1

Modern C++ compilers are required by the standard to #define the macro __cplusplus.

This is often used in files that can be used by both C and C++ but the implementation differs slightly.

But in C (and C++ for that matter), the behaviour on using any double underscore in an identifier is undefined!

So therefore, if a C compiler sees something like

#ifdef __cplusplus

then is the behaviour undefined?

  • Why should the behaviour be undefined? – Jabberwocky Jul 5 '17 at 11:19
  • 1
    Using __variable is discouraged as it is supposed to be used by implementation. Using __cplusplus is fine – dlmeetei Jul 5 '17 at 11:21
  • 4
    It's not undefined.... such identifier names are reserved... stackoverflow.com/a/25090719/1347519 – Attie Jul 5 '17 at 11:21
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    From what I've observed, putting C and C++ together can incite the wrath of the downvoters. I was careful to only tag the principal language I was concerned with, and explain the relevant parts of the C++ in the actual question. I've put it back. – Willy Wonka Jul 5 '17 at 11:23
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    If this was UB, how should anyone ever use __FUNCTION__, __LINE__ or similar predefined macros? – Gerhardh Jul 5 '17 at 11:53
2

Using such names for creating your own macros or identifiers invokes undefined behavior. C11 7.1.3 (emphasis mine):

7.1.3 Reserved identifiers
1 Each header declares or defines all identifiers listed in its associated subclause, and optionally declares or defines identifiers listed in its associated future library directions subclause and identifiers which are always reserved either for any use or for use as file scope identifiers.
— All identifiers that begin with an underscore and either an uppercase letter or another underscore are always reserved for any use.
...

2 No other identifiers are reserved. If the program declares or defines an identifier in a context in which it is reserved (other than as allowed by 7.1.4), or defines a reserved identifier as a macro name, the behavior is undefined.

However, you are of course always free to use the macros/identifiers provided by the compiler/lib, given that they are made available in a scope you are supposed to have access to.

8

But in C (and C++ for that matter), the behaviour on using any double underscore in an identifier is undefined!

You're mixing things up. It's not undefined behavior to use one, it's just that the names are reserved. The key point is you can't define some yourself, but it's fine to use them.

From ISO 9899:2011:

7.1.3 Reserved identifiers

— All identifiers that begin with an underscore and either an uppercase letter or another underscore are always reserved for any use.

  • @WillyWonka To extend on this: Even if such an identifier was defined by a C implementation, there are two possible cases: as an identifier of the core language: #ifdef is a preprocessor directive, so it will fail. If it is defined as a macro, #ifdef will succeed, hence the guarded part will be processed. That could indeed result in problems; I'm afraid you have to rely this specific (and some other) names are used reasonably by the implementer. – too honest for this site Jul 5 '17 at 11:28
1

The corresponding part from the standard is(emphasis mine):

7.1.3 Reserved identifiers

1 Each header declares or defines all identifiers listed in its associated subclause, and optionally declares or defines identifiers listed in its associated future library directions subclause and identifiers which are always reserved either for any use or for use as file scope identifiers.

So a little bit contrary to what Ven posted, this is an implicit requirement to not use them at all, since they are also reserved for future purposes.

This is also stated more strict under section 2 of 7.1.3:

No other identifiers are reserved. If the program declares or defines an identifier in a context in which it is reserved (other than as allowed by 7.1.4), or defines a reserved identifier as a macro name, the behavior is undefined.

So they are strictly reserved for future implementations, which for example __cplusplus is making use of, as the first rule that defines what is reserved states:

— All identifiers that begin with an underscore and either an uppercase letter or another underscore are always reserved for any use.

But since your example is implemented by the standard by using an identifier from that mentioned reserved spectrum it is fine.

Additionally the example you are giving is actually not declaring/defining an identifier but checking if there is a preprocessing token(macro) is defined with the name __cplusplus what would be totally ok by means of the C standard aswell, since its checking if it exists, not declaring anything. If you would have defined it your self, it would be not strictly respecting the C standard and cause possible undefined behavior.

0

No, there's no undefined behaviour in this case. Undefined behaviour means the compiler makers are free of doing whatever they want with the affected resources. This means you are free (in this context) to define new non clashing underscored identifiers to be accepted in the two languages the compiler is able to implement. Think that the internals of the standard libraries implementations of compiler libraries can be full of such undefined behaviours as far as the compiler behaves correctly in the defined behaviour part. In the case commented, the macro __cplusplus is defined ONLY in C++ (by the compiler itself), and it is as a preprocessor flag to indicate that you are compiling a c++ source. Putting it between the #ifndef __cplusplus and the following #endif statements, makes it to exclude for compilation the in between code (normally, because it would lead to a syntactic error or an unsupported feature). Normally, you will find the following construct in some/many C/C++ standard headers in your system (so they can be used in both C and C++):

#ifndef __cplusplus
extern "C" {
#endif
...
#ifndef __cplusplus
}
#endif

to avoid the extern "C" {} construct, which is C++ specific, and would raise a compiler error in plain C.

NOTE

of course, if you #define __cplusplus before including any of these files, you'll get your C compiler shouting at you about bad syntax on including such a header file. You can try this yourself to see how it happens:

pru.c

#define __cplusplus 20170301
#include <stdio.h>
int main()
{
    printf("Hello, world!\n");
} /* main */

and then compilation of this gives:

$ make pru
cc -O -pipe  pru.c  -o pru
In file included from pru.c:2:
/usr/include/stdio.h:159:1: error: expected identifier or '('
__BEGIN_DECLS
^
/usr/include/sys/cdefs.h:59:30: note: expanded from macro '__BEGIN_DECLS'
#define __BEGIN_DECLS   extern "C" {
                               ^
In file included from pru.c:2:
/usr/include/stdio.h:235:1: error: expected identifier or '('
__BEGIN_DECLS
^
/usr/include/sys/cdefs.h:59:30: note: expanded from macro '__BEGIN_DECLS'
#define __BEGIN_DECLS   extern "C" {
                               ^
pru.c:6:2: warning: implicitly declaring library function 'printf' with type 'int (const char *, ...)' [-Wimplicit-function-declaration]
        printf("Hello, world!\n");
        ^
pru.c:6:2: note: include the header <stdio.h> or explicitly provide a declaration for 'printf'
1 warning and 3 errors generated.
*** Error code 1

Stop.
make: stopped in /home/user

Think that you are never going to move the standard header files to another computer to compile your source code. Should you try this, then you would have undefined behaviour, but never while respecting the compiler implementation. This means, you have to accept the compiler makers to use those undefined behaviour things that result in compiler implementation details, but you cannot do that in your code (at least if you don't want to fail into your program doing nasty things)

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