114

I want to generate a selectbox using two arrays, one containing the country codes and another containing the country names.

This is an example:

$codes = ['tn', 'us', 'fr'];
$names = ['Tunisia', 'United States', 'France'];

foreach( $codes as $code and $names as $name ) {
    echo '<option value="' . $code . '">' . $name . '</option>';
}

This method didn't work for me. Any suggestions?

1

26 Answers 26

177
foreach( $codes as $code and $names as $name ) { }

That is not valid.

You probably want something like this...

foreach( $codes as $index => $code ) {
   echo '<option value="' . $code . '">' . $names[$index] . '</option>';
}

Alternatively, it'd be much easier to make the codes the key of your $names array...

$names = array(
   'tn' => 'Tunisia',
   'us' => 'United States',
   ...
);
2
  • useful in parsing form field arrays. Nov 17, 2014 at 6:31
  • 2
    avoid starting your answer with non-functional code only to say later that it doesn't work. A negative statement should be prefaced as negative when it spans multiple paragraphs
    – sybog64
    Nov 16, 2021 at 10:04
97

foreach operates on only one array at a time.

The way your array is structured, you can array_combine() them into an array of key-value pairs then foreach that single array:

foreach (array_combine($codes, $names) as $code => $name) {
    echo '<option value="' . $code . '">' . $name . '</option>';
}

Or as seen in the other answers, you can hardcode an associative array instead.

6
  • Can this also be used for three arrays?
    – xjshiya
    Jun 16, 2014 at 9:15
  • 1
    @xjshiya No, if you give them 3 parameters you get Warning: array_combine() expects exactly 2 parameters, 3 given
    – Julian
    Sep 23, 2014 at 10:32
  • @xjshiya You could do array_combine($arr1, array_combine($arr2, $arr3))
    – logicbloke
    Aug 8, 2022 at 10:00
  • That only works for string and int values, it won't work for objects, booleans and other arrays.
    – Danon
    Dec 9, 2022 at 10:03
  • And it doesn't work for arrays that are already associative.
    – Danon
    Dec 9, 2022 at 10:16
29

Use array_combine() to fuse the arrays together and iterate over the result.

$countries = array_combine($codes, $names);
2
  • That only works for string and int values, it won't work for objects, booleans and other arrays.
    – Danon
    Dec 9, 2022 at 10:03
  • Using array_combine() may not be suitable if the values which become keys are not compatible or become mutated when used as array keys. Dec 1, 2023 at 6:47
9

array_map seems good for this too

$codes = array('tn','us','fr');
$names = array('Tunisia','United States','France');

array_map(function ($code, $name) {
    echo '<option value="' . $code . '">' . $name . '</option>';
}, $codes, $names);

Other benefits are:

  • If one array is shorter than the other, the callback receive null values to fill in the gap.

  • You can use more than 2 arrays to iterate through.

4
  • array_map() is appropriate when its return value is accessed. When the return data is unneeded, array_walk() is more appropriate. Apr 21, 2022 at 8:08
  • Hi, true for the return functionality, though array_walk() doesn't accept more than one array (to iterate on each element of the 2 arrays at the same time), you may use its 3rd argument $arg, but you will get the whole array in each iteration instead of each of its elements.
    – Ermac
    Apr 23, 2022 at 4:59
  • A simple foreach() would also be more appropriate when no return value is sought. Apr 23, 2022 at 5:02
  • array_walk() is certainly a viable tool for this task as demonstrated by @oLinkWebDevelopment's answer from back in 2014. Dec 5, 2023 at 0:51
6

Use an associative array:

$code_names = array(
                    'tn' => 'Tunisia',
                    'us' => 'United States',
                    'fr' => 'France');

foreach($code_names as $code => $name) {
   //...
}

I believe that using an associative array is the most sensible approach as opposed to using array_combine() because once you have an associative array, you can simply use array_keys() or array_values() to get exactly the same array you had before.

3
  • +1 array_combine() already produces an associative array, you may want to be clearer about initializing it as associative.
    – BoltClock
    Dec 18, 2010 at 23:57
  • 1
    That only works for string and int values, it won't work for objects, booleans and other arrays.
    – Danon
    Dec 9, 2022 at 10:03
  • Further to Danon's comment, this is also not stable when the keys contain: null or float values. Dec 1, 2023 at 6:46
4

This worked for me:

$codes = array('tn', 'us', 'fr');
$names = array('Tunisia', 'United States', 'France');
foreach($codes as $key => $value) {
    echo "Code is: " . $codes[$key] . " - " . "and Name: " . $names[$key] . "<br>";
}
1
  • This is a worse copy of the accepted answer -- $value is simpler to use than $codes[$key]. Dec 1, 2023 at 6:42
4

Your code like this is incorrect as foreach only for single array:

<?php
        $codes = array('tn','us','fr');
        $names = array('Tunisia','United States','France');

        foreach( $codes as $code and $names as $name ) {
            echo '<option value="' . $code . '">' . $name . '</option>';
            }
?>

Alternative, Change to this:

<?php
        $codes = array('tn','us','fr');
        $names = array('Tunisia','United States','France');
        $count = 0;

        foreach($codes as $code) {
             echo '<option value="' . $code . '">' . $names[count] . '</option>';
             $count++;
        }

?>
1
  • The accepted answer already gives better advice than this because there is no need to maintain a counter variable. (and your snippet has a typo) Dec 1, 2023 at 6:40
3

Walk it out...

$codes = array('tn','us','fr');
$names = array('Tunisia','United States','France');
  • PHP 5.3+

    array_walk($codes, function ($code,$key) use ($names) { 
        echo '<option value="' . $code . '">' . $names[$key] . '</option>';
    });
    
  • Before PHP 5.3

    array_walk($codes, function ($code,$key,$names){ 
        echo '<option value="' . $code . '">' . $names[$key] . '</option>';
    },$names);
    
  • or combine

    array_walk(array_combine($codes,$names), function ($name,$code){ 
        echo '<option value="' . $code . '">' . $name . '</option>';
    })
    
  • in select

    array_walk(array_combine($codes,$names), function ($name,$code){ 
        @$opts = '<option value="' . $code . '">' . $name . '</option>';
    })
    echo "<select>$opts</select>";
    

demo

1
  • Using array_combine() may not be suitable if the values which become keys are not compatible or become mutated when used as array keys. Dec 1, 2023 at 6:47
2

Why not just consolidate into a multi-dimensional associative array? Seems like you are going about this wrong:

$codes = array('tn','us','fr');
$names = array('Tunisia','United States','France');

becomes:

$dropdown = array('tn' => 'Tunisia', 'us' => 'United States', 'fr' => 'France');
3
  • 2
    It's called an associative array, not a multidimensional array.
    – BoltClock
    Dec 18, 2010 at 23:46
  • That only works for string and int values, it won't work for objects, booleans and other arrays.
    – Danon
    Dec 9, 2022 at 10:03
  • Using array_combine() may not be suitable if the values which become keys are not compatible or become mutated when used as array keys. Dec 1, 2023 at 6:49
2

All fully tested

3 ways to create a dynamic dropdown from an array.

This will create a dropdown menu from an array and automatically assign its respective value.

Method #1 (Normal Array)

<?php

$names = array('tn'=>'Tunisia','us'=>'United States','fr'=>'France');

echo '<select name="countries">';

foreach($names AS $let=>$word){
    echo '<option value="'.$let.'">'.$word.'</option>';
}
echo '</select>';
 
?>


Method #2 (Normal Array)

<select name="countries">

<?php

$countries = array('tn'=> "Tunisia", "us"=>'United States',"fr"=>'France');
foreach($countries as $select=>$country_name){
echo '<option value="' . $select . '">' . $country_name . '</option>';
}
?>

</select>


Method #3 (Associative Array)

<?php

$my_array = array(
     'tn' => 'Tunisia',
     'us' => 'United States',
     'fr' => 'France'
);

echo '<select name="countries">';
echo '<option value="none">Select...</option>';
foreach ($my_array as $k => $v) {
    echo '<option value="' . $k . '">' . $v . '</option>';
}
echo '</select>';
?>
3
  • 1
    hm... downvote uncalled for. Downvoter, reason and care to elaborate? Obviously done "just cuz". Meh~ Nov 14, 2013 at 19:55
  • 5
    Aren't these all the same thing? I don't see any significant differences other than the names of the variables.
    – Patrick
    Apr 20, 2017 at 9:21
  • Using associative values limits the number of arrays iterated to 2. If the array of values used as keys contains values which are incompatible or mutated by PHP, then this approach is unsuitable. Dec 1, 2023 at 6:56
1

You can use array_merge to combine two arrays and then iterate over them.

$array1 = array("foo" => "bar");
$array2 = array("hello" => "world");
$both_arrays = array_merge((array)$array1, (array)$array2);
print_r($both_arrays);
1
  • This doesn't appear to have any relationship to the asked question. Dec 1, 2023 at 6:44
1

array_combine() worked great for me while combining $_POST multiple values from multiple form inputs in an attempt to update products quantities in a shopping cart.

1
  • Using array_combine() may not be suitable if the values which become keys are not compatible or become mutated when used as array keys. Dec 1, 2023 at 6:47
1
<?php

$codes = array ('tn','us','fr');
$names = array ('Tunisia','United States','France');

echo '<table>';

foreach(array_keys($codes) as $i) {

     echo '<tr><td>';
     echo ($i + 1);
     echo '</td><td>';
     echo $codes[$i];
     echo '</td><td>';
     echo $names[$i];
     echo '</td></tr>';
}

echo '</table>';

?>
1
  • This unexplained snippet makes an unnecessary call (array_keys()) then needs to use the $i variable to access each element from both arrays -- this is not the most elegant approach. Dec 1, 2023 at 6:45
1

foreach only works with a single array. To step through multiple arrays, it's better to use the each() function in a while loop:

while(($code = each($codes)) && ($name = each($names))) {
    echo '<option value="' . $code['value'] . '">' . $name['value'] . '</option>';
}

each() returns information about the current key and value of the array and increments the internal pointer by one, or returns false if it has reached the end of the array. This code would not be dependent upon the two arrays having identical keys or having the same sort of elements. The loop terminates when one of the two arrays is finished.

1
  • 1
    Too bad! This was perfect but deprecated from php 7 and removed from php 8.
    – Roemer
    May 27, 2022 at 3:28
1

Instead of foreach loop, try this (only when your arrays have same length).

$number = COUNT($_POST["codes "]);//count how many arrays available
if($number > 0)  
{  
  for($i=0; $i<$number; $i++)//loop thru each arrays
  {
    $codes =$_POST['codes'][$i];
    $names =$_POST['names'][$i];
    //ur code in here
  }
}
1
  • Using a foreach() means that you don't have to count the array and maintain a counter variable. A foreach() will not be entered if the count is 0. Dec 1, 2023 at 6:43
1

i gave a simple example


class Parallel implements Iterator
{
 
    private int $index;
 
    private array $arrays;
 
    private int $countAny;
 
    public function __construct(array ...$arrays)
    {
        $this->countAny = count($arrays[0]);
        $this->arrays = $arrays;
    }
 
    #[\Override]
    public function current(): array
    {
        $return = [];
        foreach ($this->arrays as $array) {
            $return[] = $array[$this->index];
        }
        return $return;
    }
 
    #[\Override]
    public function next(): void
    {
        $this->index++;
    }
 
    #[\Override]
    public function key(): mixed
    {
        return $this->index;
    }
 
    #[\Override]
    public function valid(): bool
    {
        return $this->index < $this->countAny;
    }
 
    #[\Override]
    public function rewind(): void
    {
        $this->index = 0;
    }
}
 
 
$parallel = new Parallel(
    [1, 2, 3, 4],
    ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd'],
    ['london', 'paris', 'rome', 'istanbul'],
);
 
foreach ($parallel as [$number, $word, $city]) {
    echo PHP_EOL;
    printf('Number: %s, Word: %s, City: %s', $number, $word, $city);
}

4
  • Where is the educational explanation with this snippet dump? Dec 1, 2023 at 6:22
  • Why should someone use tens of lines of code to do what the accepted answer can do in 3??? Dec 1, 2023 at 6:54
  • just for the reusable Dec 2, 2023 at 1:28
  • Please edit this answer to make it educational. Dec 2, 2023 at 8:37
0

I solved a problem like yours by this way:

foreach(array_keys($idarr) as $i) {
 echo "Student ID: ".$idarr[$i]."<br />";
 echo "Present: ".$presentarr[$i]."<br />";
 echo "Reason: ".$reasonarr[$i]."<br />";
 echo "Mark: ".$markarr[$i]."<br />";
}
1
  • This unexplained snippet makes an unnecessary call (array_keys()) then needs to use the $i variable to access each element from both arrays -- this is not the most elegant approach. Dec 1, 2023 at 6:49
0

You should try this for the putting 2 array in singlr foreach loop Suppose i have 2 Array 1.$item_nm 2.$item_qty

 `<?php $i=1; ?>
<table><tr><td>Sr.No</td> <td>item_nm</td>  <td>item_qty</td>    </tr>

  @foreach (array_combine($item_nm, $item_qty) as $item_nm => $item_qty)
<tr> 
        <td> $i++  </td>
        <td>  $item_nm  </td>
        <td> $item_qty  </td>
   </tr></table>

@endforeach `
1
  • Using array_combine() may not be suitable if the values which become keys are not compatible or become mutated when used as array keys. Dec 1, 2023 at 6:49
0

I think that you can do something like:

$codes = array('tn','us','fr');

$names = array('Tunisia','United States','France');

foreach ($codes as $key => $code) {
    echo '<option value="' . $code . '">' . $names[$key] . '</option>';
}

It should also work for associative arrays.

1
  • This advice was given many years earlier and adds no new value to the page. Dec 1, 2023 at 6:48
0

I think the simplest way is just to use the for loop this way:

$codes = array('tn','us','fr');
$names = array('Tunisia','United States','France');

for($i = 0; $i < sizeof($codes); $i++){
    echo '<option value="' . $codes[$i] . '">' . $names[$i] . '</option>';
}
3
  • Using a foreach() means that you don't have to count the array and maintain a counter variable. Dec 1, 2023 at 6:43
  • Yes, but if you need to access the same index in both arrays, there is no way to avoid it, even if you use a foreach() you will still need the key which is basically the index...
    – SeReGa
    Dec 1, 2023 at 20:11
  • Using a foreach() is the most elegant and concise way -- it automatically handles the changing of the key values, isn't limited to working with indexed arrays, and you only need to use the key to access the "other" array element because the value of the iterated array is more conveniently available by the foreach's value variable. Dec 1, 2023 at 22:13
0

En laravel Livewire

return view('you_name_view', compact('data','data2'));

@foreach ($data as $index => $data )

      <li>
          <span>{{$data}}</span>
          <span>{{$data2[$index]}}</span>
      </li>

@endforeach
1
  • The question is not asking how to write a loop in a blade/template. The crux of the advice (excluding the blade syntax changes) in this answer is already presented in the accepted answer. Dec 1, 2023 at 6:52
-1
if(isset($_POST['doors'])=== true){
$doors = $_POST['doors'];
}else{$doors = 0;}

if(isset($_POST['windows'])=== true){
$windows = $_POST['windows'];
}else{$windows = 0;}

foreach($doors as $a => $b){

Now you can use $a for each array....

$doors[$a]
$windows[$a]
....
}
1
  • This unexplained answer is not terribly clear and if it has any redeeming wisdom, those insights already exist in the accepted answer. Dec 1, 2023 at 6:53
-1

Few arrays can also be iterated like this:

foreach($array1 as $key=>$val){ // Loop though one array
    $val2 = $array2[$key]; // Get the values from the other arrays
    $val3 = $array3[$key];
    $result[] = array( //Save result in third array
      'id' => $val,
      'quant' => $val2,
      'name' => $val3,
    );
  }
1
  • Adding an extra array doesn't prevent this answer from being redundant -- the accepted answer offered this guidance many years earlier. Dec 1, 2023 at 6:50
-1

This will only work if the both array have same count.I try in laravel, for inserting both array in mysql db

$answer = {"0":"0","1":"1","2":"0","3":"0","4":"1"};
$reason_id = {"0":"17","1":"19","2":"15","3":"19","4":"18"};

        $k= (array)json_decode($answer);
        $x =(array)json_decode($reason_id);
        $number = COUNT(json_decode($reason_id, true));
        if($number > 0)  
        {  
        for($i=0; $i<$number; $i++)
        {
            $val = new ModelName();
            $val->reason_id  = $x[$i];
            $val->answer  =$k[$i];
            $val->save();
        }
        }
2
  • As it’s currently written, your answer is unclear. Please edit to add additional details that will help others understand how this addresses the question asked. You can find more information on how to write good answers in the help center.
    – Community Bot
    Oct 30, 2021 at 11:32
  • There is nothing unique and valuable in this answer. The advice to count, check if populated, then use a for() loop was already posted earlier. Dec 1, 2023 at 6:51
-1

To avoid referencing values by index and risking data corruption by using one array's values as keys via array_combine(), you can use array_map() to iterate two or more arrays at the same time.

Codes: (Demo)

  1. Implode an array populated with options tags without parameters in callabck signature:

    echo implode(
             "\n",
             array_map(
                 fn() => vsprintf('<option value="%s">%s</option>', func_get_args()),
                 $codes,
                 $names
             )
         );
    
  2. Implode an array populated with options by accumulating passed-in values with the spread operator:

    echo implode(
             "\n",
             array_map(
                 fn(...$values) => vsprintf('<option value="%s">%s</option>', $values),
                 $codes,
                 $names
             )
         );
    
  3. Transpose two or more arrays, then iterate and print the row data from the 2d array:

    foreach (array_map(null, $codes, $names) as $codeName) {
        vprintf('<option value="%s">%s</option>' . "\n", $codeName);
    }
    

Using printf() family functions voids concatenation and interpolation. When creating strings containing quotes, this can help your code to be more readable.

1
  • I always appreciate a good no-comment-vengeance vote. At least I had the courage to leave a comment explaining/justifying my actions. Dec 8, 2023 at 1:08
-2

it works for me

$counter = 0;
foreach($codes as $code)
{
$codes_array[$counter]=$code;
$counter++;
}
$counter = 0;
foreach($names as $name)
{
echo $codes_array[$counter]."and".$name;
$counter++;
}
1
  • The whole idea is that you don't need to write two separate loops. Dec 1, 2023 at 6:56

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