I have the following code and in the login feature, the output is erroneous (a logic error). It basically prints "invalid username and password" until it gets to the right one, and then prints "correct login".

ERRONEOUS OUTPUT:

For example, with the test data: user3 and pass3, the output is:

*****LOGIN SCREEN******
Username: user3
Password: pass3
invalid username or password
invalid username or password
correct login
>>> 

Here is the code in question, with reference to the LOGIN function:

usernames=["user1","user2","user3"]
passwords=["pass1","pass2","pass3"]

def main():
   mainmenu()


def mainmenu():
   print("****MAIN MENU****")
   print("=======Press L to login :")
   print("=======Press R to register :")
   choice1=input()
   if choice1=="L" or choice1=="l":
      login()
   elif choice1=="R" or choice1=="r":
      register()
   else:
      print("please make a valid selection")

usernames=["user1","user2","user3"]
passwords=["pass1","pass2","pass3"]

def login():
  print("*****LOGIN SCREEN******")
  username=input("Username: ")
  password=input("Password: ")
  for index_of_current_user, current_user in enumerate(usernames): #enumerate allows to you to go throw the list and gives to you the current element, and the index of the current element
    if username == current_user and passwords[index_of_current_user] == password: #since the two list are linked, you can use the index of the user to get the password in the passwords list
      print("correct login")
    else:
      print("invalid username or password")

def register():
  print("*****REGISTRATION****")
  username=input("Enter a username:")
  password=input("Enter a password:")
  users_pass[username] = password
  answer=input("Do you want to make another registration?")
  if answer=="y":
    register()
  else:
    registration_details()

def registration_details():
   print(usernames)
   print(passwords)

main()

I am looking for a) a solution and fix to the problem so that it only prints "correct login" once on finding the correct pair of usernames and passwords instead of looping through and printing each one

b) an explanation as to why the indentation or whatever it is that is wrong here doesn't work - as the logic (in a language like VB.Net) is sound.

I'd prefer it if the problem could be fixed without additional code (and a very simple fix) but perhaps the most elegant solution is a flag. That is, if the problem isn't just with indentation or something like that I've missed.

  • 1
    You execute else: print("invalid..") for every failing test, so yes, you get that output. – Martijn Pieters Jun 30 '17 at 20:20
  • are you able to suggest a fix? Please note that even though someone has very kindly downvoted me, this is a valid question in that I am coming it from a VB.Net background in which this logic/code structure would be sound – MissComputing Jun 30 '17 at 20:21
  • Just a suggestion, instead of using two lists to store usernames and passwords, just use a dictionary instead. – Alex F Jun 30 '17 at 20:21
  • 1
    So no, the logic is not sound. For every username in enumerate(usernames) you fail, you immediately print that the login is invalid. You can't know if the login is invalid until after you tested all usernames and passwords. – Martijn Pieters Jun 30 '17 at 20:21
  • Alex F - I know I could use a dictionary, but for teaching purposes need only to use lists. Martjin - so you are saying that the only solution is to use a flag of some sort and it cannot be done otherwise? I'd very much appreciate a solution/answer with explanation – MissComputing Jun 30 '17 at 20:22
up vote 1 down vote accepted

In your login() function, you print for every element of the list, so you could print after the loop doing:

def login():
  print("*****LOGIN SCREEN******")
  username=input("Username: ")
  password=input("Password: ")
  correct_login = False
  for index_of_current_user, current_user in enumerate(usernames): #enumerate allows to you to go throw the list and gives to you the current element, and the index of the current element
    if username == current_user and passwords[index_of_current_user] == password: #since the two list are linked, you can use the index of the user to get the password in the passwords list
      correct_login = True
      break
  if(correct_login):
    print("correct login")
  else:
    print("invalid user name or password")

You can leverage exceptions to write login this way.

def login():
  print("*****LOGIN SCREEN******")
  username=input("Username: ")
  password=input("Password: ")
  try:
    index = usernames.index(username)
    if password == passwords[index]:
      print("correct login")
    else:
      print("invalid username or password")
  except:
    print("invalid username or password")
  • that's a interesting alternative! I have never thought about it – Damian Lattenero Jun 30 '17 at 20:45

You're seeing this happen because of the else statement in your login function. Basically what your code is currently doing in that function is looping through, checking to see if the username and password are equal to the current value (i.e. compare user1 == user2) if they do not equal then you automatically print the invalid user name.

Instead you should wait until you compare all of the values to print the invalid username or password message. Also - instead of continuing to loop through your values, you could add a break to stop the for loop once the valid value is found. Your login function would look something like this:

def login():
  print("*****LOGIN SCREEN******")
  username=input("Username: ")
  password=input("Password: ")
  found = False
  for index_of_current_user, current_user in enumerate(usernames): #enumerate allows to you to go throw the list and gives to you the current element, and the index of the current element
    if username == current_user and passwords[index_of_current_user] == password: #since the two list are linked, you can use the index of the user to get the password in the passwords list
      print("correct login")
      found = True
      break
  if found == False:
    print("invalid username or password")

That will give you only 1 instance of either correct login or invalid username or password.

  • That's solve the problem, i will upvote, but i only comment that there is no need to do found == False in an if, False is already a boolean, and is different from True, so, you just ask if(found) or, if(not found), even look better :), if you want, see my answer above and you will see – Damian Lattenero Jun 30 '17 at 20:42

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