the constructor as an abstract method? (note I am not implying that all an abstract class is, is just an un-instantiable class) – dabadaba Jun 28 '17 at 11:34
  • I guess because an ABCMeta is not exactly an abstract class like in other languages. – Ignacio Vergara Kausel Jun 28 '17 at 11:36
2

A not so elegant solution can be this:

class A(object):
  def __init__(self, n):
    if self.__class__ == A:
      raise Exception('I am abstract!')
    self.n = n

Usage

class B(A):
  pass
a = A(1)  # Will throw exception
b = B(1)  # Works fine as expected.
2

You can override __new__ method to prevent direct instantiation.

class A(object):
    __metaclass__ = ABCMeta

    def __new__(cls, *args, **kwargs):
        if cls is A:
            raise TypeError(
                "TypeError: Can't instantiate abstract class {name} directly".format(name=cls.__name__)
            )
        return object.__new__(cls)

Output:

>>> A()
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<ipython-input-8-3cd318a12eea>", line 1, in <module>
    A()
  File "/Users/ashwini/py/so.py", line 11, in __new__
    "TypeError: Can't instantiate abstract class {name} directly".format(name=cls.__name__)
TypeError: TypeError: Can't instantiate abstract class A directly
  • You're not supposed to forward args and kwargs to the object constructor. object takes no parameters. – Aran-Fey Jun 28 '17 at 11:19
  • @Rawing Where does it say so? The arguments passed to __init__ are passed to __new__ and __call__ later on. – Ashwini Chaudhary Jun 28 '17 at 11:26
  • Well then try A(3) and tell me if it works... The arguments passed to __new__ are automatically forwarded to __init__ after __new__ returns an instance. You don't want to forward them to object.__new__, because it doesn't accept them. – Aran-Fey Jun 28 '17 at 11:30
  • Oh, nevermind, this works in python 2. Weird. Still, there's no reason to forward the parameters, is there? – Aran-Fey Jun 28 '17 at 11:34

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