21

I used crc32 to calculate checksums from strings a long time ago, but I cannot remember how I did it.

echo -n "LongString" | crc32    # no output

I found a solution [1] to calculate them with Python, but is there not a direct way to calculate that from a string?

# signed
python -c 'import binascii; print binascii.crc32("LongString")'
python -c 'import zlib; print zlib.crc32("LongString")'
# unsigned
python -c 'import binascii; print binascii.crc32("LongString") % (1<<32)'
python -c 'import zlib; print zlib.crc32("LongString") % (1<<32)'

[1] How to calculate CRC32 with Python to match online results?

7 Answers 7

35

I came up against this problem myself and I didn't want to go to the "hassle" of installing crc32. I came up with this, and although it's a little nasty it should work on most platforms, or most modern linux anyway ...

echo -n "LongString" | gzip -1 -c | tail -c8 | hexdump -n4 -e '"%u"'

Just to provide some technical details, gzip uses crc32 in the last 8 bytes and the -c option causes it to output to standard output and tail strips out the last 8 bytes. (-1 as suggested by @MarkAdler so we don't waste time actually doing the compression).

hexdump was a little trickier and I had to futz about with it for a while before I came up with something satisfactory, but the format here seems to correctly parse the gzip crc32 as a single 32-bit number:

  • -n4 takes only the relevant first 4 bytes of the gzip footer.
  • '"%u"' is your standard fprintf format string that formats the bytes as a single unsigned 32-bit integer. Notice that there are double quotes nested within single quotes here.

If you want a hexadecimal checksum you can change the format string to '"%08x"' (or '"%08X"' for upper case hex) which will format the checksum as 8 character (0 padded) hexadecimal.

Like I say, not the most elegant solution, and perhaps not an approach you'd want to use in a performance-sensitive scenario but an approach that might appeal given the near universality of the commands used.

The weak point here for cross-platform usability is probably the hexdump configuration, since I have seen variations on it from platform to platform and it's a bit fiddly. I'd suggest if you're using this you should try some test values and compare with the results of an online tool.

EDIT As suggested by @PedroGimeno in the comments, you can pipe the output into od instead of hexdump for identical results without the fiddly options. ... | od -t x4 -N 4 -A n for hex ... | od -t d4 -N 4 -A n for decimal.

4
  • 5
    A more portable solution for hexadecimal is to use od instead of hexdump: ... | od -t x4 -N 4 -A n Sep 3, 2018 at 21:28
  • can confirm this works a treat! -t x4 for hexadecimal output and -t d4 for decimal.
    – robert
    Sep 6, 2018 at 10:49
  • 3
    Use gzip -1 -c to make the compression faster, since you're throwing that away anyway.
    – Mark Adler
    Aug 19, 2021 at 23:48
  • on some plateform like msys you need to add -f to force gzip compression... "gzip -1 -f -c" in place of "gzip -1 -c" Nov 27, 2023 at 23:53
31

Or just use the process substitution:

crc32 <(echo -n "LongString")

(EDIT: thx @tor-klingberg)

3
  • 1
    I was looking for this to be able to use pv also. Which outputs a file as a string while producing a progress bar. crc32 <(pv /some/file) worked perfectly.
    – George
    Jul 18, 2019 at 0:05
  • 5
    If you want your pipes going left to right you can do echo -n "LongString" | crc32 /dev/stdin. /dev/stdin is a special file that contains the input of the process. May 28, 2020 at 14:07
  • Just a suggestion, but probably makes more sense to do crc32 <(printf "LongString") so you don't get a \n appended Oct 31, 2022 at 15:34
10

I use cksum and convert to hex using the shell builtin printf:

$ echo -n "LongString"  | cksum | cut -d\  -f1 | xargs echo printf '%0X\\n' | sh
5751BDB2

The cksum command first appeared on 4.4BSD UNIX and should be present in all modern systems.

3
  • I had to use cut -d" " -f1 instead of cut -d\ -f1 (SO trims one of the two spaces here) or it would only give an error.
    – Bowi
    May 25, 2020 at 9:21
  • Similar, but using argument substitution instead of piping to xargs/echo/sh: printf '%X\n' "$(echo -n "LongString" | cksum | cut -d' ' -f1)" May 25, 2023 at 23:17
  • I don’t know why, but cksum from GNU coreutils 8.32 gives me results different from other methods such as zlib and 7z. I’m guessing it’s using a different kind of CRC, although both the man page and Wikipedia suggest they should be the same.
    – Chortos-2
    Dec 30, 2023 at 21:11
8

Your question already has most of the answer.

echo -n 123456789 | python -c 'import sys;import zlib;print(zlib.crc32(sys.stdin.read())%(1<<32))'

correctly gives 3421780262

I prefer hex:

echo -n 123456789 | python -c 'import sys;import zlib;print("%08x"%(zlib.crc32(sys.stdin.read())%(1<<32)))'
cbf43926

Be aware that there are several CRC-32 algorithms: http://reveng.sourceforge.net/crc-catalogue/all.htm#crc.cat-bits.32

6
  • Interesting that none of those listed there employs the "ZIP" poly of EDB88320
    – silverdr
    Oct 8, 2019 at 17:35
  • @silverdr All of the ones with poly=0x04c11db7 and refin=true do. CRC-32/ISO-HDLC listed there is the PKZIP CRC.
    – Mark Adler
    Oct 9, 2019 at 4:09
  • I must be missing something obvious here but how does poly=0x04c11db7 mean employing edb88320? I guess it has something to do with the refin=true? Honest question as I was looking for definitions needed to adapt a checksumming routine and found conflicting (to me) information. Eventually ended up using edb88320 with starting seed ffffffff and final ffffffff EOR to get results compatible with what the mentioned crc32 script outputs.
    – silverdr
    Oct 9, 2019 at 6:57
  • @silverdr 0xedb88320 is the bit reversal of 0x04c11db7. refin=true means that the input bits are reflected. In practice, that is never done, since you would have to do it to every input byte. Instead the polynomial is reflected, once.
    – Mark Adler
    Oct 9, 2019 at 16:53
  • Python 3: | python3 -c 'import sys;import zlib;print("{:x}".format(zlib.crc32(sys.stdin.buffer.read())%(1<<32)))' Aug 19, 2021 at 19:26
7

On Ubuntu, at least, /usr/bin/crc32 is a short Perl script, and you can see quite clearly from its source that all it can do is open files. It has no facility to read from stdin -- it doesn't have special handling for - as a filename, or a -c parameter or anything like that.

So your easiest approach is to live with it, and make a temporary file.

tmpfile=$(mktemp)
echo -n "LongString" > "$tmpfile"
crc32 "$tmpfile"
rm -f "$tmpfile"

If you really don't want to write a file (e.g. it's more data than your filesystem can take -- unlikely if it's really a "long string", but for the sake for argument...) you could use a named pipe. To a simple non-random-access reader this is indistinguishable from a file:

fifo=$(mktemp -u)
mkfifo "$fifo"
echo -n "LongString" > "$fifo" &
crc32 "$fifo"
rm -f "$fifo"

Note the & to background the process which writes to fifo, because it will block until the next command reads it.

To be more fastidious about temporary file creation, see: https://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/181937/how-create-a-temporary-file-in-shell-script


Alternatively, use what's in the script as an example from which to write your own Perl one-liner (the presence of crc32 on your system indicates that Perl and the necessary module are installed), or use the Python one-liner you've already found.

1
  • 1
    This also works by handling the FIFO for you : crc32 <(echo -n "LongString") Nov 5, 2018 at 15:57
7

Here is a pure Bash implementation:

#!/usr/bin/env bash

declare -i -a CRC32_LOOKUP_TABLE

__generate_crc_lookup_table() {
  local -i -r LSB_CRC32_POLY=0xEDB88320 # The CRC32 polynomal LSB order
  local -i index byte lsb
  for index in {0..255}; do
    ((byte = 255 - index))
    for _ in {0..7}; do # 8-bit lsb shift
      ((lsb = byte & 0x01, byte = ((byte >> 1) & 0x7FFFFFFF) ^ (lsb == 0 ? LSB_CRC32_POLY : 0)))
    done
    ((CRC32_LOOKUP_TABLE[index] = byte))
  done
}
__generate_crc_lookup_table
typeset -r CRC32_LOOKUP_TABLE

crc32_string() {
  [[ ${#} -eq 1 ]] || return
  local -i i byte crc=0xFFFFFFFF index
  for ((i = 0; i < ${#1}; i++)); do
    byte=$(printf '%d' "'${1:i:1}") # Get byte value of character at i
    ((index = (crc ^ byte) & 0xFF, crc = (CRC32_LOOKUP_TABLE[index] ^ (crc >> 8)) & 0xFFFFFFFF))
  done
  echo $((crc ^ 0xFFFFFFFF))
}

printf 'The CRC32 of: %s\nis: %08x\n' "${1}" "$(crc32_string "${1}")"

# crc32_string "The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog"
# yields 414fa339

Testing:

bash ./crc32.sh "The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog"
The CRC32 of: The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog
is: 414fa339

For the glory of it, here is a POSIX shell grammar version:

Since POSIX shell has no table, it uses a hard-coded polynomials argument list.

#!/usr/bin/env sh

__generate_crc_lookup_args() {
  lsbCrc32Poly=3988292384 # 0xEDB88320 The CRC32 polynomal LSB order
  i=0
  while [ "$i" -le 255 ]; do
    byte=$((255 - i))
    for _ in 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7; do # 8-bit lsb shift
      lsb=$((byte & 0x01))
      byte=$(( ((byte >> 1) & 2147483647) ^ (lsb == 0 ? lsbCrc32Poly : 0) ))
    done
    i=$((i + 1))
    if [ $((i % 8)) -eq 0 ]
    then printf '%10d \\\n' "$byte"
    else printf '%10d ' "$byte"
    fi
  done
  printf \\n
}

# Uncomment to see generated CRC32 lookup arguments that have been hardcoded in crc32Lookup
#__generate_crc_lookup_args && exit

getArg(){ shift "$1"; printf %s\\n "$2";}

crc32Lookup() {

  # CRC32 LOOKUP ARGS
  getArg "$1" \
            0 1996959894 3993919788 2567524794  124634137 1886057615 3915621685 2657392035 \
    249268274 2044508324 3772115230 2547177864  162941995 2125561021 3887607047 2428444049 \
    498536548 1789927666 4089016648 2227061214  450548861 1843258603 4107580753 2211677639 \
    325883990 1684777152 4251122042 2321926636  335633487 1661365465 4195302755 2366115317 \
    997073096 1281953886 3579855332 2724688242 1006888145 1258607687 3524101629 2768942443 \
    901097722 1119000684 3686517206 2898065728  853044451 1172266101 3705015759 2882616665 \
    651767980 1373503546 3369554304 3218104598  565507253 1454621731 3485111705 3099436303 \
    671266974 1594198024 3322730930 2970347812  795835527 1483230225 3244367275 3060149565 \
    1994146192   31158534 2563907772 4023717930 1907459465  112637215 2680153253 3904427059 \
    2013776290  251722036 2517215374 3775830040 2137656763  141376813 2439277719 3865271297 \
    1802195444  476864866 2238001368 4066508878 1812370925  453092731 2181625025 4111451223 \
    1706088902  314042704 2344532202 4240017532 1658658271  366619977 2362670323 4224994405 \
    1303535960  984961486 2747007092 3569037538 1256170817 1037604311 2765210733 3554079995 \
    1131014506  879679996 2909243462 3663771856 1141124467  855842277 2852801631 3708648649 \
    1342533948  654459306 3188396048 3373015174 1466479909  544179635 3110523913 3462522015 \
    1591671054  702138776 2966460450 3352799412 1504918807  783551873 3082640443 3233442989 \
    3988292384 2596254646   62317068 1957810842 3939845945 2647816111   81470997 1943803523 \
    3814918930 2489596804  225274430 2053790376 3826175755 2466906013  167816743 2097651377 \
    4027552580 2265490386  503444072 1762050814 4150417245 2154129355  426522225 1852507879 \
    4275313526 2312317920  282753626 1742555852 4189708143 2394877945  397917763 1622183637 \
    3604390888 2714866558  953729732 1340076626 3518719985 2797360999 1068828381 1219638859 \
    3624741850 2936675148  906185462 1090812512 3747672003 2825379669  829329135 1181335161 \
    3412177804 3160834842  628085408 1382605366 3423369109 3138078467  570562233 1426400815 \
    3317316542 2998733608  733239954 1555261956 3268935591 3050360625  752459403 1541320221 \
    2607071920 3965973030 1969922972   40735498 2617837225 3943577151 1913087877   83908371 \
    2512341634 3803740692 2075208622  213261112 2463272603 3855990285 2094854071  198958881 \
    2262029012 4057260610 1759359992  534414190 2176718541 4139329115 1873836001  414664567 \
    2282248934 4279200368 1711684554  285281116 2405801727 4167216745 1634467795  376229701 \
    2685067896 3608007406 1308918612  956543938 2808555105 3495958263 1231636301 1047427035 \
    2932959818 3654703836 1088359270  936918000 2847714899 3736837829 1202900863  817233897 \
    3183342108 3401237130 1404277552  615818150 3134207493 3453421203 1423857449  601450431 \
    3009837614 3294710456 1567103746  711928724 3020668471 3272380065 1510334235  755167117
}

crc32String() {
  [ $# -gt 0 ] || return
  crc=4294967295 # 0xFFFFFFFF
  i=1
  while [ "$i" -le "${#1}" ]; do
    # Get byte value of character at i
    byte=$(printf '%d' "'$(printf %s "$1" | cut -b $i )")
    bi=$(( bi = (crc ^ byte) & 255 ))
    crc=$(( ($(crc32Lookup $bi) ^ (crc >> 8)) & 4294967295 ))
    i=$((i+1))
  done
  printf %d\\n $((crc ^ 4294967295))
}

printf 'The CRC32 of: %s\nis: %08X\n' "$1" "$(crc32String "$1")"

# crc32_string "The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog"
# yields 414FA339
2

You can try to use rhash.

Testing:

## install 'rhash'...
$ sudo apt-get install rhash
## test CRC32...
$ echo -n 123456789 | rhash --simple -
cbf43926  (stdin)
1
  • 2
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