-1

I have a list of dataframes:

count1<-(seq(1:10)) 
count2<-(seq(5:14))    
other<-c("a","b","c","d","e","f","g","h","i","j")
a<-seq(1,20,by=2)
b<-seq(1,30,by=3)
c<-seq(1,40,by=4)

df1<-data.frame(cbind(a,other,count1))
df2<-data.frame(cbind(b,other,count1))
df3<-data.frame(cbind(c,other,count2))

sept<-list(df1,df2,df3)

I want to create an additional variable in each dataframe with values conditional on the value of count1/count2. With lapply, ifelse works for two conditions:

sept2<-lapply(sept,function(x) {
     mx<-max(x[[3]]);
     d3<-(mx-2);
     ifelse (d3 < x[[3]], x[[4]] <-4, x[[4]] <-0);
 })

this2
[[1]]
 [1] 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 4

[[2]]
 [1] 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 4

[[3]]
 [1] 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 4

However, using the same basic structure with an if else series doesn't work.

this3<-lapply(this,function(x) {
    mx<-max(x[[3]]);
    d3<-(mx-2);
    d2<-(mx-4);
    d1<-(mx-6);
    if (d3<x[[3]] && x[[3]]<=mx) {
        x[[4]] <-4
    } else if (d2<x[[3]] && x[[3]]<=d3){
        x[[4]] <-3
        } else if (d1<x[[3]] && x[[3]]<=d2){
            x[[4]] <-2
        }else {
            x[[4]] <-1
        }
})

this3

[[1]]
[1] 1

[[2]]
[1] 1

[[3]]
[1] 1

I don't understand why R knows to apply the function to each observation of x[[3]] when using ifelse, but not when using an if else series. Why are these two situations different?

  • count2 <- (seq(5:15)) is too long. may be count2 <- (seq(5:14)) – Suren Jul 1 '17 at 3:19
  • Thanks, fixed that. – sippstress Jul 1 '17 at 12:45
0

I think, when you write a if(cond) {do1} else {do2}, only the first element in cond is evaluated. For example, if cond[1] == TRUE, then do_1 is executed, and do2 if it's FALSE. Remaining elements of cond are disregarded.

That's not the behaviour of ifelse, as you've noticed from the first example. In ifelse (cond, do1, do2), relevant parts in do1 and do2 will be done depending on which elements of cond are TRUE or FALSE.


Following code shoud do what you want

this <- sept 
this3 <-lapply(this, function(x) {
  mx <- max(x[[3]]);
  d3 <- mx-2
  d2 <- mx-4
  d1 <- mx-6
  x[[4]] <- rep(1, length(x[[3]]))
  x[[4]][d3<x[[3]] & x[[3]]<=mx] <- 4
  x[[4]][d2<x[[3]] & x[[3]]<=d3] <- 3
  x[[4]][d1<x[[3]] & x[[3]]<=d2] <- 2
  x[[4]]
})
  • But I have if (cond) {do1} else if (cond2) {do2} else {do3}. R can handle an if else series in other contexts, but not here. – sippstress Jul 1 '17 at 12:47
  • What happens with if (cond) {do1} else if (cond2) {do2} else {do3} is same as what happens with if (cond) {do1} else else {do2}. If cond is a vector only the first element cond, that is cond[1], is TRUE then do1 is done, and so on. – Suren Jul 1 '17 at 13:26
  • Behaviour of ifelse is different. In ifelse(cond, do_true, do_false), if cond[1] is TRUE do_true[1], so to speak, is executed, if cond[1] is FALSE do_false[1] is performed. Then looks at cond[2] and either do_true[2] or do_false[2] get done, and so on. – Suren Jul 1 '17 at 13:29
  • You can see the behaviour of if (cond) {} else {} by changing some of the values. For example [[2]]$count1[1] <- 10 see what happens... – Suren Jul 1 '17 at 13:33
  • Another way to say this is that in if (cond) {} else {}, the cond is assumed to be of length one. Even if not, only the first element cond[1] is used. In ifelse, cond can be a scaler or a vector. – Suren Jul 1 '17 at 13:37

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