59

How can I convert a Ruby Date to an integer?

  • 2
    What should this integer represent? – Phrogz Dec 20 '10 at 18:21
  • I need to display a graph. So I want to scale the dates. MinDate will be zero. Max date will be 100 – Brig Dec 20 '10 at 19:14
  • Then, as shown in my solution, simply subtract two Date objects to get the number of days between them. If you actually mean date/timestamps, you can also subtract Time objects (in which case you get the number of seconds between them, or you can use DateTime objects (which yield fractional days between instances). – Phrogz Dec 20 '10 at 19:24
  • possible duplicate of Ruby/Rails: converting a Date to a UNIX timestamp – Duncan Jones Nov 3 '13 at 20:41
21

Date cannot directly become an integer. Ex:

$ Date.today
=> #<Date: 2017-12-29 ((2458117j,0s,0n),+0s,2299161j)>
$ Date.today.to_i
=> NoMethodError: undefined method 'to_i' for #<Date: 2017-12-29 ((2458117j,0s,0n),+0s,2299161j)>

Your options are either to turn the Date into a time then an Int which will give you the seconds since epoch:

$ Date.today.to_time.to_i
=> 1514523600

Or come up with some other number you want like days since epoch:

$ Date.today.to_time.to_i / (60 * 60 * 24)  ### Number of seconds in a day
=> 17529   ### Number of days since epoch
88
t = Time.now
# => 2010-12-20 11:20:31 -0700

# Seconds since epoch
t.to_i
#=> 1292869231

require 'date'
d = Date.today
#=> #<Date: 2010-12-20 (4911101/2,0,2299161)>

epoch = Date.new(1970,1,1)
#=> #<Date: 1970-01-01 (4881175/2,0,2299161)>

d - epoch
#=> (14963/1)

# Days since epoch
(d - epoch).to_i
#=> 14963

# Seconds since epoch
d.to_time.to_i
#=> 1292828400
9

Time.now.to_i

seconds since epoch format

  • I'm starting with a date object not a time object – Brig Dec 20 '10 at 19:14
  • 4
    You can convert a Date object to a Time object using my_date.to_time – Phrogz Jan 13 '12 at 23:08
  • 10
    Be warned that to_time will use the system time zone, so you probably want to be explicit: my_date.to_time(:utc).to_i. – dukedave Oct 31 '12 at 19:23
5

Solution for Ruby 1.8 when you have an arbitrary DateTime object:

1.8.7-p374 :001 > require 'date'
 => true 
1.8.7-p374 :002 > DateTime.new(2012, 1, 15).strftime('%s')
 => "1326585600"
  • Token +1, but you know, Ruby 1.8 will soon be dead. – Boris Stitnicky Nov 3 '13 at 15:53
  • 1
    As long as there are still 1.8 applications that do their job I'm not convinced :) – Nowaker Nov 3 '13 at 17:43

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