2

I have a class that is like so:

public sealed class Contract
{
    public bool isExpired { get; set; }
    public DateTime ExpirationDate { get; set; }
    public void MarkAsExpired()
    {
        this.isExpired = true;
        // Other stuff..
    }
}

What I would like to do is the following: Once ExpirationDate is reached, MarkAsExpired should be called. In case the program closes and by the time it re-opens, ExpirationDate has passed, the same should happen. If isExpired is true nothing should happen at all.

Contracts are modifiable, and new ones are added frequently. My exact expected volume is unknown.

I have already though of a way this could be done via a generalizable extension method for DateTime objects:

var contracts = new List<Contract>();
foreach (var contract in contracts.Where(contract => !contract.isExpired))
{
    contract.ExpirationDate.ExecuteWhenPassed(() => contract.MarkAsExpired());
}

The problem is in writing the extension method itself. I have already created a working solution:

static void ExecuteWhenPassed(this DateTime date, Action action)
{
    // Check if date has already passed
    if (date <= DateTime.Now)
    {
        action();
    }
    else
    {
        // Timer will fire when $date is reached
        var timer = new Timer { Interval = date.Subtract(DateTime.Now).TotalMilliseconds, AutoReset = false };
        timer.Elapsed += (s, e) => action();
        timer.Start();
    }
}

And it works perfectly. However, I'm concerned about its efficiency. Specifically, I'm concerned about the overhead involved in creating a separate timer for each and every Contract instance, of which there might be hundreds that have yet to expire.

Is the overhead significant? If so, what would be a more efficient way of dealing with this issue?

I'm open to completely different approaches, as long as my issue of handling the expiration is solved.

  • You can create a separate class for managing the timer alone, and make your contracts subscribe to it. Then you can do all your logic inside the custom timer class to decide which one is expired and make call to the respective contracts. I may not be able to explain more clearly, but a search on observer pattern or Publisher-subscriber pattern will give you some idea. – Thangadurai Jul 3 '17 at 7:04
  • have you looked at quartz-scheduler.net its built for job scheduling. It will save you a lot of time and you wont have to build your own timer logic – Tjaart van der Walt Jul 3 '17 at 7:04
  • 1
    @lkdhruw I don't think that will make a difference – stybl Jul 3 '17 at 7:13
  • 1
    "Hundreds" is not a whole lot, but having even a few unreachable and uncontrollable Timers.Timer instances floating around is not attractive. I'm not sure if they are safe from the GC for instance. – Henk Holterman Jul 3 '17 at 7:43
  • 2
    It's better to use one timer and fire it right when next contract will expire (so order them by expiration time and find closest one). When timer fires - mark target contract as expired and repeat the same procedure (find next closest for expiration). If you modify contracts collection (add\remove something, change expiration date) - dispose current timer and repeat procedure. – Evk Jul 3 '17 at 7:48
4

I would suggest using Microsoft's Reactive Framework (NuGet "System.Reactive") for this. It becomes super easy.

Here's the code:

List<Contract> contracts = new List<Contract>();

/* populate `contracts` here before `query` */  

IObservable<Contract> query =
    from i in Observable.Interval(TimeSpan.FromMinutes(1.0))
    from c in contracts
    where !c.isExpired
    where c.ExpirationDate <= DateTime.Now
    select c;

IDisposable subscription =
    query
        .Subscribe(c => c.MarkAsExpired());

What this is doing is setting up an observable timer (Observable.Interval(TimeSpan.FromMinutes(1.0))) that fires a value every minute. And then, every minute, it filters the list of contracts to just those that haven't expired and who expiration data is earlier than now.

Then in the subscription it just takes a stream of these values and marks them as expired.

If you want to stop processing you just call subscription.Dispose(). It's a very simple bit of code.

If you're running this code on Windows Forms you can do a .ObserveOn(instanceOfFormOrControl) to marshall back to the UI thread. On WPF it is .ObserveOnDispatcher(). That code goes just before the .Subscribe(...).

  • It would appear that someone took the downvote hammer to all answers for some reason. I actually like this solution, and will use it unless any alternatives are found. – stybl Jul 3 '17 at 7:28
  • Could the down-voter please let me know where this falls short in their opinion? – Enigmativity Jul 3 '17 at 7:28
  • @stybl - The Reactive Framework (Rx) is really quite neat. I hardly use any event, async, or timer code anymore. Rx just does all those things beautifully well. – Enigmativity Jul 3 '17 at 7:30
  • I think you should emphasize the 1 minute resolution here, and the trade off with performance. This won't scale down to near real-time situations. – Henk Holterman Jul 3 '17 at 7:45
  • 1
    @stybl - Observable.Using(() => new Context(), contex => /* return observable */). You use this for any disposable resource - Rx will then manage the disposable's lifetime for you. – Enigmativity Jul 5 '17 at 14:10
1

There is no need to use one timer per contract, you can do that with one timer overall. Find next item to be expired and create timer. When timer fires - expire this item, then dispose timer and repeat procedure. Benefits include: items expire approximately at time stated in their ExpirationTime (no "every minute\second" polling), at max one timer, if no items to expire - no timers. Sample code (instead of having separate MarkAsExpired method - you can do your logic inside IsExpired property setter):

public interface IExpirable {
    bool IsExpired { get; set; }
    DateTime ExpirationTime { get; }
}

public class ExpirationManager {
    private readonly List<IExpirable> _items = new List<IExpirable>();
    public ExpirationManager(IEnumerable<IExpirable> items) {
        _items.AddRange(items);
        Trigger();
    }

    public void Add(IExpirable item) {
        lock (_items)
            _items.Add(item);
        // reset current timer and repeat
        Trigger();
    }

    public void Remove(IExpirable item) {
        lock (_items)
            _items.Remove(item);
        // reset current timer and repeat
        Trigger();
    }

    private Timer _timer;
    private void Trigger() {
        // reset first
        if (_timer != null) {
            _timer.Dispose();
            _timer = null;
        }
        IExpirable next;
        lock (_items) {
            next = _items.Where(c => !c.IsExpired).OrderBy(c => c.ExpirationTime).FirstOrDefault();
        }
        if (next == null)
            return; // no more items to expire
        var dueTime = next.ExpirationTime - DateTime.Now;
        if (dueTime < TimeSpan.Zero) {
            // already expired, process here
            next.IsExpired = true;
            // and repeat
            Trigger();
        }
        else {
            _timer = new Timer(TimerTick, next, dueTime, Timeout.InfiniteTimeSpan);
        }
    }

    private void TimerTick(object state) {
        ((IExpirable)state).IsExpired = true;
        // repeat
        Trigger();
    }
}
0

The following answer assumes a collection of active contracts, sorted by time.

static List<Contract> ActiveContracts = new List<Contract>();
// ...
ActiveContracts.AddRange(contracts.Where(x => !x.isExpired));
ActiveContracts.Sort((e1, e2) => e1.ExpirationDate.CompareTo(e2.ExpirationDate));

This assumption is mainly for performance, my approach will also work without it, just the efficiency might suffer when contracts are filtered and sorted in every update. The actual choice might depend on, how often contracts are added to the list or contract dates change.

Use a timer that will execute its next update event whenever needed - first update right after the start (1ms), subsequent updates will depend on available expiration dates

// trigger initially in 1ms
System.Timers.Timer timer = new System.Timers.Timer(1);
timer.Elapsed += timer_Elapsed;
timer.AutoReset = false;
timer.Start();

In the elapsed event, update all contracts with past expired date and set the new interval according to the nearest expiration date in the future

static void timer_Elapsed(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e)
{
    var t = sender as System.Timers.Timer;
    while (ActiveContracts.Any())
    {
        var item = ActiveContracts[0];
        if (item.ExpirationDate > DateTime.Now)
        {
            break;
        }
        item.MarkAsExpired();
        ActiveContracts.RemoveAt(0);
    }
    if (ActiveContracts.Any())
    {
        // specially when debugging, the time difference can lead to a negative new interval - don't assign directly
        var nextInterval = (ActiveContracts[0].ExpirationDate - DateTime.Now).TotalMilliseconds;
        t.Interval = nextInterval > 0 ? nextInterval : 1;
        t.Start();
    }
    else
    {
        t.Stop();
    }
}

If you expect the contracts list to change between intervals, you might want to define an upper interval limit (if (nextInterval > XXX) nextInterval = XXX;). If you expect an empty list to re-fill with new contracts, replace t.Stop(); by t.Interval = XXX;

0

First let me say that, regardless of the efficiency concept your solution is elegant and perfect but you are right, having more threads does not necessarily mean achieving an efficient system. As you now, when you use the timer, you are actually creating a background threads which have to tick the time and fire your desired action in a right moment. Now according to the evidence, in a real situation you will have hundred of them. The problem is that the resources will be shared between all these threads and this can be a serious issue, if your cod is a server-side one. So if I had the same issue I would choose another solution. I would accept a reasonable tolerance. This tolerance is not a fixed amount but it is computed every time you fire the action. This solution is not as accurate as yours but it still lets server to save more resources. Using this approach you will only have one background thread which expires nominated items.

Lets look at the code :

var timer = new Timer {Interval = ComputeAvgTime(), AutoReset = true};
timer.Elapsed += timer_Elapsed;
timer.Start();

ComputeAvgTime computes the optimized amount.

 static double ComputeAvgTime()
        {
            //For all items wich are not expired yet.
            var contractExpTime = new List<DateTime>();
            var timeStamp = DateTime.Now;
            //Sample Data
            contractExpTime.Add(timeStamp.AddMilliseconds(2000));
            contractExpTime.Add(timeStamp.AddMilliseconds(3000));
            contractExpTime.Add(timeStamp.AddMilliseconds(5000));
            //
            var total = contractExpTime.Where(item => item > timeStamp).Aggregate<DateTime, double>(0, (current, item) => item.Subtract(timeStamp).TotalMilliseconds + current);
            var avg = total / contractExpTime.Count(item => item > timeStamp);
            return avg;
        }

Finally set the items

static void timer_Elapsed(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e)
 {
            //Fetch all items which are not expired yet.
            // Set all Expired.
            // Save all items.
 }

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