12

For example

var myStructRef *Vertex
var myStruct Vertex
myStructRef = &Vertex{2, 3}
myStruct = Vertex{2, 3}

fmt.Println(myStructRef)
fmt.Println(myStruct)
changeByReferenceStruct(myStructRef)
changeByValueStruct(myStruct)
fmt.Println(myStructRef)
fmt.Println(myStruct)

And

func changeByValueStruct(myStruct Vertex) {
    myStruct.X = 5
    fmt.Println(myStruct)
}


func changeByReferenceStruct(myStruct *Vertex) {
    myStruct.X = 7
    fmt.Println(myStruct)
}

Isn't both myStructRef *Vertex and myStruct Vertex a pointer pointing to the struct itself? Why is there a discrepancy in behavior when I modify the struct in a function?

Is golang creating a new struct in changeByValueStruct when it resolves the parameter?

  • A struct value is a struct value, not a pointer to a struct value; a pointer to a struct value is a pointer, not a pointer to a pointer. What in the Go documentation gives the impression that a normal struct value is a pointer? – Adrian Jul 3 '17 at 12:38
48

When you pass a pointer as an argument, what happens under the hood is that a copy of that pointer is created and passed to the underlying function. It should not be confused with pass-by-reference.

Let's look at an example to better grasp it:

package main

import (
    "fmt"
)

type Point struct {
    x int
    y int
}

func (p Point) String() string {
    return fmt.Sprintf("(%d, %d)", p.x, p.y)
}

func modifyValue(point Point) {
    point.x += 10
}

func modifyPointer(point *Point) {
    point.x = 5
    point.y = 5
}

func modifyReference(point *Point) {
    point = &Point{5, 5}
}

func main() {
    p := Point{0, 0}
    fmt.Println(p) // prints (0, 0)
    
    modifyValue(p)
    fmt.Println(p) // prints (0, 0)
    
    modifyPointer(&p)
    fmt.Println(p) // prints (5, 5)
    
    p = Point{0, 0}
    modifyReference(&p)
    fmt.Println(p) // prints (0, 0)
}

What happens inside the modifyValue function is that a totally different instance of a Point structure is modified, so the value passed when calling the function is unaffected.

In the second example, a pointer to the structure is passed so the fields of the structure can be modified in a way that is visible from outside.

The most interesting point is made by the last function, modifyReference. If you are familiar with the pass by reference paradigm available in other languages you would expect to be able to modify the referenced object altogether, but this doesn't happen. It's because you're modifying a copy of the pointer passed as argument.

You may wonder, if everything is passed by value, when should you pass pointers and when values. Passing values assures the caller function that the passed structure cannot suffer any changes, so when you need this behaviour, go for the value. The downside of this is that a copy of the entire object is made and, if it is too big, memory becomes a concern.

If you're passing a big structure as an argument, using a pointer is better because it saves space, but you lose the guarantee that the object won't suffer any changes.

| improve this answer | |
  • Does this also hold true when the struct contains more complex data structures like a gocv.Mat (godoc.org/gocv.io/x/gocv#Mat)? – Sauraus Mar 19 '19 at 1:09
  • @Sauraus yes, depends on how you are storing references inside the complex type – Debosmit Ray Jan 28 at 18:39
  • @Nick I have been passing a struct by value to a function. Intermittenlty I am loosing some part of the data( a key with very large string is lost). Can this be because of "copy of the entire object is made and, if it is too big, memory becomes a concern."? – Farheen Nilofer Jun 24 at 8:28
  • "There's only one way of passing arguments in Go and that is by value." This statement is wrong and sadly used by many. maps, slices and pointers are reference types. – serkan Jul 2 at 14:16
5

Passing struct to function argument makes copy of values. And passing pointer of struct doesn't. So passing struct can't update field value.

package main

import (
    "fmt"
)

type Foo struct {
    value int
}

func PassStruct(foo Foo) {
    foo.value = 1
}

func PassStructPointer(foo *Foo) {
    foo.value = 1
}

func main() {
    var foo Foo

    fmt.Printf("before PassStruct: %v\n", foo.value)
    PassStruct(foo)
    fmt.Printf("after PassStruct: %v\n", foo.value)

    fmt.Printf("before PassStructPointer: %v\n", foo.value)
    PassStructPointer(&foo)
    fmt.Printf("after PassStructPointer: %v\n", foo.value)
}

https://play.golang.org/p/AM__JwyaJa

| improve this answer | |
  • But internally a variable containing struct is just a pointer to the struct right? – user3591466 Jul 2 '17 at 16:17
  • As I said in above, passing struct make copy of value. – mattn Jul 2 '17 at 16:19
  • So it creates a new struct that has the same value with different address? – user3591466 Jul 2 '17 at 16:20

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