6

The article http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/dd419663.aspx has the following code sample:

public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

protected virtual void OnPropertyChanged(string propertyName)
{       
    PropertyChangedEventHandler handler = this.PropertyChanged;
    if (handler != null)
    {
        var e = new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName);
        handler(this, e);
    }
}

My question is what is gained by introducing the variable 'handler' - the following code seems to work fine:

public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

protected virtual void OnPropertyChanged(string propertyName)
{   
    if (PropertyChanged!= null)
    {
        var e = new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName);
        PropertyChanged(this, e);
    }
}
  • 3
    Is it not possible that the listner might remove its handle in a multi-threaded envrionment after the != null call? – Adriaan Stander Dec 20 '10 at 12:48
  • You should make this an answer. – Cubicle Dec 20 '10 at 13:06
5

The reasoning behind the local variable is that in a multi-threaded environment, the event could be devoid of subscribers (ie, become null) in the gap between checking for null and firing the event.

By taking a local variable, you are avoiding this potential issue - checking the event in a thread-safe way. It does raise the issue that the event might be thrown for an item that had previously unhooked.

  • Hmm, it is exactly as rare as getting the null reference exception. – Hans Passant Dec 20 '10 at 15:55
  • Actually, it is possibly less rare - the null situation occurs when the list becomes empty and becomes empty during the gap, the false calling wouldn't need an empty list, just the gap lol – Adam Houldsworth Dec 20 '10 at 16:18
  • I wonder if, Adam or Hans, you have any comment on the point I raised under MattDavey's answer above. – sturdytree Dec 20 '10 at 18:22
  • @sturdytree delegates are immutable so you are grabbing a copy, not a reference in this instance. Hence even if the source is null, your copy isn't. – Adam Houldsworth Dec 20 '10 at 19:19
  • Adam, thanks, I just read on MSDN that "Delegates are immutable; once created, the invocation list of a delegate does not change". I take that to mean that when a method is added to/removed from a delegate, .Net creates a new delegate object. So handler in the code sample would still reference the old object even if a listener had unsubscribed from PropertyChanged in the meantime (PropertyChanged would then point to a newly created object). Is that understanding correct? – sturdytree Dec 20 '10 at 19:56
1

This is done for thread safety. In the second example is it possible that the invocation list of PropertyChanged could become null during the if block, resulting in an exception.

  • Thanks Matt, 'handler' is referencing the same object as 'PropertyChanged', so if a sole listener detaches from 'PropertyChanged' on another thread after the null check, would that not make handler null too? Or has it something to do with handler being a local variable? – sturdytree Dec 20 '10 at 14:22
0

This is to ensure that the OnPropertyChanged method is thread safe. See Use of null check in event handler for another discussion.

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