3

Why are [range(10)] and list(range(10)) different in Python 3?

Output is as follows:

>>> print([range(10)])
[range(0, 10)]
>>> print(list(range(10)))
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
  • I know this has been asked before, but I can't find a dupe target. Google isn't turning up anything relevant. – user2357112 supports Monica Jul 4 '17 at 6:24
  • @JanHudec Thanks for replying, but can you expand more on what you mean by that? – Seoul Jul 4 '17 at 6:25
  • @user2357112 Yes I tried to look it up as well and just decided to ask even if I got down votes, since it's better to learn than worry about points – Seoul Jul 4 '17 at 6:26
  • @ChristianDean: No, that one won't do. That question is about how to construct an empty list or dict, and the answers focus on timing. It doesn't cover the semantics of using [] or list to create a list with elements. – user2357112 supports Monica Jul 4 '17 at 6:33
  • This one looks better, but I think the dict in that question is too distracting for that question to serve as a good []-vs-list dupe target. – user2357112 supports Monica Jul 4 '17 at 6:38
11

Quoting the docs, "lists may be constructed in several ways":

[range(10)]

builds a list of 1 item, the range object. In general a comma separated list of items enclosed in square brackets constructs a list of said items.

list(range(10))

passes the range object as an argument to the list constructor:

class list([iterable])

The constructor builds a list whose items are the same and in the same order as iterable‘s items. iterable may be either a sequence, a container that supports iteration, or an iterator object. If iterable is already a list, a copy is made and returned, similar to iterable[:]. For example, list('abc') returns ['a', 'b', 'c'] and list( (1, 2, 3) ) returns [1, 2, 3]. If no argument is given, the constructor creates a new empty list, [].

A range in Python 3 represents an immutable sequence of numbers, so in your case the resulting list is a list of numbers from the range.

5

[x] means "make a list whose one element is x".

list(x) means "make a list whose elements are the elements of x".

range(10) returns an object that prints as range(0, 10) (since it shows the starting value when it prints) and whose elements are the integers from 0 to 9, so [range(10)] gives the one-element list [range(0, 10)] and list(range(10)) gives the 10-element list [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9].

1

In your first example you are simply creating a list object using square bracket notation, and placing a range() object inside. On the other hand, in your second example, you use the list() builtin to convert the range() object to a list.

The difference, is that using [] simply creates a list. It does nothing to the contents passed in. list() on the other hand, will either return an empty list if you pass nothing in, or attempt to convert what you passed in to a list object.

The documentation for list() notes this:

The constructor builds a list whose items are the same and in the same order as iterable‘s items. iterable may be either a sequence, a container that supports iteration, or an iterator object. If iterable is already a list, a copy is made and returned, similar to iterable[:]. For example, list('abc') returns ['a', 'b', 'c'] and list( (1, 2, 3) ) returns [1, 2, 3]. If no argument is given, the constructor creates a new empty list, [].

-1

range() function in python 3.x is similar to the xrange() function in python 2.x.In Python 2.x range() produced a list, and xrange() returned an iterator - a sequence object

In python 2.x

>>> range(1)
[0]
>>> type(range(1))
<type 'list'>

In python 3.x

>>> range(1)
range(0, 1)
>>> type(range(1))
<class 'range'>

And to get a list, you can pass the generator in list()

>>> print (list(range(10)))
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]

For further reference , read here

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