1
public class Node<E> : IPosition<E>
{
    private E element;
    public Node<E> PrevNode { get; set; }
    public Node<E> NextNode { get; set; }

    //Constructor
    public Node(E e, Node<E> p, Node<E> n)
    {
        element = e;
        PrevNode = p;
        NextNode = n;
    }
}

I have the above Node class which I want, when I create a new node object, to be able to do this:

Node<E> n = new Node<E>(null, null, null);

This does not work since all types cannot be null. What surprises me is when I try a similar thing in Java, it works. I have seen some relevant questions on Stack Overflow, but they do not give the result I want. I do not want to use the default(E).

  • C# allows for generics to be used with primitive types, while Java only allows reference types with generics. All reference types can be null, so it works in Java. – 4castle Jun 29 '17 at 18:03
  • 1
    Node n = new Node(null, null, null); you have to provide the specific type in order that to work. – dcg Jun 29 '17 at 18:03
  • 2
    I do not need the default(E) Don't you though? How is that not exactly what you want? – Servy Jun 29 '17 at 18:04
  • Or something like Node<int?> n = new Node<int?>(null, null, null); where the type is nullable. – Jay Buckman Jun 29 '17 at 18:07
  • @Derek Not if that code is in the definition of Node; inside the class definition there is a type named E. – Servy Jun 29 '17 at 18:12
9

You need a generic type constraint stating that E must be a reference type:

public class Node<E> : IPosition<E> where E : class

That is, unless you also need E to be a value type for other reasons. If that's the case, you need to sacrifice one requirement or the other.

Nullable value types are an option: With your original version, lacking the type constraint (because Nullable<T> is a value type itself), you could use int?. The following code compiles for me without the constraint:

var y = new Node<int?>(null, null, null);

int? isn't int, but it isn't exactly not int, is it?

2

What surprises me is when i try something similar in Java, it works.

This is because Java generic types are implemented with type erasure, which effectively means that they are all java.lang.Object descendants.

For example, you cannot use primitive int as your Node's type argument in Java: you are forced to use java.lang.Integer instead. Hence, element can be assigned null regardless of T.

In C# there is no such limitation on type parameter: writing Node<int> is perfectly legal. However, with element of type int you can no longer write element = null, which is the root cause of the error that you see.

In addition to the default(T) approach that you mention, you could require that T is a reference type, like this:

public class Node<E> : IPosition<E> where E : class {
    ...
}

Now it is legal to pass null to the initial parameter of Node's constructor, but it is illegal to instantiate Node<T> with any value type, including Nullable<Tx>.

1

What if we do like this:

First of all create one simple interface

public interface IOptional<T>: IEnumerable<T> {}

And write implementation of it

public class Maybe<T>: IOptional<T>
{
    private readonly IEnumerable<T> _element;
    public Maybe(T element)
        : this(new T[1] { element })
    {}
    public Maybe()
        : this(new T[0])
    {}
    private Maybe(T[] element)
    {
        _element = element;
    }
    public IEnumerator<T> GetEnumerator()
    {
        return _element.GetEnumerator();
    }
    IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return GetEnumerator();
    }
}

After this we do some changes in your Node class

public class Node<E> : IPosition<E>
{
    private IOptional<E> element;
    public Node<E> PrevNode { get; set; }
    public Node<E> NextNode { get; set; }

    //Constructor
    public Node(IOptional<E> e, Node<E> p, Node<E> n)
    {
        element = e;
        PrevNode = p;
        NextNode = n;
    }
}

And use it

Node<E> n = new Node<E>(
                new Maybe<E>(), 
                null, 
                null
             );

No more null checks inside Node class on this field

Instead of this

if (this.element != null) { .. }

Write like this

this.element.Select(e => { doSomething(e); return true; })

like this

if (this.element.Any()) 
{ 
    var elem = this.element.First();
    // do something
}

or write one small extension method

public static IOptional<TOutput> Match<TInput, TOutput>(
    this IEnumerable<TInput> maybe,
    Func<TInput, TOutput> some, Func<TOutput> nothing)
{
    if (maybe.Any())
    {
        return new Maybe<TOutput>(
                    some(
                        maybe.First()
                    )
                );
    }
    else
    {
        return new Maybe<TOutput>(
                    nothing()
                );
    }
}

and do like this

var result = this.element
                 .Match(
                     some: e => e.ToString(),
                     nothing: () => "Ups"
                 )
                 .First();
  • look my answer about null object pattern – kogoia Jun 29 '17 at 18:41
  • I also recommend remove all null's in your code, especially as parametres in constructor or methods – kogoia Jun 29 '17 at 18:44

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.