I have the following class:

class temp_con():
    def __init__(self):
        self.t = 0
    @property
    def t(self):
        return self.t
    @t.setter
    def t(self,value):
        self.t = value

I need to use it to compare against a number following this logic:

if num <= temp_con.t - 2:
    #dothing

However i get the error:

Type error: unsupported operand type for -: 'property' and 'int'<

I have tried int(temp_con.t) and getattr(temp_con, t) but those did not work.

How can I utilize the property as an int?

  • 4
    return self.t doesn't return 0, it returns the function t (which is a property getter). You should distinguish between the attribute and the property getter. Set self._t = 0 – Peter Wood Jul 4 '17 at 21:59
  • 1
    This question seems to be confused on multiple fronts about the difference between members of a class and members of an instance of a class. For example, temp_con is declared as a class, but in the usage example it appears temp_con is also being used as a variable which is expected to be an instance. – Daniel Pryden Jul 4 '17 at 22:00
  • answer was a combination of the first 2 answers. – drako234 Jul 4 '17 at 22:12
up vote 6 down vote accepted

You need to use separate names for the property and the attribute it wraps. A good convention is to use the property name prefixed with a _ as the attribute name.

class TempCon:
    def __init__(self):
        self._t = 0

    @property
    def t(self):
        return self._t

    @t.setter
    def t(self, value):
        self._t = value

Then you can access the property on an instance of the class.

temp_con = TempCon()
print(temp_con.t)
temp_con.t = 5
print(temp_con.t)

You're accessing t on CLASS, not on an OBJECT of CLASS.

Try:

q = temp_con()
if num <= q.t - 2:
  pass

In you code temp_con.t returns property object, which wraps getter (and setter) you've defined in your class code, but it doesnt execute it.

UPDATE: (memo: read twice) There's also another problem with your code. First (well, it's second in code, but it will happen first) you define getter t, then later you OVERWRITE it with self.t = 0. As a result you'll get (as t) property accessible as a class member (which happens in your example) and value 0 as object's member.

You need an instance of the class in order to use the property and, as pointed out in other answers, you need to use a different name for your object variable. Try:

class temp_con():
    def __init__(self):
    self._t = 0
@property
    def t(self):
    return self._t
@t.setter
    def t(self,value):
    self._t = value

my_temp_con = temp_con()

if num <= my_temp_con.t - 2:
    pass

Thus, to access the value of the property and not the property function, you have to access it through my_temp_con.t.

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