-1

I wrote a C# program to print the area, but when I run the program it always prints "The area is 0". Any idea what seems to be the problem?

    class Circle
{
    double radius;
  //  int color;
    double area;

    public void setCircleInfo()

    {
        radius = 15;
        //color = 225;
    }

    public void calculateArea()
    {
        area = 3.142 * radius * radius;
    }

    public double getRadius()
    {
        return radius;
    }

    public void displayArea()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("The area is " + area.ToString());
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}
}

Here's the code to the main method:

{
class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Circle obj1 = new Circle();
        obj1.displayArea();

    }
}
}
  • 4
    Did you called calculateArea any where in the code that uses Circle object? – dcg Jun 29 '17 at 15:14
  • If you never call calculateArea() then area will always be 0 – maccettura Jun 29 '17 at 15:14
  • 3
    You don't show any code for a "runnable program", where is main? – crashmstr Jun 29 '17 at 15:14
  • 1
    Where's the main method? – Aakash Verma Jun 29 '17 at 15:15
  • 1
    Think about this: since you have no constructor, what values will radius and area have when a new object is constructed? – crashmstr Jun 29 '17 at 15:26
4

Your code runs fine for me. The reason why you are always getting The area is 0 is probably you are missing any one of the following calls. Note that If you miss setCircleInfo or calculateArea, you will get a zero as the result.

Circle c = new Circle();
c.setCircleInfo();
c.calculateArea();
c.displayArea();

Hope this helps :-)

  • Do I have to call all the methods always? – Chandima Gayan Jun 29 '17 at 15:22
  • 3
    @ChandimaGayan why don't you try it yourself? Experiment a bit. It'll only take you a few minutes. – PJvG Jun 29 '17 at 15:23
  • @ChandimaGayan Yes. Look at what each method does and think about the values of those variables if you do not call them. Just try that in a small console project or use tools like LinqPad. The habit of testing you code in small isolated environments will help you in the long run. – James Poulose Jun 29 '17 at 15:24
  • @james-poulose Thanks, the program works fine now. I didn't know I have to call all the methods for it to work. So in the main method, any method that is used in the class has to be called in the main right? – Chandima Gayan Jun 29 '17 at 15:27
  • @ChandimaGayan - No, you don't always HAVE to call all methods. Call it only if you need it. e.g. If you want to display the result, only then call 'displayArea'. – James Poulose Jun 29 '17 at 15:35
2

I would adjust the object a little bit to make it easier to use:

class Circle
{
    public double Radius
    {
        get;
        set;
    }

    public double Area
    {
        get
        {
            return 3.142 * radius * radius;
        }
    }

    public Circle(double radius)
    {
        Radius = radius;
    }

    public void displayArea()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("The area is " + Area.ToString());
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

You can then use it like this:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    Circle obj1 = new Circle(15);
    obj1.displayArea();
}
0

Change your code

static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Circle obj1 = new Circle();
        obj1.setCircleInfo();
        obj1.calculateArea();
        obj1.displayArea();

    }
-2

add in your Circle constructor method:

public Circle(double radius){
this.radius=radius;
c.setCircleInfo();
c.calculateArea();
c.displayArea();
}

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