4

I've been wondering recently if there's a way to detect whether a context manager is nested.

I've created Timer and TimerGroup classes:

class Timer:
    def __init__(self, name="Timer"):
        self.name = name
        self.start_time = clock()

    @staticmethod
    def seconds_to_str(t):
        return str(timedelta(seconds=t))

    def end(self):
        return clock() - self.start_time

    def print(self, t):
        print(("{0:<" + str(line_width - 18) + "} >> {1}").format(self.name, self.seconds_to_str(t)))

    def __enter__(self):
        return self

    def __exit__(self, exc_type, value, traceback):
        self.print(self.end())


class TimerGroup(Timer):
    def __enter__(self):
        print(('= ' + self.name + ' ').ljust(line_width, '='))
        return self

    def __exit__(self, exc_type, exc_val, exc_tb):
        total_time = self.seconds_to_str(self.end())
        print(" Total: {0}".format(total_time).rjust(line_width, '='))
        print()

This code prints timings in a readable format:

with TimerGroup("Collecting child documents for %s context" % context_name):
    with Timer("Collecting context features"):
        # some code...
    with Timer("Collecting child documents"):
        # some code...


= Collecting child documents for Global context ============
Collecting context features                >> 0:00:00.001063
Collecting child documents                 >> 0:00:10.611130
====================================== Total: 0:00:10.612292

However, when I nest TimerGroups, it messed things up:

with TimerGroup("Choosing the best classifier for %s context" % context_name):
    with Timer("Splitting datasets"):
        # some code...
    for cname, cparams in classifiers.items():
        with TimerGroup("%s classifier" % cname):
            with Timer("Training"):
                # some code...
            with Timer("Calculating accuracy on testing set"):
                # some code


= Choosing the best classifier for Global context ==========
Splitting datasets                         >> 0:00:00.002054
= Naive Bayes classifier ===================================
Training                                   >> 0:00:34.184903
Calculating accuracy on testing set        >> 0:05:08.481904
====================================== Total: 0:05:42.666949

====================================== Total: 0:05:42.669078

All I need is to do is to indent the nested Timers and TimerGroups somehow. Should I pass any parameters to their constructors? Or can I detect that from inside the class?

1
  • 2
    You can change TimerGroup to accept another timer group as a "parent timer group", and in each TimeGroup instance, store the indentation (Being 0 if no parent, and parent.indentation + 1 if there is one)
    – Artyer
    Commented Jun 28, 2017 at 14:15

3 Answers 3

6

There are no special facilities to detect nested context managers, no. You'd have to handle this on your own. You could do this within your own context manager:

import threading


class TimerGroup(Timer):
    _active_group = threading.local()

    def __enter__(self):
        if getattr(TimerGroup._active_group, 'current', False):
            raise RuntimeError("Can't nest TimerGroup context managers")
        TimerGroup._active_group.current = self
        print(('= ' + self.name + ' ').ljust(line_width, '='))
        return self

    def __exit__(self, exc_type, exc_val, exc_tb):
        TimerGroup._active_group.current = None
        total_time = self.seconds_to_str(self.end())
        print(" Total: {0}".format(total_time).rjust(line_width, '='))
        print()

You can then use the TimerGroup._active_group attribute elsewhere to grab the currently active group. I used a thread-local object to ensure that this can be used across multiple threads of execution.

Alternatively, you could make that a stack counter and just increment and decrement in nested __enter__ calls, or a stack list and push self onto that stack, popping it again when you __exit__:

import threading


class TimerGroup(Timer):
    _active_group = threading.local()

    def __enter__(self):
        if not hasattr(TimerGroup._active_group, 'current'):
            TimerGroup._active_group.current = []
        stack = TimerGroup._active_group.current
        if stack:
            # nested context manager.
            # do something with stack[-1] or stack[0]
        TimerGroup._active_group.current.append(self)

        print(('= ' + self.name + ' ').ljust(line_width, '='))
        return self

    def __exit__(self, exc_type, exc_val, exc_tb):
        last = TimerGroup._active_group.current.pop()
        assert last == self, "Context managers being exited out of order"
        total_time = self.seconds_to_str(self.end())
        print(" Total: {0}".format(total_time).rjust(line_width, '='))
        print()
1
  • It's natural to make groups nestable, too, and make _active_group a list, that is, a stack.
    – 9000
    Commented Jun 28, 2017 at 14:16
3

If all you need to do is adjust an indentation level based on how many nested context managers you're executing in, then have a class attribute called indent_level and adjust it each time you enter and exit a context manager. Something like the following:

class Context:
    indent_level = 0

    def __init__(self, name):
        self.name = name

    def __enter__(self):
        print(' '*4*self.indent_level + 'Entering ' + self.name)
        self.adjust_indent_level(1)
        return self

    def __exit__(self, *a, **k):
        self.adjust_indent_level(-1)
        print(' '*4*self.indent_level + 'Exiting ' + self.name)

    @classmethod
    def adjust_indent_level(cls, val):
        cls.indent_level += val

And use it as:

>>> with Context('Outer') as outer_context:
        with Context('Inner') as inner_context:
            print(' '*inner_context.indent_level*4 + 'In the inner context')


Entering Outer
    Entering Inner
        In the inner context
    Exiting Inner
Exiting Outer
2
  • Your code seems to work only for a single timer class. However, I have Timer and TimerGroup(Timer) here, and indent counter seems to be created for each independently. Is there a way to create a field that is shared among all classes in the hierarchy? My idea was to modifyTimer.indent_level in the adjust_indent_level() method and call it only inside TimerGroup's __enter__ and __exit__ methods.
    – QooBooS
    Commented Jun 28, 2017 at 15:04
  • If you're always single-threaded, this will work. For multi-threaded approach, see Martijn-Pieters's answer for the use of threading.local.
    – 9000
    Commented Jun 28, 2017 at 16:27
1

import this:

Explicit is better than implicit

A cleaner design would explicitly allow to specify a group:

with TimerGroup('Doing big task') as big_task_tg:
    with Timer('Foo', big_task_tg):
      foo_result = foo()
    with Timer('Bar', big_task_tg):
      bar(baz(foo_result))

On the other hand, you can always use traceback.extract_stack and look for invocations of a particular function upstream. It is very useful for logging and error reporting, and can be moderately useful to ensure that particular functions are only invoked in a certain context. But it tends to create dependencies that are very hard to track.

I would avoid it for grouping timers, though you can try. If you badly need automatic grouping, @Martijn-Pieters's approach is far superior.

1
  • Your idea is pretty good for basic usage, however I need sometimes to call timers from different methods (one method calling another, and using Timers that need to be nested). So @Billy's answer is more appropriate for my problem, I think.
    – QooBooS
    Commented Jun 28, 2017 at 15:09

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