In the following example, why do f$i and f$get_i() return different results?

factory <- function() {

  my_list <- list()
  my_list$i <- 1

  my_list$increment <- function() {
    my_list$i <<- my_list$i + 1
  }

  my_list$get_i <- function() {
    my_list$i
  }

  my_list
}

f <- factory()

f$increment()
f$get_i() # returns 2
f$i # returns 1
  • 4
    aren't you just changing the value of my_list$i but not of f$i ? those are not the same variable. If my_list existed in global environment, its i parameter would be changed but you're not changing any item of f object – Cath Jun 29 '17 at 11:24
  • Thanks - yes, they are not the same variable, and that's what's surprising. I guess I'm trying to understand why they're not the same variable. The behaviour we see in R is different to what would happen in, say, javascript. – RobinL Jun 29 '17 at 11:38
  • sorry this is trivial answer but I still think it is the reason: it's just not the same name (though both "represent" the same variable) – Cath Jun 29 '17 at 11:40
  • 2
    This seems to be related to R's copy by value behaviour, whereby objects (like lists) are always copied rather than passed around by reference. In many programming languages, f and my_list would be the same thing (i.e. they would both point to the same location in memory). In R, it seems that the operation of returning my_list from the function factory actually makes a copy of it. – RobinL Jun 29 '17 at 11:42
  • 1
    it's more that inside function, you work with "temporary" variables, that exist only in the function environment. Actually, you're not supposed to use <<- as it can have very undesired behaviour (or at least be quite confusing like in your case). – Cath Jun 29 '17 at 12:05
up vote 4 down vote accepted

The way you code is very similar to the functional paradigm. R is more often used as a script language. So unless you exactly know what you are doing, it is bad practice to use <<- or to include functions in a functions.

You can find the explanation here at the function environment chapter.

Environment is a space/frame where your code is executed. Environment can be nested, in the same way functions are.

When creating a function, you have an enclosure environment attached which can be called by environment. This is the enclosing environment.

The function is executed in another environment, the execution environment with the fresh start principle. The execution environment is a children environment of the enclosing environment.

For exemple, on my laptop:

> environment()
<environment: R_GlobalEnv>
> environment(f$increment)
<environment: 0x0000000022365d58>
> environment(f$get_i)
<environment: 0x0000000022365d58>

f is an object located in the global environment.

The function increment has the enclosing environment 0x0000000022365d58 attached, the execution environment of the function factory.

I quote from Hadley:

When you create a function inside another function, the enclosing environment of the child function is the execution environment of the parent, and the execution environment is no longer ephemeral.

When the function f is executed, the enclosing environments are created with the my_list object in it.

That can be assessed with the ls command:

> ls(envir = environment(f$increment))
[1] "my_list"
> ls(envir = environment(f$get_i))
[1] "my_list"

The <<- operator is searching in the parents environments for the variables used. In that case, the my_list object found is the one in the immediate upper environment which is the enclosing environment of the function.

So when an increment is made, it is made only in that environment and not in the global.

You can see it by replacing the increment function by that:

  my_list$increment <- function() {
    print("environment")
    print(environment())
    print("Parent environment")
    print(parent.env(environment()))
    my_list$i <<- my_list$i + 1
  }

It give me:

> f$increment()
[1] "environment"
<environment: 0x0000000013c18538>
[1] "Parent environment"
<environment: 0x0000000022365d58>

You can use get to access to your result once you have stored the environment name:

> my_main_env <- environment(f$increment)
> get("my_list", env = my_main_env)
$i
[1] 2

$increment
function () 
{
    print("environment")
    print(environment())
    print("Parent environment")
    print(parent.env(environment()))
    my_list$i <<- my_list$i + 1
}
<environment: 0x0000000022365d58>

$get_i
function () 
{
    print("environment")
    print(environment())
    print("Parent environment")
    print(parent.env(environment()))
    my_list$i
}
<environment: 0x0000000022365d58>
  • Thanks. Is the final bit to round out this explanation that 'when my_list is returned from factory and assigned to f, it exists as a list in the global environment and no longer has access to factory's environment (closure). Changes to factory's environment cannot affect f because there is no link. We can still change the my_list in factory's environment is through the use of <<- within the my_list$increment function, but the only way to access to this environment is through an explicit getter function like my_list$get_i – RobinL Jun 29 '17 at 12:55
  • That's totally correct. – YCR Jun 29 '17 at 13:06
f <- factory()

creates my_list object with my_list$i = 1 and assigns it to f. So now f$i = 1.

f$increment() 

increments my_list$i only. It does not affect f.

Now

f$get_i() 

returns (previously incremented) my_list$i while

f$i 

returns unaffected f$i

It' because you used <<- operator that operates on global objects. If you change your code to

my_list$increment <- function(inverse) {
    my_list$i <- my_list$i + 1
}

my_list will be incremented only inside increment function. So now you get

> f$get_i() 
[1] 1
> f$i 
[1] 1

Let me add a one more line to your code, so we could see increment's intestines:

 my_list$increment <- function(inverse) {
    my_list$i <- my_list$i + 1
    return(my_list$i)
  }

Now, you can see that <- operates only inside increment while <<- operated outside of it.

> f <- factory()
> f$increment()
[1] 2
> f$get_i() 
[1] 1
> f$i
[1] 1
  • Thank you. I understand that f$increment() affects my_list and not f, but I don't know why. The my_list within the closure is a different my_list to that which is returned (and then assigned to f). Is this because R always uses reference by value, so what is returned by the factory function is not a reference to my_list in the closure, but a copy of my_list? – RobinL Jun 29 '17 at 11:36
  • See updated answer :) – Łukasz Deryło Jun 29 '17 at 11:45
  • The next question could probably be - how to have a truly "global" my_list$i inside f. – Roman Luštrik Jun 29 '17 at 11:47
  • I don't know how. I don't know what for. :) – Łukasz Deryło Jun 29 '17 at 11:51
  • 1
    I understand that <<- searches in the environment 'one level up' from the function. So in the original code my_list$i <<- my_list$i + 1 means that the increment function can access the my_list variable in the scope of the factory function. I guess the bit I don't really understand is why ' f$increment() increments my_list$i only. It does not affect f.' – RobinL Jun 29 '17 at 11:57

Based on comments from @Cath on "value by reference", I was inspired to come up with this.

library(data.table)
factory <- function() {
   my_list <- list()
   my_list$i <- data.table(1)

   my_list$increment <- function(inverse) {
     my_list$i[ j = V1:=V1+1]
  }

   my_list$get_i <- function() {
     my_list$i
   }
   my_list
 }
f <- factory()
f$increment()
f$get_i() # returns 2
   V1
1:  2
f$i # returns 1
   V1
1:  2
f$increment()
f$get_i() # returns 2
   V1
1:  3
f$i # returns 1
   V1
1:  3

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