How can I synchronously check, using node.js, if a file or directory exists?

  • 50
    Synchronous operations are great for performing one-time file/directory operations before returning a module. For example, bootstrapping a configuration file. – jocull Jul 13 '16 at 19:17
  • @PaulDraper with a warm cache isn't true in all cases. – mikemaccana Aug 17 '17 at 20:10
  • 6
    No matter the performances, sometimes you just want to run it in a sync way for developer experience. For example, if you are using Node for a data processing script which should by design be blocking, in that case async exists just adds unnecessary callbacks. – Kunok Dec 18 '17 at 15:35
  • Definitely +1 to Kunok's statement. In the rest of my code I only make code more complex when it's a bottleneck where the speed really matters. Why wouldn't I apply that principle to file reading? In many parts of many programs code simplicity/readability can be more important than execution speed. If it's a bottleneck area I'll use async methods to keep from stopping further code execution. Otherwise...sync is great. Don't blindly hate sync. – BryanGrezeszak Feb 17 at 16:13
  • 2
    Please... not "worth noting" because user asks explicitly how to do it synchronously. – jClark Mar 20 at 18:34

13 Answers 13

up vote 1750 down vote accepted

The answer to this question has changed over the years. The current answer is here at the top, followed by the various answers over the years in chronological order:

Current Answer

You can use fs.existsSync():

var fs = require('fs');
if (fs.existsSync(path)) {
    // Do something
}

It was deprecated for several years, but no longer is. From the docs:

Note that fs.exists() is deprecated, but fs.existsSync() is not. (The callback parameter to fs.exists() accepts parameters that are inconsistent with other Node.js callbacks. fs.existsSync() does not use a callback.)

You've specifically asked for a synchronous check, but if you can use an asynchronous check instead (usually best with I/O), use fs.access (since exists is deprecated).


Historical Answers

Here are the historical answers in chronological order:

  • Original answer from 2010
    (stat/statSync or lstat/lstatSync)
  • Update September 2012
    (exists/existsSync)
  • Update February 2015
    (Noting impending deprecation of exists/existsSync, so we're probably back to stat/statSync or lstat/lstatSync)
  • Update December 2015
    (There's also fs.access(path, fs.F_OK, function(){}) / fs.accessSync(path, fs.F_OK), but note that if the file/directory doesn't exist, it's an error; docs for fs.stat recommend using fs.access if you need to check for existence without opening)
  • Update December 2016
    fs.exists() is still deprecated but fs.existsSync() is no longer deprecated. So you can safely use it now.

Original answer from 2010:

You can use statSync or lstatSync (docs link), which give you an fs.Stats object. In general, if a synchronous version of a function is available, it will have the same name as the async version with Sync at the end. So statSync is the synchronous version of stat; lstatSync is the synchronous version of lstat, etc.

lstatSync tells you both whether something exists, and if so, whether it's a file or a directory (or in some file systems, a symbolic link, block device, character device, etc.), e.g. if you need to know if it exists and is a directory:

var fs = require('fs');
try {
    // Query the entry
    stats = fs.lstatSync('/the/path');

    // Is it a directory?
    if (stats.isDirectory()) {
        // Yes it is
    }
}
catch (e) {
    // ...
}

...and similarly if it's a file, there's isFile; if it's a block device, there's isBlockDevice, etc., etc. Note the try/catch; it throws an error if the entry doesn't exist at all.

If you don't care what the entry is and only want to know whether it exists, you can use path.existsSync (or with latest, fs.existsSync) as noted by user618408:

var path = require('path');
if (path.existsSync("/the/path")) { // or fs.existsSync
    // ...
}

It doesn't require a try/catch, but gives you no information about what the thing is, just that it's there. path.existsSync was deprecated long ago.


Side note: You've expressly asked how to check synchronously, so I've used the xyzSync versions of the functions above. But wherever possible, with I/O, it really is best to avoid synchronous calls. Calls into the I/O subsystem take significant time from a CPU's point of view. Note how easy it is to call lstat rather than lstatSync:

// Is it a directory?
lstat('/the/path', function(err, stats) {
    if (!err && stats.isDirectory()) {
        // Yes it is
    }
});

But if you need the synchronous version, it's there.

Update September 2012

The below answer from a couple of years ago is now a bit out of date. The current way is to use fs.existsSync to do a synchronous check for file/directory existence (or of course fs.exists for an asynchronous check), rather than the path versions below.

Example:

var fs = require('fs');

if (fs.existsSync(path)) {
    // Do something
}

// Or

fs.exists(path, function(exists) {
    if (exists) {
        // Do something
    }
});

Update February 2015

And here we are in 2015 and the Node docs now say that fs.existsSync (and fs.exists) "will be deprecated". (Because the Node folks think it's dumb to check whether something exists before opening it, which it is; but that's not the only reason for checking whether something exists!)

So we're probably back to the various stat methods... Until/unless this changes yet again, of course.

Update December 2015

Don't know how long it's been there, but there's also fs.access(path, fs.F_OK, ...) / fs.accessSync(path, fs.F_OK). And at least as of October 2016, the fs.stat documentation recommends using fs.access to do existence checks ("To check if a file exists without manipulating it afterwards, fs.access() is recommended."). But note that the access not being available is considered an error, so this would probably be best if you're expecting the file to be accessible:

var fs = require('fs');

try {
    fs.accessSync(path, fs.F_OK);
    // Do something
} catch (e) {
    // It isn't accessible
}

// Or

fs.access(path, fs.F_OK, function(err) {
    if (!err) {
        // Do something
    } else {
        // It isn't accessible
    }
});

Update December 2016

You can use fs.existsSync():

if (fs.existsSync(path)) {
    // Do something
}

It was deprecated for several years, but no longer is. From the docs:

Note that fs.exists() is deprecated, but fs.existsSync() is not. (The callback parameter to fs.exists() accepts parameters that are inconsistent with other Node.js callbacks. fs.existsSync() does not use a callback.)

  • 28
    If file doesn't exist, statSync triggers an error. – Ragnis Dec 19 '10 at 11:28
  • 111
    I haven't even read the answer yet but I've upvoted this answer. An answer being updated since 5 years... It deserves +1! – scaryguy Apr 11 '15 at 2:23
  • 12
    "Node folks think it's dumb to check whether something exists before opening it, which it is;" Why is it dumb to check if file exists? – Petr Hurtak Jun 20 '15 at 18:25
  • 27
    @PetrHurtak: It isn't always (because there are lots of reasons for checking existance), but if you're going to open the file, it's best to just issue the open call and handle the exception or whatever if the file wasn't found. After all, the real world is chaotic: If you check first and it's there, that doesn't mean it'll still be there when you try to open it; if you check first and it isn't there, that doesn't mean it won't be there a moment later. Timing things like that seem like edge cases, but they come up all the time. So if you're going to open, no point in checking first. – T.J. Crowder Jun 20 '15 at 18:43
  • 9
    And here I thought it was an anti-pattern to use errors for control flow: link – jeromeyers Jul 16 '15 at 21:42

Looking at the source, there's a synchronous version of path.exists - path.existsSync. Looks like it got missed in the docs.

Update:

path.exists and path.existsSync are now deprecated. Please use fs.exists and fs.existsSync.

Update 2016:

fs.exists and fs.existsSync have also been deprecated. Use fs.stat() or fs.access() instead.

Using the currently recommended (as of 2015) APIs (per the Node docs), this is what I do:

var fs = require('fs');

function fileExists(filePath)
{
    try
    {
        return fs.statSync(filePath).isFile();
    }
    catch (err)
    {
        return false;
    }
}

In response to the EPERM issue raised by @broadband in the comments, that brings up a good point. fileExists() is probably not a good way to think about this in many cases, because fileExists() can't really promise a boolean return. You may be able to determine definitively that the file exists or doesn't exist, but you may also get a permissions error. The permissions error doesn't necessarily imply that the file exists, because you could lack permission to the directory containing the file on which you are checking. And of course there is the chance you could encounter some other error in checking for file existence.

So my code above is really doesFileExistAndDoIHaveAccessToIt(), but your question might be doesFileNotExistAndCouldICreateIt(), which would be completely different logic (that would need to account for an EPERM error, among other things).

While the fs.existsSync answer addresses the question asked here directly, that is often not going to be what you want (you don't just want to know if "something" exists at a path, you probably care about whether the "thing" that exists is a file or a directory).

The bottom line is that if you're checking to see if a file exists, you are probably doing that because you intend to take some action based on the result, and that logic (the check and/or subsequent action) should accommodate the idea that a thing found at that path may be a file or a directory, and that you may encounter EPERM or other errors in the process of checking.

  • 3
    Nice, I added || isDirectory() to make it a file/folder checker. var stats = fs.statSync(filePath);return stats.isFile() || stats.isDirectory(); – bob Oct 9 '15 at 5:37
  • 2
    If program doesn't have rights to access the file it still returns false even though file exists i.e. remove all rigts from file chmod ugo-rwx file.txt or in Windows Right Click ... Exception message: Exception fs.statSync (./f.txt): Error: EPERM: operation not permitted, stat 'X:\f.txt'. So this case isn't covered by upper code. – broadband Jan 26 '16 at 14:28
  • Wow, JS is retarded sometimes. So sure, 97% of the time you will be using the file, but not having a simple file.exists() util for the 3% and instead forcing us to wrap this in a try catch? Get real... Bitch of the day. – expelledboy Oct 1 '16 at 10:35

Another Update

Needing an answer to this question myself I looked up the node docs, seems you should not be using fs.exists, instead use fs.open and use outputted error to detect if a file does not exist:

from the docs:

fs.exists() is an anachronism and exists only for historical reasons. There should almost never be a reason to use it in your own code.

In particular, checking if a file exists before opening it is an anti-pattern that leaves you vulnerable to race conditions: another process may remove the file between the calls to fs.exists() and fs.open(). Just open the file and handle the error when it's not there.

http://nodejs.org/api/fs.html#fs_fs_exists_path_callback

  • is there a way to do it with openSync, rather than open – Greg Hornby Feb 26 '15 at 6:14
  • @GregHornby I imagine it should work the same way with openSync – Melbourne2991 Feb 26 '15 at 14:26
  • 1
    For those that still need exists and existsSync I created is-there. – Ionică Bizău Feb 27 '15 at 12:10
  • 5
    This deprecation bugs me. Opening a file just to see if an error is thrown or not seems like a waste of resources when all that's needed is knowledge of the file's existence. – Josh Hansen Mar 7 '15 at 0:41

I use below function to test if file exists. It catches also other exceptions. So in case there are rights issues e.g. chmod ugo-rwx filename or in Windows Right Click -> Properties -> Security -> Advanced -> Permission entries: empty list .. function returns exception as it should. The file exists but we don't have rights to access it. It would be wrong to ignore this kinds of exceptions.

function fileExists(path) {

  try  {
    return fs.statSync(path).isFile();
  }
  catch (e) {

    if (e.code == 'ENOENT') { // no such file or directory. File really does not exist
      console.log("File does not exist.");
      return false;
    }

    console.log("Exception fs.statSync (" + path + "): " + e);
    throw e; // something else went wrong, we don't have rights, ...
  }
}

Exception output, nodejs errors documentation in case file doesn't exist:

{
  [Error: ENOENT: no such file or directory, stat 'X:\\delsdfsdf.txt']
  errno: -4058,
  code: 'ENOENT',
  syscall: 'stat',
  path: 'X:\\delsdfsdf.txt'
}

Exception in case we don't have rights to the file, but exists:

{
  [Error: EPERM: operation not permitted, stat 'X:\file.txt']
  errno: -4048,
  code: 'EPERM',
  syscall: 'stat',
  path: 'X:\\file.txt'
}
  • 1
    Really like this, it's one of the few answers that's up to date since node has deprecated the last 37 ways of doing this – 1mike12 Jul 28 '16 at 5:41
  • Bah, you beat me to it. I could have saved some time if I had read this. – jgmjgm Nov 12 '17 at 19:59

fs.exists() is deprecated dont use it https://nodejs.org/api/fs.html#fs_fs_exists_path_callback

You could implement the core nodejs way used at this: https://github.com/nodejs/node-v0.x-archive/blob/master/lib/module.js#L86

function statPath(path) {
  try {
    return fs.statSync(path);
  } catch (ex) {}
  return false;
}

this will return the stats object then once you've got the stats object you could try

var exist = statPath('/path/to/your/file.js');
if(exist && exist.isFile()) {
  // do something
}

Some answers here says that fs.exists and fs.existsSync are both deprecated. According to the docs this is no more true. Only fs.exists is deprected now:

Note that fs.exists() is deprecated, but fs.existsSync() is not. (The callback parameter to fs.exists() accepts parameters that are inconsistent with other Node.js callbacks. fs.existsSync() does not use a callback.)

So you can safely use fs.existsSync() to synchronously check if a file exists.

The path module does not provide a synchronous version of path.exists so you have to trick around with the fs module.

Fastest thing I can imagine is using fs.realpathSync which will throw an error that you have to catch, so you need to make your own wrapper function with a try/catch.

Using fileSystem (fs) tests will trigger error objects, which you then would need to wrap in a try/catch statement. Save yourself some effort, and use a feature introduce in the 0.4.x branch.

var path = require('path');

var dirs = ['one', 'two', 'three'];

dirs.map(function(dir) {
  path.exists(dir, function(exists) {
    var message = (exists) ? dir + ': is a directory' : dir + ': is not a directory';
    console.log(message);
  });
});
  • 1
    The path.exists is now under fs so it is fs.exists(path, callback) – Todd Moses Dec 15 '13 at 17:05

The documents on fs.stat() says to use fs.access() if you are not going to manipulate the file. It did not give a justification, might be faster or less memeory use?

I use node for linear automation, so I thought I share the function I use to test for file existence.

var fs = require("fs");

function exists(path){
    //Remember file access time will slow your program.
    try{
        fs.accessSync(path);
    } catch (err){
        return false;
    }
    return true;
}

Here is a simple wrapper solution for this:

var fs = require('fs')
function getFileRealPath(s){
    try {return fs.realpathSync(s);} catch(e){return false;}
}

Usage:

  • Works for both directories and files
  • If item exists, it returns the path to the file or directory
  • If item does not exist, it returns false

Example:

var realPath,pathToCheck='<your_dir_or_file>'
if( (realPath=getFileRealPath(pathToCheck)) === false){
    console.log('file/dir not found: '+pathToCheck);
} else {
    console.log('file/dir exists: '+realPath);
}

Make sure you use === operator to test if return equals false. There is no logical reason that fs.realpathSync() would return false under proper working conditions so I think this should work 100%.

I would prefer to see a solution that does not does not generate an Error and resulting performance hit. From an API perspective, fs.exists() seems like the most elegant solution.

  • @Dan, thanks. I removed the truncated text. I cannot recall what the note was. If it comes me I will add notes. – Timothy C. Quinn Oct 4 '15 at 14:41
  • Np. I'm deleting my comment. – Dan Dascalescu Oct 5 '15 at 7:33

Async Promise solution (bluebirdjs)

For those using bluebirdjs and nodejs 7. The best way to return a boolean promise:

function fileExists(path){
  return fs.accessAsync(path, fs.constants.F_OK) //F_OK checks if file is visible, is default does no need to be specified.
         .then(err => !err);
}

the docs: https://nodejs.org/api/fs.html#fs_fs_access_path_mode_callback

  • the OP wants a synchronous solution – vdegenne Apr 5 at 14:17

From the answers it appears that there is no official API support for this (as in a direct and explicit check). Many of the answers say to use stat, however they are not strict. We can't assume for example that any error thrown by stat means that something doesn't exist.

Lets say we try it with something that doesn't exist:

$ node -e 'require("fs").stat("god",err=>console.log(err))'
{ Error: ENOENT: no such file or directory, stat 'god' errno: -2, code: 'ENOENT', syscall: 'stat', path: 'god' }

Lets try it with something that exists but that we don't have access to:

$ mkdir -p fsm/appendage && sudo chmod 0 fsm
$ node -e 'require("fs").stat("fsm/appendage",err=>console.log(err))'
{ Error: EACCES: permission denied, stat 'access/access' errno: -13, code: 'EACCES', syscall: 'stat', path: 'fsm/appendage' }

At the very least you'll want:

let dir_exists = async path => {
    let stat;
    try {
       stat = await (new Promise(
           (resolve, reject) => require('fs').stat(path,
               (err, result) => err ? reject(err) : resolve(result))
       ));
    }
    catch(e) {
        if(e.code === 'ENOENT') return false;
        throw e;
    }

    if(!stat.isDirectory())
        throw new Error('Not a directory.');

    return true;
};

The question question is not clear on if you actually want it to be syncronous or if you only want it to be written as though it is syncronous. This example uses await/async so that it is only written syncronously but runs asyncronously.

This means you have to call it as such at the top level:

(async () => {
    try {
        console.log(await dir_exists('god'));
        console.log(await dir_exists('fsm/appendage'));
    }
    catch(e) {
        console.log(e);
    }
})();

An alternative is using .then and .catch on the promise returned from the async call if you need it further down.

If you want to check if something exists then it's a good practice to also ensure it's the right type of thing such as a directory or file. This is included in the example. If it's not allowed to be a symlink you must use lstat instead of stat as stat will automatically traverse links.

You can replace all of the async to sync code in here and use statSync instead. However expect that once async and await become universally supports the Sync calls will become redundant eventually to be depreciated (otherwise you would have to define them everywhere and up the chain just like with async making it really pointless).

  • require('fs').statSync(path) is more readable anyways.Also the OP doesn't obviously care if it's a file or directory. marked as off topic – vdegenne Apr 5 at 14:13
  • The original question does not specify that. I am also demonstrating how to do things unambiguously. Many answers might induce bugs due to lack of clarity. People often want to program things so it appears syncronous but don't necessarily want synchronous execution. statSync is not the same as the code I've demonstrated. Either accounts of what's actually desired are ambiguous, so you're only imposing your personal interpretations. If you find an answer you don't understand it might be better to simply ask in the comments or PM to work out what edits are needed. – jgmjgm Apr 5 at 14:55
  • If you want you can also steal my code sample, name it appropriately, put it on github, add it to npm and then the answer will only be one line/link :D. – jgmjgm Apr 5 at 14:59
  • Why would I want to steal your code just when I can make it stand in one line already ? I was just pointing the fact that the OP didn't narrow his request to directories. Therefore your answer is out of scope and violating the SO guidelines. – vdegenne Apr 5 at 17:35
  • The code is short for sake of example but you're welcome to submit an edit suggestion to include && !isFile or a check for symlinks, etc (again though the question never explicitly states even that is what they want). As I have already pointed out my answer satisfies one interpretation of the question and does not do the same thing your one line proposal does. – jgmjgm Apr 10 at 18:16

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