83

I am creating a reusable library using .NET Core (targeting .NETStandard 1.4) and I am using Entity Framework Core (and new to both). I have an entity class that looks like:

public class Campaign
{
    [Key]
    public Guid Id { get; set; }

    [Required]
    [MaxLength(50)]
    public string Name { get; set; }

    public JObject ExtendedData { get; set; }
}

and I have a DbContext class that defines the DbSet:

public DbSet<Campaign> Campaigns { get; set; }

(I am also using the Repository pattern with DI, but I don't think that is relevant.)

My unit tests give me this error:

System.InvalidOperationException: Unable to determine the relationship represented by navigation property 'JToken.Parent' of type 'JContainer'. Either manually configure the relationship, or ignore this property from the model..

Is there a way to indicate that this is not a relationship but should be stored as a big string?

3
  • I think you should change the type of ExtendedData to string and then store the stringified JSON – Michael Jun 29 '17 at 15:53
  • 1
    @Michael I thought about that but I'd like to ensure that it is always valid JSON. – Alex Jun 29 '17 at 16:00
  • @Alex - If that is the only concern to check if it is valid JSON, for simplicity you could add a parsing to the set-method of your property (i.e. try to deserialize it) - and throw an InvalidDataException or an JsonSerializationException if it is not valid. – Matt Jul 3 '20 at 8:54

10 Answers 10

162

Going to answer this one differently.

Ideally the domain model should have no idea how data is stored. Adding backing fields and extra [NotMapped] properties is actually coupling your domain model to your infrastructure.

Remember - your domain is king, and not the database. The database is just being used to store parts of your domain.

Instead you can use EF Core's HasConversion() method on the EntityTypeBuilder object to convert between your type and JSON.

Given these 2 domain models:

public class Person
{
    public int Id { get; set; }

    [Required]
    [MaxLength(50)]
    public string FirstName { get; set; }

    [Required]
    [MaxLength(50)]
    public string LastName { get; set; }

    [Required]
    public DateTime DateOfBirth { get; set; }

    public IList<Address> Addresses { get; set; }      
}

public class Address
{
    public string Type { get; set; }
    public string Company { get; set; }
    public string Number { get; set; }
    public string Street { get; set; }
    public string City { get; set; }
}

I have only added attributes that the domain is interested in - and not details that the DB would be interested in; I.E there is no [Key].

My DbContext has the following IEntityTypeConfiguration for the Person:

public class PersonsConfiguration : IEntityTypeConfiguration<Person>
{
    public void Configure(EntityTypeBuilder<Person> builder)
    {
        // This Converter will perform the conversion to and from Json to the desired type
        builder.Property(e => e.Addresses).HasConversion(
            v => JsonConvert.SerializeObject(v, new JsonSerializerSettings { NullValueHandling = NullValueHandling.Ignore }),
            v => JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<IList<Address>>(v, new JsonSerializerSettings { NullValueHandling = NullValueHandling.Ignore }));
    }
}

With this method you can completely decouple your domain from your infrastructure. No need for all the backing field & extra properties.

13
  • 55
    Be careful with this approach: EF Core marks an entity as modified only if the field is assigned to. So if you use person.Addresses.Add, the entity won't be flagged as updated; you'll need to call the property setter person.Addresses = updatedAddresses. – Métoule Dec 5 '18 at 13:43
  • 1
    @DarrenWainwright I agree the model should know nothing about how its stored, but unfortunately, we're stuck using [NotMapped] if we go the IEntityTypeConfiguration route still because no equivalent exists. Unless I'm just not seeing it anywhere using the EntityTypeBuilder. – Kilhoffer May 28 '19 at 21:21
  • 7
    This method worked for me, but you need to apply this configuration as well! modelBuilder.ApplyConfiguration(new PersonsConfiguration()); – CodeThief Feb 21 '20 at 13:49
  • 1
    @Métoule - My Solution Fixes this issue you need a ValueComparer. See my answer below. – Robert Raboud May 13 '20 at 12:42
  • 4
    Trying this on ef core 3.1, getting the following error. Any idea on how to fix ? "The entity type 'Address' requires a primary key to be defined. If you intended to use a keyless entity type call 'HasNoKey()'." – Nairooz NIlafdeen Jul 8 '20 at 14:56
38

The key to making the the Change Tracker function correctly is to implement a ValueComparer as well as a ValueConverter. Below is an extension to implement such:

public static class ValueConversionExtensions
{
    public static PropertyBuilder<T> HasJsonConversion<T>(this PropertyBuilder<T> propertyBuilder) where T : class, new()
    {
        ValueConverter<T, string> converter = new ValueConverter<T, string>
        (
            v => JsonConvert.SerializeObject(v),
            v => JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<T>(v) ?? new T()
        );

        ValueComparer<T> comparer = new ValueComparer<T>
        (
            (l, r) => JsonConvert.SerializeObject(l) == JsonConvert.SerializeObject(r),
            v => v == null ? 0 : JsonConvert.SerializeObject(v).GetHashCode(),
            v => JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<T>(JsonConvert.SerializeObject(v))
        );

        propertyBuilder.HasConversion(converter);
        propertyBuilder.Metadata.SetValueConverter(converter);
        propertyBuilder.Metadata.SetValueComparer(comparer);
        propertyBuilder.HasColumnType("jsonb");

        return propertyBuilder;
    }
}

Example of how this works.

public class Person
{
    public int Id { get; set; }

    [Required]
    [MaxLength(50)]
    public string FirstName { get; set; }

    [Required]
    [MaxLength(50)]
    public string LastName { get; set; }

    [Required]
    public DateTime DateOfBirth { get; set; }

    public List<Address> Addresses { get; set; }      
}

public class Address
{
    public string Type { get; set; }
    public string Company { get; set; }
    public string Number { get; set; }
    public string Street { get; set; }
    public string City { get; set; }
}

public class PersonsConfiguration : IEntityTypeConfiguration<Person>
{
    public void Configure(EntityTypeBuilder<Person> builder)
    {
        // This Converter will perform the conversion to and from Json to the desired type
        builder.Property(e => e.Addresses).HasJsonConversion<IList<Address>>();
    }
}

This will make the ChangeTracker function correctly.

5
  • Nice solution! Tried it and it works. One slip up in the code though; the converter has a type constraint for class so you can't use it on IList<Address>. It needs to be a concrete type like IList<Address>. An important thing to remember here is that you can only query on the JSON data using hand written SQL, resulting in rather complex SQL with CTEs and such. – Marnix van Valen Dec 11 '19 at 10:26
  • 2
    Nice catch, I fixed the code. This is actually part of new article I am writing and new nuget package to handle this. I am working on a generic solution for adding metadata without the need to continually modify the entity. I use a Dictionary<string, object> to store the metadata via name value pairs. And yes this solution does not lend itself to easily query the metadata. – Robert Raboud Dec 12 '19 at 13:44
  • 1
    @RobertRaboud: Any news on that article or the nuget package? Would appreciate it very much – Max R. Jun 17 '20 at 9:07
  • @RobertRaboud the solution is super! Article would be wonderful to have as a resource for all – but I'm not sold and don't think the general JSON blob is a good way to go. You still want to keep the fields small, and remember while EF Core doesn't yet have JSON mappings, SQL Server itself DOES (and you could write your own) – so future-proofing is better to have more light-weight JSON fields not one big <string, object> dictionary. Of course there is an exception for this, but probably more for the 5-10% of scenarios rather than the +90% – Marchy Jun 22 '20 at 14:46
  • 6
    For SQL Server, i had to change jsonb to nvarchar(max). As recommended by microsoft – Learner Aug 6 '20 at 7:32
35

@Michael's answer got me on track but I implemented it a little differently. I ended up storing the value as a string in a private property and using it as a "Backing Field". The ExtendedData property then converted JObject to a string on set and vice versa on get:

public class Campaign
{
    // https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/ef/core/modeling/backing-field
    private string _extendedData;

    [Key]
    public Guid Id { get; set; }

    [Required]
    [MaxLength(50)]
    public string Name { get; set; }

    [NotMapped]
    public JObject ExtendedData
    {
        get
        {
            return JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<JObject>(string.IsNullOrEmpty(_extendedData) ? "{}" : _extendedData);
        }
        set
        {
            _extendedData = value.ToString();
        }
    }
}

To set _extendedData as a backing field, I added this to my context:

protected override void OnModelCreating(ModelBuilder modelBuilder)
{
    modelBuilder.Entity<Campaign>()
        .Property<string>("ExtendedDataStr")
        .HasField("_extendedData");
}

Update: Darren's answer to use EF Core Value Conversions (new to EF Core 2.1 - which didn't exist at the time of this answer) seems to be the best way to go at this point.

4
  • that could also be an option. Both of these approaches are in EF core documentation. Backing field looks cleaner but can be not so easy to understand later :) – Michael Jun 29 '17 at 19:46
  • 2
    Both of them are right approach. The only difference is, since EF core supports shadow properties, backing field approach would utilize a shadow property and avoid having extra property in your domain model. :) – Smit Jun 30 '17 at 19:59
  • How to use this with jquery? – Kavin404 Nov 29 '19 at 10:21
  • 4
    @Kavin404 - you do not use this with JQuery. EF Core is a .NET data access technology and JQuery is a front-end (browser) javascript framework. – Alex Dec 6 '19 at 23:57
9

For those using EF 2.1 there is a nice little NuGet package EfCoreJsonValueConverter that makes it pretty simple.

using Innofactor.EfCoreJsonValueConverter;
using Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore;
using Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore.Metadata.Builders;

public class Campaign
{
    [Key]
    public Guid Id { get; set; }

    [Required]
    [MaxLength(50)]
    public string Name { get; set; }

    public JObject ExtendedData { get; set; }
}

public class CampaignConfiguration : IEntityTypeConfiguration<Campaign> 
{
    public void Configure(EntityTypeBuilder<Campaign> builder) 
    {
        builder
            .Property(application => application.ExtendedData)
            .HasJsonValueConversion();
    }
}
1
5

Could you try something like this?

    [NotMapped]
    private JObject extraData;

    [NotMapped]
    public JObject ExtraData
    {
        get { return extraData; }
        set { extraData = value; }
    }

    [Column("ExtraData")]
    public string ExtraDataStr
    {
        get
        {
            return this.extraData.ToString();
        }
        set
        {
            this.extraData = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<JObject>(value);
        }
    }

here is the migration output:

ExtraData = table.Column<string>(nullable: true),
3
2

// DbContext

  protected override void OnModelCreating(ModelBuilder modelBuilder)
        {
            var entityTypes = modelBuilder.Model.GetEntityTypes();
            foreach (var entityType in entityTypes)
            {
                foreach (var property in entityType.ClrType.GetProperties().Where(x => x != null && x.GetCustomAttribute<HasJsonConversionAttribute>() != null))
                {
                    modelBuilder.Entity(entityType.ClrType)
                        .Property(property.PropertyType, property.Name)
                        .HasJsonConversion();
                }
            }

            base.OnModelCreating(modelBuilder);
        }


Create an attribute to handle the properties of the entities.


public class HasJsonConversionAttribute : System.Attribute
    {

    }

Create extention class to find Josn properties

    public static class ValueConversionExtensions
    {
        public static PropertyBuilder HasJsonConversion(this PropertyBuilder propertyBuilder)
        {
            ParameterExpression parameter1 = Expression.Parameter(propertyBuilder.Metadata.ClrType, "v");

            MethodInfo methodInfo1 = typeof(Newtonsoft.Json.JsonConvert).GetMethod("SerializeObject", types: new Type[] { typeof(object) });
            MethodCallExpression expression1 = Expression.Call(methodInfo1 ?? throw new Exception("Method not found"), parameter1);

            ParameterExpression parameter2 = Expression.Parameter(typeof(string), "v");
            MethodInfo methodInfo2 = typeof(Newtonsoft.Json.JsonConvert).GetMethod("DeserializeObject", 1, BindingFlags.Static | BindingFlags.Public, Type.DefaultBinder, CallingConventions.Any, types: new Type[] { typeof(string) }, null)?.MakeGenericMethod(propertyBuilder.Metadata.ClrType) ?? throw new Exception("Method not found");
            MethodCallExpression expression2 = Expression.Call(methodInfo2, parameter2);

            var converter = Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(ValueConverter<,>).MakeGenericType(typeof(List<AttributeValue>), typeof(string)), new object[]
                {
                    Expression.Lambda( expression1,parameter1),
                    Expression.Lambda( expression2,parameter2),
                    (ConverterMappingHints) null
                });

            propertyBuilder.HasConversion(converter as ValueConverter);

            return propertyBuilder;
        }
    }

Entity example

 public class Attribute
    {
        [Key, DatabaseGenerated(DatabaseGeneratedOption.Identity)]
        public int Id { get; set; }
        public string Name { get; set; }

        [HasJsonConversion]
        public List<AttributeValue> Values { get; set; }
    }

    public class AttributeValue
    {
        public string Value { get; set; }
        public IList<AttributeValueTranslation> Translations { get; set; }
    }

    public class AttributeValueTranslation
    {
        public string Translation { get; set; }

        public string CultureName { get; set; }
    }

Download Source

1
  • for some reason this is not working properly with EFCore 3. Checking the values of entityTypes it considers the Values in Attribute class as an entity with no key. – SolidSnake Jan 14 at 20:42
2

Here's something I used

Model

public class FacilityModel 
{
    public string Name { get; set; } 
    public JObject Values { get; set; } 
}

Entity

[Table("facility", Schema = "public")]
public class Facility 
{
     public string Name { get; set; } 
     public Dictionary<string, string> Values { get; set; } = new Dictionary<string, string>();
}

Mapping

this.CreateMap<Facility, FacilityModel>().ReverseMap();

DBContext

base.OnModelCreating(builder); 
        builder.Entity<Facility>()
        .Property(b => b.Values)
        .HasColumnType("jsonb")
        .HasConversion(
        v => JsonConvert.SerializeObject(v),
        v => JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<Dictionary<string, string>>(v));
1

For developers, who work with EF Core 3.1 and meet such error ("The entity type 'XXX' requires a primary key to be defined. If you intended to use a keyless entity type call 'HasNoKey()'.") the solution is just to move .HasConversion() method with it's lambda from: public class OrderConfiguration : IEntityTypeConfiguration to: protected override void OnModelCreating(ModelBuilder modelBuilder) //in YourModelContext : DbContext class.

1
0

The comment by @Métoule:

Be careful with this approach: EF Core marks an entity as modified only if the field is assigned to. So if you use person.Addresses.Add, the entity won't be flagged as updated; you'll need to call the property setter person.Addresses = updatedAddresses.

made me take a different approach so that this fact is obvious: use Getter and Setter methods, rather than a property.

public void SetExtendedData(JObject extendedData) {
    ExtendedData = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(extendedData);
    _deserializedExtendedData = extendedData;
}

//just to prevent deserializing more than once unnecessarily
private JObject _deserializedExtendedData;

public JObject GetExtendedData() {
    if (_extendedData != null) return _deserializedExtendedData;
    _deserializedExtendedData = string.IsNullOrEmpty(ExtendedData) ? null : JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<JObject>(ExtendedData);
    return _deserializedExtendedData;
}

You could theoretically do this:

campaign.GetExtendedData().Add(something);

But it's much more clear that That Doesn't Do What You Think It Does™.

If you're using database-first and using some kind of class auto-generator for EF, then the classes will usually be declared as partial, so you can add this stuff in a separate file that won't get blown away the next time you update your classes from your database.

0

I have made a solution based on Robert Raboud's contribution. The change made by me is that my implementation uses a HasJsonConversion method that depends on the System.Text.Json package rather than Newtonsofts library:

    public static PropertyBuilder<T> HasJsonConversion<T>(this PropertyBuilder<T> propertyBuilder) where T : class, new()
    {
        var options = new JsonSerializerOptions
        {
            PropertyNamingPolicy = JsonNamingPolicy.CamelCase,
            WriteIndented = true,
            AllowTrailingCommas = true,
            PropertyNameCaseInsensitive = true
        };

        ValueConverter<T, string> converter = new ValueConverter<T, string>
        (
            v => JsonSerializer.Serialize(v, options),
            v => JsonSerializer.Deserialize<T>(v, options) ?? new T()
        );

        ValueComparer<T> comparer = new ValueComparer<T>
        (
            (l, r) => JsonSerializer.Serialize(l, options) == JsonSerializer.Serialize(r, options),
            v => v == null ? 0 : JsonSerializer.Serialize(v, options).GetHashCode(),
            v => JsonSerializer.Deserialize<T>(JsonSerializer.Serialize(v, options), options)
        );

        propertyBuilder.HasConversion(converter);
        propertyBuilder.Metadata.SetValueConverter(converter);
        propertyBuilder.Metadata.SetValueComparer(comparer);
        propertyBuilder.HasColumnType("LONGTEXT");

        return propertyBuilder;
    }

Note also that this implementation expects for the column to be LONGTEXT since I am using a MySQL setup.

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