0

Here is sample text file:

$ cat text.txt
Checking log log0.txt
12
Checking log log1.txt
Checking log log2.txt
34
56
78
Checking log log3.txt
Checking log log4.txt
Checking log log5.txt
90

How to process it using sed (or any other tool), so it will look like this:

$ cat text.txt
Checking log log0.txt
12
Checking log log2.txt
34
56
78
Checking log log5.txt
90

Pattern is "Checking"

Update: If last line has "Checking" pattern, it should be removed as well.

  • @DavyM : I didn't downvote this one, but I'm pretty sure that is because the op has provided no effort, in the form of code, in solving their question. That is pretty obvious and unacceptable for somebody who has been in SO for a while.. – sjsam Jul 3 '17 at 3:09
  • @DavyM I agree with you in that it would be ethical in posting a comment on why somebody somebody downvoted a question, and that is why you and I do :). But at the end of the day, it is upto a user to decide. – sjsam Jul 3 '17 at 3:32
  • @DavyM I agree with you. – hellish Jul 4 '17 at 12:35
  • 1
    @sjsam Actually I've spend several hours myself before asking question here. My code was just silly due to lack of sed/awk knowledge, I don't want to share it here. No point. – hellish Jul 4 '17 at 12:39
  • 1
    @hellish Not knowing something is okay but try to include at least pseudocode to show your effort when posting questions in future. Glad that you've got your answers. If any of those helped you solve the problem, you may accept that one so this question can be marked as resolved :) – sjsam Jul 4 '17 at 12:52
3

This is much easier to do with a language like awk or perl, but here's the magic:

sed -e '/[^0-9]/{ h; d; }; H; x; s/[0-9]\+\n//g;' text.txt

The magic here is that it makes use of sed's limited branching and hold space capabilities and some of the more esoteric commands. Breaking it up into explainable pieces:

/^[0-9]/ {     # for any line with a non-numeric character...
    h          # replace hold space with the line
    d          # move onto next line of input without printing anything
}
H              # Append the current line (one that is necessarily entirely
               # numeric to the hold space
x              # swap the input & hold space
s/[0-9]\+\n//g # Delete an all numeric value + carriage return
               # from start of the input space
               #
               # Content of input space prints here
  • Thank you!! this works perfect, it even removed last line if it contains only "Checking" pattern, which wasn't the case it my example (my bad). – hellish Jul 3 '17 at 12:23
3

If this isn't all you need:

$ awk '/Checking/{p=$0 ORS; next} {printf "%s", p; p=""; print} END{printf "%s", p}' file
Checking log log0.txt
12
Checking log log2.txt
34
56
78
Checking log log5.txt
90

then edit your question to include a more truly representative example.

wrt the followup question in your comments, this might be what you want:

$ awk '/Checking/{p=$0 ORS; next} {printf "%s", p; p=""; print} END{if (p !~ /Checking/) printf "%s", p}' file

There's probably a way without duplicate conditions by operating on the previous instead of current line but 2 iterations of a question are my limit :-).

  • Thanks Ed. It works, but if last line contains "Checking" pattern, it's not being removed. Sorry, example wasn't good enough (my bad). – hellish Jul 3 '17 at 12:25
  • 1
    Update your question to include an example that is good enough so we don't make another mistake. I added a possible solution to the end of my answer anyway. – Ed Morton Jul 3 '17 at 13:50
  • Maybe another possible solution to cases where the last file is empty would be something like the following: awk '/Checking/{p=$0 ORS; next} {printf "%s", p; p=""; print} END{if (getline == 1) {printf "%s", p}}' file – John Paraskevopoulos Oct 31 '17 at 15:37
  • There only is 1 input file. I don't understand what you think the problem is you're trying to solve but if you're in the END section then you've already reached the end of the input and so getline is guaranteed to fail so whatever you think the problem is, that won't solve it. – Ed Morton Oct 31 '17 at 15:41
2

Another simple solution using pcregrep

$ pcregrep -M "^.*$\n\d+" text.txt 
Checking log log0.txt
12
Checking log log2.txt
34
56
78
Checking log log5.txt
90
1

If you prefer sed:

$ cat test.sed
# If line starts with a number:
/^[0-9]/{
# Exchange hold space and patter space
x
# If line is not empty, print it
/^..*/p
# Exchange again
x
# Print the line
p
# Empty contents of pattern space
s/^.*$//
# Put empty line in hold space
h
}

# If line starts with 'Checking' put it in hold space
/^Checking/h

$ cat test.txt
Checking log log0.txt
12
Checking log log1.txt
Checking log log2.txt
34
56
78
Checking log log3.txt
Checking log log4.txt
Checking log log5.txt
90

$ sed -n -f test.sed test.txt
Checking log log0.txt
12
Checking log log2.txt
34
56
78
Checking log log5.txt
90
1

You can make use of the hold space in sed along with exchange(or x) [check here] option and some branching(or b) like below to achieve your goal.

# cat 44876377
Checking log log0.txt
12
Checking log log1.txt
Checking log log2.txt
34
56
78
Checking log log3.txt
Checking log log4.txt
Checking log log5.txt
90
# sed -En '/^Checking/h;/^[0-9]+$/{x;G;:l;p;n;/^[0-9]+$/bl}' 44876377
Checking log log0.txt
12
Checking log log2.txt
34
56
78
Checking log log5.txt
90

Note: Though I feel the awk method mentioned [here] is the easiest way to do this.

1

GNU grep, using the -B or --before-context option:

grep --no-group-separator -B 1 '^[0-9]\+$' text.txt

Output:

Checking log log0.txt
12
Checking log log2.txt
34
56
78
Checking log log5.txt
90
1
sed 'N;/^[^0-9].*\n[^0-9]/!P;D'

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.