22

Consider a library where you have some code. For example let's do some point X and Y manipulation.

And then you build your library where you don't want to allow users to access to your struct variable, so far I'm using this approach and it seems to work ok.

lib.h:

#ifndef __LIB_H
#define __LIB_H

#ifdef __LIB_INTERNAL
//Structure for single point
typedef struct {
    int x, y;
} Point;

//Casted pointer
#define _P(in)      ((Point *)(in))
#endif

//Define pointer for public use as void pointer
typedef void* Point_p;

//Create point
Point_p createPoint(int x, int y);

#endif

lib.c:

//Define LIB_INTERNAL to allow visible access
#define __LIB_INTERNAL
#include "lib.h"
#include "stdlib.h"

Point_p createPoint(int x, int y) {
    Point_p p = malloc(sizeof(Point));
    _P(p)->x = x; //_P is visible in this function
    _P(p)->y = y;
    return p;
}

main.c:

#include "lib.h"

int main() {
    Point_p p = createPoint(1, 2); //OK
    Point *ptr = createPoint(1, 2); //Error as Point is not visible public

    p->x = 4; //Error as Point_p is void *
}

This way I'm making sure that user don't have direct access to Point variable and it is forced to use functions to perform operations on this point.


Now I'm thinking of another approach. But first, sizeof(void *) and sizeof(Point *) is always the same so I would like to use this approach by showing Point_p to lib.c as typedef Point* Point_p and to all other files which are not part of library as typedef void* Point_p.

lib.h

#ifndef __LIB_H
#define __LIB_H

#ifdef __LIB_INTERNAL
//Structure for single point
typedef struct {
    int x, y;
} Point;

//Define pointer for private use as Point pointer
typedef Point* Point_p;

#else

//Define pointer for public use as void pointer
typedef void* Point_p;

#endif


//Create point
Point_p createPoint(int x, int y);

#endif

lib.c:

//Define LIB_INTERNAL to allow visible access
#define __LIB_INTERNAL
#include "lib.h"
#include "stdlib.h"

Point_p createPoint(int x, int y) {
    Point_p p = malloc(sizeof(Point));
    p->x = x; //_P is not needed because Point_p is visible as Point *
    p->y = y;
    return p;
}

main.c: the same as previous


Question

Is this undefined behavior? Because in second approach, lib.c sees Point_p as Point *, but main.c still sees it as void * and therefore lib.c has access to members directly without casting before and main.c does not have it neither can cast because Point structure is hidden.

13
  • 4
    First approach Point_p p = malloc(sizeof(*p)); is wrong because void has no size. Jun 29, 2017 at 15:21
  • 1
    There is no discussion here. The behavior is obviously defined, exactly as you think it is. Jun 29, 2017 at 15:22
  • @Jean-BaptisteYunès I agree. Was writing code from head. I fixed it. Jun 29, 2017 at 15:23
  • 2
    I would recommend having two completely different headers: one for the library with the full structure specced out, the other for users of the binary distro, with the opaque type, if you are that concerned about users knowing about your type. Jun 29, 2017 at 15:24
  • 1
    @tilz0R I wasn't saying that this is or is not undefined behavior. Just that you can't definitively state that there isn't undefined behavior merely by observing the effects, since anything that defined behavior can do, undefined behavior can also do. Including the "correct" thing.
    – Ray
    Jun 29, 2017 at 21:21

2 Answers 2

25

Yes, it is. Struct pointers are not guaranteed to have the same representation as void pointers.

However, all struct pointers are guaranteed to have the same representation regardless of tag,

6.2.5p28:

... All pointers to structure types shall have the same representation and alignment requirements as each other. All pointers to union types shall have the same representation and alignment requirements as each other. ...

so the common, well-defined way to solve this is to only provide a forward declaration of a struct in the public header and then use pointers to that.

public_header.h

struct Point; //the private header provides the full definition
struct Point* createPoint(int x, int y);
//...

private_header:

#include "public_header.h"
struct Point { int x, y; }; //full definition

That approach also doesn't suffer from the type-looseness of void pointers.

(You should also avoid using identifiers starting with two underscores or an underscore and an uppercase letter as well as filescope identifiers/tags that start with an underscore (don't ever start identifiers with an underscore if you want to keep it simple)—that's undefined behavior too (See 7.1.3 Reserved Identifiers)).

14
  • 1
    First sentence: may be, but every pointer value can be transtyped to void pointer and back. Jun 29, 2017 at 15:26
  • 2
    @Jean-BaptisteYunès. While casting the pointers will be fine, passing an object formatted as a void pointer to a function expecting a struct pointer will cause issues if the representations are not identical. Jun 29, 2017 at 15:30
  • 3
    @Jean-BaptisteYunès All data (not function pointers) pointers convert to void pointers without the need for an explicit cast, but that doesn't mean they can be directly reinterpreted as void pointers or vice versa. The representations are allowed to be different (though they very likely won't be). Jun 29, 2017 at 15:33
  • 2
    @Jean-BaptisteYunès That's OK, but you shouldn't declare T *p; with external linkage in one source and then refer to it as void *p in another. Jun 29, 2017 at 15:46
  • 1
    @Jean-BaptisteYunès supposing that a struct pointer and a void pointer have different representations, the compiler can convert between them (it's required that they are convertible), but only if it can see both types to know that it has to. If one compilation unit only sees void * and the other only sees struct Point *, and one calls a function defined in the other, one puts a void * on the arguments list and the other tries to take a struct Point * out, the wrong thing is nearly guaranteed to happen if those representations differ.
    – hobbs
    Jun 30, 2017 at 1:59
11

I'm using this approach so far and it works just ok without any undefined behaviour

I suppose you mean that the code you present exhibits the observable behavior you expect under the circumstances in which you have tested it, which is quite a different thing from being without undefined behavior. Certainly, the code as you originally posted it absolutely had undefined behavior as a result of applying the sizeof operator to an expression of type void.

But first, sizeof(void *) and sizeof(Point *) is always the same

C does not guarantee that, nor that the representations of those pointer types are equivalent. You can, however, safely convert a Point * to a void * and back, where "safely" means that the result will compare equal to the original Point *.

I would like to use this approach by showing Point_p to lib.c as typedef Point* Point_p and to all other files which are not part of library as typedef void* Point_p.

This is not safe and formally would exhibit undefined behavior, which might or might not manifest in a way that you notice. Even though you can convert between them, Point * and void * are not "compatible" types in the standard's sense of the term.

A better pattern for implementing opaque types in C is to use incomplete types. That would look something like this:

lib.h:

// User header for lib
#ifndef __LIB_H
#define __LIB_H

// Structure for a single point -- NO BODY DECLARED
typedef struct point Point;

// Create point
Point *createPoint(int x, int y);

#endif

lib.c:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include "lib.h"

// complete the definition of struct point
struct point {
    int x, y;
};

Point *createPoint(int x, int y) {
    Point *p = malloc(sizeof(*p));
    p->x = x;
    p->y = y;
    return p;
}

With that, you don't have any messy macros controlling what parts of the header should be used, and you don't even have to worry about client code just declaring __LIB_INTERNAL to get access to the structure members, because they aren't in the header at all. This all nevertheless has perfectly well-defined behavior, and, moreover, better type safety than does using void * for everything.

4
  • Yes, that was my though too after first answer. Thanks for posting. Btw..there is no UB in my default code as sizeof has never type void, but structure itself. Jun 29, 2017 at 15:47
  • If you need to share the structure declaration between multiple library sources, you can always extract it into a private header. Jun 29, 2017 at 17:46
  • Yes, @MadPhysicist, indeed so. I had supposed that was a natural and obvious extension. As long as you bring it up, however, I'll add that if one does create a private header for such a purpose, it should not be installed or distributed with the library binary. That would be inconsistent with it being private, and would undermine the opacity of the data structure. Jun 29, 2017 at 18:18
  • @JohnBollinger. I meant the comment as an addendum for anyone reading the answer rather than a claim that you were missing anything. I like how you incorporated it into your answer. Jun 29, 2017 at 18:20

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