15

Assume the following situation:

Type A and type B, B can be implicitly converted to A but the opposite is untrue.

I have a function

template<class T>
void do_stuff(T a, T b);

I want to call said function as such:

do_stuff(A{}, B{});

The problem here is that the compiler can't deduce the type and instead says:

template argument deduction/substitution failed

I can call my function like this:

do_stuff<A>(A{}, B{});

But this is more annoying for the user.

Alternatively I can do something like this:

template<class T, class M>
void do_stuff(T a, M b);

But then b goes on its merry way to be of type B (with the prior invocation).

Ideally I would like something like:

template<class T, class M = T>
void do_stuff(T a, M b);

Or:

template<class T@INSERT MAGIC SO THAT T IS DEDUCED AS BEING THE TYPE OF ARGUMENT NR 1@>
void do_stuff(T a, T b);

Is such a thing possible ?

21

Wrap b in a non-deduced context. That way, only a will be deduced and b must be converted to that type.

template <class T> struct dont_deduce { using type = T; };
template <class T> using dont_deduce_t = typename dont_deduce<T>::type;

template<class T>
void do_stuff(T a, dont_deduce_t<T> b);
  • 12
    decltype(a) b works too. – T.C. Jun 29 '17 at 20:55
  • 3
    @George See What is a nondeduced context?. We're just preventing b from being deduced, it's just treated as an argument whose type is T. – Barry Jun 29 '17 at 21:34
  • 3
    Well... I cannot I won't, but, isn't decltype(a) a much much simpler way of doing this ? As in, it doesn't require understanding of deducible vs non-deducible context nor so much code. I mean I'm not saying the answer is wrong, only that the other one is equal valid and would be worth displaying side by side – George Jun 29 '17 at 21:53
  • 1
    @George I prefer being more explicit, I don't like using decltype() like this. It works just as well - it too creates a non-deduced context - so if you like it, by all means. – Barry Jun 29 '17 at 22:04
  • 4
    @George Yes, I'm sure - for the 3rd time, decltype(a) is just as much a non-deduced context as dont_deduce_t<T>, which is why I keep saying that they work the same way. You're forcing the type of a to be deduced and then just using that as the type of b. – Barry Jun 29 '17 at 23:01
8

There is answer in C++11: std::common_type http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/types/common_type

template<typename A>
void f_impl(A a, A b)
{

}

template<typename A, typename B>
void f(A a, B b)
{
    f_impl<typename std::common_type<A, B>::type>(a, b);
}


struct Z
{

};
struct W
{
    operator Z();
};

int main()
{
    f(1u, 1l); //work
    f(W{}, Z{});
    f(Z{}, W{}); //and this work too
}

https://godbolt.org/g/ieuHTS

  • Its a nice option, but still works through delegation not directly. But I can see it being useful in many other cases. – George Jun 30 '17 at 7:31
7

It's certainly possible, just with a little delegation. You've made the problem pretty easy by specifying that you always want the inferred type to be the type of the first argument, so all we need to do is drop a little hint to the compiler.

template <class T>
void do_stuff_impl(T a, T b) {
    cout << "Doing some work..." << endl;
}

template <class T, class S>
void do_stuff(T a, S b) {
    do_stuff_impl<T>(a, b);
}

Now the user can call do_stuff with any two arguments, and C++ will try to implicitly cast the second argument to match the type of the first. If the cast isn't valid, you'll get a template instantiation error. On GCC, it says cannot convert ‘b’ (type ‘A’) to type ‘B’, which is pretty accurate and to the point. And any compiler worth its salt is going to be able to inline that delegated call, so there should be negligible overhead.

  • Whilst this accomplishes what I want I feel like its not exactly appropriate, since it still allows for calling the function with a different type for a and b (Which I don't want to allows if possible) – George Jun 29 '17 at 21:09
  • do_stuff_impl<std::common_type_t<T>>(a, b); might be more appropriate. – Jarod42 Jun 29 '17 at 22:38
1

another way, seeking to express intent declaratively:

#include <type_traits>

// a B
struct B{};

// an A can be constructed from a B    
struct A{
    A() {};
    A(B) {};
};

// prove that A is constructible from B
static_assert(std::is_convertible<B, A>::value, "");

// enable this function only if a U is convertible to a T
template<
  // introduce the actors
  class T, class U,

  // declare intent    
  std::enable_if_t<std::is_convertible<U, T>::value>* = nullptr
>
void do_stuff(T, U)
{

}

int main()
{
    // legal
    do_stuff(A{}, B{});

    // does not compile
//    do_stuff(B{}, A{});

}

update:

to force the conversion, a lambda can be used:

// enable this function only if a U is convertible to a T
template<class T, class U,
std::enable_if_t<std::is_convertible<U, T>::value>* = nullptr
>
void do_stuff(T a, U b)
{
    return[](T& a, T b) -> decltype(auto)
    {

    }(a, b);
}
  • I'm sorry, but this does not solve my problem, maybe I was not good enough at expressing my intent here :/... in this example the type of U becomes B. The check do indeed assure me that the class CAN be converted to A, but I want it to be converted, not just the assurance that it can. Imagine that I had a method "do_more_stuff()" on A, if I took the second parameter (in this case of type U which becomes B) and called that method inside "do_stuff" it would generate a compilation error... so this is not good :/ – George Jun 29 '17 at 21:41
  • @George updated. added an inner lambda to actually perform the conversion. – Richard Hodges Jun 30 '17 at 9:02

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