28

I'm using StructureMap to resolve references to my repository class. My repository interface implements IDisposable, e.g.

public interface IMyRepository : IDisposable
{
  SomeClass GetById(int id);
}

An implementation of the interface using Entity Framework:

public MyRepository : IMyRepository
{
    private MyDbContext _dbContext;

    public MyDbContext()
    {
        _dbContext = new MyDbContext();
    }

    public SomeClass GetById(int id)
    {
        var query = from x in _dbContext
                    where x.Id = id
                    select x;
        return x.FirstOrDefault();
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        _dbContext.Dispose();
    }
}

Anyway as mentioned I'm using StructureMap to resolve IMyRepository. So when, where and how should I call my dispose method?

2
  • I would think that if your IMyRepository implimented IDisposable then the Entity Framework would take care of executing your dispose method. I don't know this for sure but it seems the logical conclusion. – Jamie Dixon Dec 19 '10 at 15:44
  • Opps missed that. The Interface does indeed inherit from IDisposable...So in the implementation of the interface you're required to implement the dispose method – Fixer Dec 19 '10 at 15:53
22

Warning: please note that my views have changed, and you should consider the followimg advise outdated. Please read the update at the end.


While DI frameworks can manage lifetime of objects for you and some could even dispose objects for you after you're done using with them, it makes object disposal just too implicit. The IDisposable interface is created because there was the need of deterministic clean-up of resources. Therefore, in the context of DI, I personally like to make this clean-up very explicit. When you make it explicit, you've got basically two options: 1. Configure the DI to return transient objects and dispose these objects yourself. 2. Configure a factory and instruct the factory to create new instances.

I favor the second approach over the first, because especially when doing Dependency Injection, your code isn't as clean as it could be. Look for instance at this code:

public sealed class Client : IDisposable
{
    private readonly IDependency dependency;

    public Client(IDependency dependency)
    {
        this. dependency = dependency;
    }

    public void Do()
    {
        this.dependency.DoSomething();
    }

    public Dispose()
    {
        this.dependency.Dispose();
    }
}

While this code explicitly disposes the dependency, it could raise some eyebrows to readers, because resources should normally only be disposed by the owner of the resource. Apparently, the Client became the owner of the resource, when it was injected.

Because of this, I favor the use of a factory. Look for instance at this example:

public sealed class Client
{
    private readonly IDependencyFactory factory;

    public Client(IDependencyFactory factory)
    {
        this.factory = factory;
    }

    public void Do()
    {
        using (var dependency = this.factory.CreateNew())
        {
            dependency.DoSomething();
        }
    }
}

This example has the exact same behavior as the previous example, but see how the Client class doesn't have to implement IDisposable anymore, because it creates and disposes the resource within the Do method.

Injecting a factory is the most explicit way (the path of least surprise) to do this. That's why I prefer this style. Downside of this is that you often need to define more classes (for your factories), but I personally don't mind.


RPM1984 asked for a more concrete example.

I would not have the repository implement IDisposable, but have a Unit of Work that implements IDisposable, controls/contains repositories and have a factory that knows how to create new unit of works. With that in mind, the above code would look like this:

public sealed class Client
{
    private readonly INorthwindUnitOfWorkFactory factory;

    public Client(INorthwindUnitOfWorkFactory factory)
    {
        this.factory = factory;
    }

    public void Do()
    {
        using (NorthwindUnitOfWork db = 
            this.factory.CreateNew())
        {
            // 'Customers' is a repository.
            var customer = db.Customers.GetById(1);

            customer.Name = ".NET Junkie";

            db.SubmitChanges();
        }
    }
}

In the design I use, and have described here, I use a concrete NorthwindUnitOfWork class that wraps an IDataMapper that is the gateway to the underlying LINQ provider (such as LINQ to SQL or Entity Framework). In sumary, the design is as follows:

  1. An INorthwindUnitOfWorkFactory is injected in a client.
  2. The particular implementation of that factory creates a concrete NorthwindUnitOfWork class and injects a O/RM specific IDataMapper class into it.
  3. The NorthwindUnitOfWork is in fact a type-safe wrapper around the IDataMapper and the NorthwindUnitOfWork requests the IDataMapper for repositories and forwards requests to submit changes and dispose to the mapper.
  4. The IDataMapper returns Repository<T> classes and a repository implements IQueryable<T> to allow the client to use LINQ over the repository.
  5. The specific implementation of the IDataMapper holds a reference to the O/RM specific unit of work (for instance EF's ObjectContext). For that reason the IDataMapper must implement IDisposable.

This results in the following design:

public interface INorthwindUnitOfWorkFactory
{
    NorthwindUnitOfWork CreateNew();
}

public interface IDataMapper : IDisposable
{
    Repository<T> GetRepository<T>() where T : class;

    void Save();
}

public abstract class Repository<T> : IQueryable<T>
    where T : class
{
    private readonly IQueryable<T> query;

    protected Repository(IQueryable<T> query)
    {
        this.query = query;
    }

    public abstract void InsertOnSubmit(T entity);

    public abstract void DeleteOnSubmit(T entity);

    // IQueryable<T> members omitted.
}

The NorthwindUnitOfWork is a concrete class that contains properties to specific repositories, such as Customers, Orders, etc:

public sealed class NorthwindUnitOfWork : IDisposable 
{
    private readonly IDataMapper mapper;

    public NorthwindUnitOfWork(IDataMapper mapper)
    {
        this.mapper = mapper;
    }

    // Repository properties here:    
    public Repository<Customer> Customers
    {
        get { return this.mapper.GetRepository<Customer>(); }
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        this.mapper.Dispose();
    }
}

What's left is an concrete implementation of the INorthwindUnitOfWorkFactory and a concrete implementation of the IDataMapper. Here's one for Entity Framework:

public class EntityFrameworkNorthwindUnitOfWorkFactory
    : INorthwindUnitOfWorkFactory
{
    public NorthwindUnitOfWork CreateNew()
    {
        var db = new ObjectContext("name=NorthwindEntities");
        db.DefaultContainerName = "NorthwindEntities";
        var mapper = new EntityFrameworkDataMapper(db);
        return new NorthwindUnitOfWork(mapper);
    }
}

And the EntityFrameworkDataMapper:

public sealed class EntityFrameworkDataMapper : IDataMapper
{
    private readonly ObjectContext context;

    public EntityFrameworkDataMapper(ObjectContext context)
    {
        this.context = context;
    }

    public void Save()
    {
        this.context.SaveChanges();
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        this.context.Dispose();
    }

    public Repository<T> GetRepository<T>() where T : class
    {
        string setName = this.GetEntitySetName<T>();

        var query = this.context.CreateQuery<T>(setName);
        return new EntityRepository<T>(query, setName);
    }

    private string GetEntitySetName<T>()
    {
        EntityContainer container =
            this.context.MetadataWorkspace.GetEntityContainer(
            this.context.DefaultContainerName, DataSpace.CSpace);

        return (
            from item in container.BaseEntitySets
            where item.ElementType.Name == typeof(T).Name
            select item.Name).First();
    }

    private sealed class EntityRepository<T>
        : Repository<T> where T : class
    {
        private readonly ObjectQuery<T> query;
        private readonly string entitySetName;

        public EntityRepository(ObjectQuery<T> query,
            string entitySetName) : base(query)
        {
            this.query = query;
            this.entitySetName = entitySetName;
        }

        public override void InsertOnSubmit(T entity)
        {
            this.query.Context.AddObject(entitySetName, entity);
        }

        public override void DeleteOnSubmit(T entity)
        {
            this.query.Context.DeleteObject(entity);
        }
    }
}

You can find more information about this model here.

UPDATE December 2012

This an an update written two years after my original answer. The last two years much has changed in the way I try to design the systems I'm working on. Although it has suited me in the past, I don't like to use the factory approach anymore when dealing with the Unit of Work pattern. Instead I simply inject a Unit of Work instance into consumers directly. Whether this design is feasibly for you however, depends a lot on the way your system is designed. If you want to read more about this, please take a look at this newer Stackoverflow answer of mine: One DbContext per web request…why?

2
  • Interesting. How would you create the context though? Would that be in the factory too, would love to see how this actually translates to a repository/datacontext architecture. – RPM1984 Dec 19 '10 at 21:13
  • Very interesting and insightful - +1. Similar to what i've done - however i don't use a factory, i pass the IUnitOfWork through the ctor and StructureMap will automatically instantiate the EFUnitOfWork (at start of HTTP request - i don't use using). Plus my UoW doesn't work directly with the repos like yours does - it works only wit the ObjectContext. The current entity set is exposed via generics/pluralization - which the repositories use to perform LINQ queries upon. Still - very similar to yours, and identical end result. Nice. – RPM1984 Dec 20 '10 at 10:05
11

If you want to get it right, i'd advise on a couple of changes:

1 - Don't have private instances of the data context in the repository. If your working with multiple repositories then you'll end up with multiple contexts.

2 - To solve the above - wrap the context in a Unit of Work. Pass the unit of work to the Repositories via the ctor: public MyRepository(IUnitOfWork uow)

3 - Make the Unit of Work implement IDisposable. The Unit of Work should be "newed up" when a request begins, and therefore should be disposed when the request finishes. The Repository should not implement IDisposable, as it is not directly working with resources - it is simply mitigating them. The DataContext / Unit of Work should implement IDispoable.

4 - Assuming you are using a web application, you do not need to explicitly call dispose - i repeat, you do not need to explicitly call your dispose method. StructureMap has a method called HttpContextBuildPolicy.DisposeAndClearAll();. What this does is invoke the "Dispose" method on any HTTP-scoped objects that implement IDisposable. Stick this call in Application_EndRequest (Global.asax). Also - i believe there is an updated method, called ReleaseAllHttpScopedObjects or something - can't remember the name.

2
  • 1
    +1 for using a Unit of Work. btw, here's a nice article about unit of work with EF and DI: bit.ly/bF7jL3. – Steven Dec 19 '10 at 21:12
  • @Steven - thanks. BTW that link is timing out. :) I've already got my app setup with StructureMap/EF, but i'd be interested to see in your below answer what the code using (var dependency = this.factory.CreateNew()) is using. Which dependency is that - the UoW/The Data Context/The Repository? From what i understand when dealing with EF (for example), only 1 resource should implement IDisposable, hence im intrigued by why you need a factory where all objects in factory implement IDisposable. – RPM1984 Dec 19 '10 at 22:24
0

Instead of adding Dispose to IMyRepository, you could declare IMyRepository like this:

public interface IMyRepository: IDisposable
{
  SomeClass GetById(int id);
} 

This way, you ensure all repository will call Dispose sometimes, and you can use the C# "using" pattern on a Repository object:

using (IMyRepository rep = GetMyRepository(...))
{
   ... do some work with rep
}
3
  • In normal circumstances StructureMap will resolve the creating new instances of the repository...so there won't be any code that will utilize the using block. – Fixer Dec 19 '10 at 15:51
  • Why add the Dispose() method to IMyRepository then? – Simon Mourier Dec 19 '10 at 15:53
  • sorry..edited my original question...IMyRepository does indeed inherit IDisposable. Still, StructureMap will be resolving the references so how should the DI engine call the dispose method? – Fixer Dec 19 '10 at 15:55

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