23

Given the following example code:

int var;
int mvar;
std::mutex mvar_mutex;

void f(){
    mvar_mutex.lock();
    mvar = var * var;
    mvar_mutex.unlock();
}

I want to express that mvar_mutex is bound to the variable mvar and protects only that variable. mvar_mutex should not protect var because it is not bound to it. Hence the compiler would be allowed to transform the above code into the below code:

int var;
int mvar;
std::mutex mvar_mutex;

void f(){
    int r = var * var; //possible data race created if binding is not known
    mvar_mutex.lock();
    mvar = r;
    mvar_mutex.unlock();
}

This might reduce contention on the lock as less work is being done while holding it.

For int this can be done using std::atomic<int> mvar; and removing mvar_mutex, but for other types such as std::vector<int> this is not possible.

How do I express the mutex-variable binding in a way that C++ compilers understand it and do the optimization? It should be allowed to reorder any variable up or down across mutex boundaries for any variable that is not bound to that mutex

Since the code is being generated using clang::ASTConsumer and clang::RecursiveASTVisitor I am willing to use non-standard extensions and AST manipulations as long as clang (ideally clang 4.0) supports them and the resulting code does not need to be elegant or human-readable.

Edit since this seems to be causing confusion: The above transformation is not legal in C++. The described binding of mutex to variable doesn't exist. The question is about how to implement that or achieve the same effect.

  • 1
    Are you sure that compiler is allowed to move the multiplication before the lock? It shouldn't do it since the multiplication is also protected by the lock. If compiler is allowed to move in such way then lots of codes should break down. – taskinoor Jul 4 '17 at 11:26
  • 1
    @taskinoor No, it isn't allowed to. But that is what OP wants to achieve. The compiler should be signalled that it should only protect mvar. – Sombrero Chicken Jul 4 '17 at 11:28
  • 5
    use a lock_guard or unique_lock instead of manually locking and unlocking the lock. – Paul Rooney Jul 4 '17 at 11:28
  • 2
    @ComicSansMS An alternative way of expressing it is this: mutex.lock creates a barrier where code can move down, but not up. mutex.unlock creates a barrier where code can move up, but not down. (barriers cannot cross barriers). I want to modify it so the barriers only apply to the one specific object and other code can be moved around freely. For example replacing the mutex.lock with acquire_barrier<mvar>(); and mutex.unlock with release_barrier<mvar>(); would be an acceptable solution if those functions were implementable with the desired reordering behavior. – nwp Jul 11 '17 at 13:11
  • 4
    @nwp Please, explain why do need this. In real scenarios, std::atomic and lock-free algorithms should fulfill your needs. – Andrey Nasonov Jul 12 '17 at 23:14
10

If you wish to achieve that the std::mutex will only be held until an operation is performed on the protected object, you can write a wrapper class as follows:

#include <cstdio>
#include <mutex>

template<typename T>
class LockAssignable {
public:
    LockAssignable& operator=(const T& t) {
        std::lock_guard<std::mutex> lk(m_mutex);
        m_protected = t;
        return *this;
    }
    operator T() const {
        std::lock_guard<std::mutex> lk(m_mutex);
        return m_protected;
    }    
    /* other stuff */
private:
    mutable std::mutex m_mutex;
    T m_protected {};
};

inline int factorial(int n) {
    return (n > 1 ? n * factorial(n - 1) : 1);
}

int main() {
    int var = 5;
    LockAssignable<int> mvar;

    mvar = factorial(var);
    printf("Result: %d\n", static_cast<int>(mvar));
    return 0;
}

In the example above the factorial will be calculated in advance and the m_mutex will be acquired only when the assignment or the implicit conversion operator being called on mvar.

Assembly Output

  • The reason why the example doesn't satisfy the requirement is that printf and whatever it does is being protected by mvar_mutex. It should only protect mvar. The compiler should be allowed to move the printf outside of the lock block, but it isn't with this implementation. Same with the wrapper class. The mutex it uses not only protects m_protected but also synchronizes code around it, which it should not do. – nwp Jul 13 '17 at 8:56
  • @nwp, I edited my first example due to the printf was only there for feedback purposes. The int r = factorial(var) part was which I mean that is outside of the critical section protected by std::mutex. – Akira Jul 13 '17 at 9:00
  • Now there is an unprotected read on mvar. You can change it to printf("Result: %d\n", r); to fix that, but there is still the issue that the printf should be allowed to move up above the lock block, but the mutex prevents that even though there is no mvar in the printf anymore. Also the point is to not do all reordering that the compiler is supposed to do manually. The goal is to allow the compiler to rearrange code as it sees fit. – nwp Jul 13 '17 at 9:03
8
+500

For the primitive data types you can use std::atomic with std::memory_order_relaxed. The documentation states that:

there are no synchronization or ordering constraints imposed on other reads or writes, only this operation's atomicity is guaranteed

In the following example, the atomicity of the assignation is guaranteed, but the compiler should be able to move the operations.

std::atomic<int> z = {0};
int a = 3;
z.store(a*a, std::memory_order_relaxed);

For objects, I thought of several solutions, but:

  • There is no standard way to remove ordering requirements from std::mutex.
  • It is not possible to create a std::atomic<std::vector>.
  • It is not possible to create a spinlock using std::memory_order_relaxed (see the example).

I have found some answers that state that:

  • If the function is not visible in the compilation unit, the compiler generates a barrier because it does not know which variables it uses.
  • If the function is visible and there is a mutex, the compiler generates a barrier. For example, see this and this

So, in order to express that mvar_mutex is bound to the variable, you can use some classes as stated by the other answers but I do not think it is possible to fully allow the reordering of the code.

3

I want to express that mvar_mutex is bound to the variable mvar and protects only that variable.

You can't do this. A mutex actually guards the critical region of machine instructons between the acquisition and release. Only by convention is that associated with a particular instance of shared data.

To avoid doing unnecessary steps inside the critical region, keep the critical regions as simple as possible. In a critical region, only with local variables which the compiler can "see" are obviously not shared with other threads, and with one set of shared data belonging to that mutex. Try not to access other data in the critical region that might be suspected of being shared.

If you could have your proposed language feature, it would only introduce the possibility of error into a program. All it does is take code which is now correct, and make some of it incorrect (in exchange for the promise of some speed: that some code stays correct and is faster, because extraneous computations are moved out of the critical region).

It's like taking a language which already has a nice order of evaluation, in which a[i] = i++ is well defined, and screwing it up with unspecified evaluation order.

  • Obviously weakening guarantees for all C++ programs would generally break C++ programs. I don't want to do that for all C++ programs, just for some of mine. I know that mutex barriers tend to be hardware instructions that are not able to express that some instructions can pass the barrier while others cannot. However, it should be possible to tell that to the compiler which is not bound by the instruction set during optimization phases. I do like this answer though as it is not just "wrap the mutex in some class" but actually tries to answer the question. – nwp Jul 17 '17 at 21:31
  • If you had this, you would break your own C++ programs some of the time thinking you're immune because you invented it. :) :) – Kaz Jul 17 '17 at 21:34
3

How about a locked var template ?

template<typename Type, typename Mutex = std::mutex>
class Lockable
{
public:
   Lockable(_Type t) : var_(std::move(t));
   Lockable(_Type&&) = default;
   // ...  could need a bit more

   T operator = (const T& x) 
   { 
      std::lock_guard<Lockable> lock(*this);
      var_ = x;
      return x;
   }

   T operator *() const
   { 
      std::lock_guard<Lockable> lock(*this);
      return var_;
   }

   void lock() const   { const_cast<Lockable*>(this)->mutex_.lock(); }
   void unlock() const { const_cast<Lockable*>(this)->mutex_.unlock().; }
private:
  Mutex mutex_;
  Type var_;
};

locked by assignment operator

Lockable<int>var;
var = mylongComputation();

Works great with lock_guard

Lockable<int>var;
std::lock_guard<Lockable<int>> lock(var);
var = 3;

Practical on containers

Lockable<std::vector<int>> vec;

etc...

  • It is fairly elegant, but doesn't solve the problem as the compiler is not allowed to move computations out of the area protected by the lock_guard. – nwp Jul 5 '17 at 8:15
  • 4
    There is no compiler options against bugs in code.Might as well use atomic<> – Michaël Roy Jul 5 '17 at 11:51
  • 8
    Why const_cast? Is not mutable _Mutex a better solution? – bartop Jul 12 '17 at 7:23
  • The const_cast is so that you can lock an read a const _Type. – Michaël Roy Jul 12 '17 at 12:19
  • 1
    The noexcept needs to be conditional. returning a string by value can most definitely throw. – Mooing Duck Jul 17 '17 at 21:51
1

You can use folly::Synchronized to make sure that the variable is only accessed under a lock:

int var;
folly::Synchronized<int> vmar;

void f() {
  *mvar.wlock() = var * var;
}
  • 1
    Digging through the code I'm fairly sure that all that folly::Synchronized does is automatically lock and unlock an std::mutex. It is thus only a different implementation of LockAssignable from Akira's answer and does not allow reordering of code due to the barriers of std::mutex. – nwp Jul 14 '17 at 9:04
  • folly::Synchronized is more than just LockAssignable, but assignment operator is indeed the part most relevant to your example. – vitaut Jul 15 '17 at 12:45
  • 1
    @nwp, you can avoid std::mutex with some kind of spinlocks, as the Boost.Lockfree library does but with specific types with really fast operations. I wouldn't use a spinlock on std::vector::push_back with possible reallocation in the background. – Akira Jul 17 '17 at 20:44
1

I want to express that mvar_mutex is bound to the variable mvar and protects only that variable.

This is not how a mutex works. It doesn't "bind" to anything in order to protect it. You are still free to access this object directly, in complete disregard with any sort of thread safety whatsoever.

What you should do is hide away the "protected variable" so that it is not directly accessible at all, and write an interface that manipulates it that goes through the mutex. This way you ensure that access to the underlying data is protected by that mutex. It can be a single object, it can be a functional group of objects, it can be a collection of many objects, mutexes and atomics, designed to minimize blocking.

  • The problem I have is not to protect a variable. std::mutex and std::unique_lock cover that nicely. The problem is that std::mutex, no matter if hidden behind some class or not, will impose restrictions on variables that have nothing to do with the std::mutex. – nwp Jul 17 '17 at 22:31
  • Not necessarily - you build the access interface to go through the mutex only when necessary. Maybe you should elaborate on your "restrictions" assumption. – dtech Jul 18 '17 at 7:31
  • An example would be foo++; std::unique_lock<std::mutex>(mvar_mutex); foo--;. I would expect the compiler to optimize away foo++; and foo--;, but it cannot, because the semantics of the mutex barriers don't allow that. I want to find a way to allow that. – nwp Jul 18 '17 at 8:04
  • Yeah... how about something that makes practical sense :) For example in the OP mvar = var * var; - you can do that, but mvar will be a wrapper object that implements the = operator, so the CPU will first compute the multiplication and only lock the underlying data for the duration of the assignment. The idea of tucking away the mutex is to not lock and unlock it manually, but have the wrapper object do that for you, only when necessary. – dtech Jul 18 '17 at 9:59

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