I am trying to use itertools.permutations() to return all the permutations of the string and return only the ones which are members of a set of words.

import itertools

def permutations_in_dict(string, words): 
    '''
    Parameters
    ----------
    string : {str}
    words : {set}

    Returns
    -------
    list : {list} of {str}    

    Example
    -------
    >>> permutations_in_dict('act', {'cat', 'rat', 'dog', 'act'})
    ['act', 'cat']
    '''

My current solution works fine in terminal but somehow couldn't pass the test case...

return list(set([''.join(p) for p in itertools.permutations(string)]) & words)

Any help will be appreciated.

  • 1
    What exactly is the test case? If you are comparing the results to ['act', 'cat'] perhaps you need to ignore the ordering and create a set. – Jacques Kvam Jul 1 '17 at 6:25
  • Indeed my output is ['cat','act'] which does not match with ['act','cat']. The ordering of set is random, right? Then how can I ignore/match with it? @JacquesKvam – Meruemu Jul 1 '17 at 6:32
  • 1
    How does it fail? Time could be a problem, creating all permutations of string explodes quite rapidly with the length of the string. Or if order matters then you may need to sorted(...) the result. – AChampion Jul 1 '17 at 6:46
  • 3
    I just posted a comparative analysis of the various approaches. It turns out that for small len(string), @Meruemu had the fastest approach by using set-intersection to search permutations of the target string. For a little bit larger sizes of len(string), the sort-and-compare approach is best. The Counter/multiset solution is second-best in all normal cases due to the overhead of hashing. However, the Counter/multiset approach would eventually beat sort-and-compare if all the inputs strings were very large. – Raymond Hettinger Jul 1 '17 at 7:56
  • Sorting the results is one way to satisfy the testcase. However if it's required it should say so in the description. On the otherhand, if the order of the results arbitrary you can alter the testcase to apply set to the result. Either way you should seek clarification from your client – John La Rooy Jul 7 '17 at 21:27
up vote 12 down vote accepted

You can simply use collections.Counter() to compare the words to the string without creating all permutations (this explodes with length of string):

from collections import Counter

def permutations_in_dict(string, words):
    c = Counter(string)
    return [w for w in words if c == Counter(w)]

>>> permutations_in_dict('act', {'cat', 'rat', 'dog', 'act'})
['cat', 'act']

Note: sets are unordered so if you need a specific order you may need to sort the result, e.g. return sorted(...)

Problem Category

The problem you're solving is best described as testing for anagram matches.

Solution using Sort

The traditional solution is to sort the target string, sort the candidate string, and test for equality.

>>> def permutations_in_dict(string, words):
        target = sorted(string)
        return sorted(word for word in words if sorted(word) == target)

>>> permutations_in_dict('act', {'cat', 'rat', 'dog', 'act'})
['act', 'cat']

Solution using Multisets

Another approach is to use collections.Counter() to make a multiset equality test. This is algorithmically superior to the sort solution (O(n) versus O(n log n)) but tends to lose unless the size of the strings is large (due to the cost of hashing all the characters).

>>> def permutations_in_dict(string, words):
        target = Counter(string)
        return sorted(word for word in words if Counter(word) == target)

>>> permutations_in_dict('act', {'cat', 'rat', 'dog', 'act'})
['act', 'cat']

Solution using a Perfect Hash

A unique anagram signature or perfect hash can be constructed by multiplying prime numbers corresponding to each possible character in a string.

The commutative property of multiplication guarantees that the hash value will be invariant for any permutation of a single string. The uniqueness of the hash value is guaranteed by the fundamental theorem of arithmetic (also known as the unique prime factorization theorem).

>>> from operator import mul
>>> primes = [2, 3, 5, 7, 11]
>>> primes += [p for p in range(13, 1620) if all(pow(b, p-1, p) == 1 for b in (5, 11))]
>>> anagram_hash = lambda s: reduce(mul, (primes[ord(c)] for c in s))
>>> def permutations_in_dict(string, words):
        target = anagram_hash(string)
        return sorted(word for word in words if anagram_hash(word) == target)

>>> permutations_in_dict('act', {'cat', 'rat', 'dog', 'act'})
['act', 'cat']

Solution using Permutations

Searching by permutations on the target string using itertools.permutations() is reasonable when the string is small (generating permutations on a n length string generates n factorial candidates).

The good news is that when n is small and the number of words is large, this approach runs very fast (because set membership testing is O(1)):

>>> from itertools import permutations
>>> def permutations_in_dict(string, words):
        perms = set(map(''.join, permutations(string)))
        return sorted(word for word in words if word in perms)

>>> permutations_in_dict('act', {'cat', 'rat', 'dog', 'act'})
['act', 'cat']

As the OP surmised, the pure python search loop can be sped-up to c-speed by using set.intersection():

>>> def permutations_in_dict(string, words):
        perms = set(map(''.join, permutations(string)))
        return sorted(words & perms)

>>> permutations_in_dict('act', {'cat', 'rat', 'dog', 'act'})
['act', 'cat']

Best Solution

Which solution is best depends on the length of string and the length of words. Timings will show which is best for a particular problem.

Here are some comparative timings for the various approaches using two different string sizes:

Timings with string_size=5 and words_size=1000000
-------------------------------------------------
0.01406    match_sort
0.06827    match_multiset
0.02167    match_perfect_hash
0.00224    match_permutations
0.00013    match_permutations_set

Timings with string_size=20 and words_size=1000000
--------------------------------------------------
2.19771    match_sort
8.38644    match_multiset
4.22723    match_perfect_hash
<takes "forever"> match_permutations
<takes "forever"> match_permutations_set

The results indicate that for small strings, the fastest approach searches permutations on the target string using set-intersection.

For larger strings, the fastest approach is the traditional sort-and-compare solution.

Hope you found this little algorithmic study as interesting as I have. The take-aways are:

  • Sets, itertools, and collections make short work of problems like this.
  • Big-oh running times matter (n-factorial disintegrates for large n).
  • Constant overhead matters (sorting beats multisets because of hashing overhead).
  • Discrete mathematics is a treasure trove of ideas.
  • It is hard to know what is best until you do analysis and run timings :-)

Timing Set-up

FWIW, here is a test set-up I used to run the comparative timings:

from collections import Counter
from itertools import permutations
from string import letters
from random import choice
from operator import mul
from time import time

def match_sort(string, words):
    target = sorted(string)
    return sorted(word for word in words if sorted(word) == target)

def match_multiset(string, words):
    target = Counter(string)
    return sorted(word for word in words if Counter(word) == target)

primes = [2, 3, 5, 7, 11]
primes += [p for p in range(13, 1620) if all(pow(b, p-1, p) == 1 for b in (5, 11))]
anagram_hash = lambda s: reduce(mul, (primes[ord(c)] for c in s))

def match_perfect_hash(string, words):
    target = anagram_hash(string)
    return sorted(word for word in words if anagram_hash(word) == target)

def match_permutations(string, words):
    perms = set(map(''.join, permutations(string)))
    return sorted(word for word in words if word in perms)

def match_permutations_set(string, words):
    perms = set(map(''.join, permutations(string)))
    return sorted(words & perms)

string_size = 5
words_size = 1000000

population = letters[: string_size+2]
words = set()
for i in range(words_size):
    word = ''.join([choice(population) for i in range(string_size)])
    words.add(word)
string = word                # Arbitrarily search use the last word as the target

print 'Timings with string_size=%d and words_size=%d' % (string_size, words_size)
for func in (match_sort, match_multiset, match_perfect_hash, match_permutations, match_permutations_set):
    start = time()
    func(string, words)
    end = time()
    print '%-10.5f %s' % (end - start, func.__name__)
  • 1
    Agree, this case is likely to favour sorted over Counter() – AChampion Jul 1 '17 at 7:01
  • 2
    This is an excellent answer. I wish all SO answers were this good. A little disappointed in the Python2 printing/formatting, though... (just kidding!) – erewok Jan 31 at 16:25

Try this solution

list(map("".join, itertools.permutations('act')))
['act', 'atc', 'cat', 'cta', 'tac', 'tca']

We can call it listA

listA = list(map("".join, itertools.permutations('act')))

Your list is ListB

listB = ['cat', 'rat', 'dog', 'act']

Then use set intersection

list(set(listA) & set(listB))
['cat', 'act']
  • 1
    Why go through the added step of converting everything to lists? You might as well use set literals ({'cat', 'rat', 'dog', 'act'}) and leave out the list(...) for listA – Synthetica Sep 11 '17 at 11:44

Apparently you're expecting output to be sorted alphabetically, so this should do:

return sorted(set(''.join(p) for p in itertools.permutations(string)) & words)

Why even bother with permutations? This is a much simpler problem if you look at the words as dictionaries of letters. I'm sure that there's a comprehension to do it better than this, but:

    letters = dict()
    for i in word:
      letters[i] = letters.get(i, 0) + 1

do this for the word then for each word in the set, make sure that the value for each key is greater than or equal to the value of that word's key. If it is, add it to your output.

Added bonus: this should be easy to parallelize if your list of words is exceedingly long.

Just match sets of letters

set_string = set(string)    
return [w for w in words if set(w) == set_string]

Here are the timings from the top answer (Python 3.6)

0.06000    match_multiset
0.02201    match_perfect_hash
0.00900    match_sort
0.00600    comprehension  <-- This answer
0.00098    match_permutations
0.00000    match_permutations_set

protected by styvane Jan 31 at 20:32

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