5

I have a dataframe like this

import pandas as pd

df = pd.DataFrame({'a': ['abc', 'r00001', 'r00010', 'rfoo', 'r01234', 'r1234'], 'b': range(6)})

        a  b
0     abc  0
1  r00001  1
2  r00010  2
3    rfoo  3
4  r01234  4
5   r1234  5

I now want to select all columns of this dataframe where the entries in column a start with r followed by five numbers.

From here I learned how one would do this if it started just with r without the numbers:

print df.loc[df['a'].str.startswith('r'), :]

        a  b
1  r00001  1
2  r00010  2
3    rfoo  3
4  r01234  4
5   r1234  5

Something like this

print df.loc[df['a'].str.startswith(r'[r]\d{5}'), :]

does of course not work. How would one do this properly?

6

Option 1
pd.Series.str.match

df.a.str.match('^r\d{5}$')

1     True
2     True
3    False
4     True
5    False
Name: a, dtype: bool

Use it as a filter

df[df.a.str.match('^r\d{5}$')]

        a  b
1  r00001  1
2  r00010  2
4  r01234  4

Option 2
Custom list comprehension using string methods

f = lambda s: s.startswith('r') and (len(s) == 6) and s[1:].isdigit()
[f(s) for s in df.a.values.tolist()]

[False, True, True, False, True, False]

Use it as a filter

df[[f(s) for s in df.a.values.tolist()]]

        a  b
1  r00001  1
2  r00010  2
4  r01234  4

Timing

df = pd.concat([df] * 10000, ignore_index=True)

%timeit df[[s.startswith('r') and (len(s) == 6) and s[1:].isdigit() for s in df.a.values.tolist()]]
%timeit df[df.a.str.match('^r\d{5}$')]
%timeit df[df.a.str.contains('^r\d{5}$')]

10 loops, best of 3: 22.8 ms per loop
10 loops, best of 3: 33.8 ms per loop
10 loops, best of 3: 34.8 ms per loop
3
  • 2
    As str.match is using re.match the pattern could be changed to 'r\d{5}' as by default it matches from the beginning of the string – EdChum Jul 6 '17 at 15:35
  • 2
    I find it depressing to see list comprehension outperforming the supposed vectorised pandas methods, useful to add the timings – EdChum Jul 6 '17 at 15:49
  • @EdChum Agreed! I know the devs have a lot to do. And I keep telling myself that when I can clear my schedule a bit, I'll start contributing to pandas... I still expect that I will at some point. – piRSquared Jul 6 '17 at 15:53
5

You can use str.contains and pass a regex pattern:

In[112]:
df.loc[df['a'].str.contains(r'^r\d{5}')]

Out[112]: 
        a  b
1  r00001  1
2  r00010  2
4  r01234  4

Here the pattern evaluates to ^r - start with character r, and then \d{5} looks for 5 digits

startswith looks for a character pattern, not a regex pattern which is why it fails

Regarding the difference between str.contains and str.match, they are analagous but str.contains uses re.search whilst str.match uses re.match which is more strict, see the docs.

edit

To answer your comment add $ so that it matches a specific number of characters, see related:

In[117]:
df = pd.DataFrame({'a': ['abc', 'r000010', 'r00010', 'rfoo', 'r01234', 'r1234'], 'b': range(6)})
df

Out[117]: 
         a  b
0      abc  0
1  r000010  1
2   r00010  2
3     rfoo  3
4   r01234  4
5    r1234  5


In[118]:
df.loc[df['a'].str.match(r'r\d{5}$')]

Out[118]: 
        a  b
2  r00010  2
4  r01234  4
9
  • Not part of the original post, but how would one now exclude the ones that have more than 5 numbers (or any other characters)? – Cleb Jul 6 '17 at 15:40
  • 1
    r'^r\d{5}$ should handle this – EdChum Jul 6 '17 at 15:41
  • Great, thanks, unfortunately, I cannot upvote twice. I accept the other answer as he was slightly faster but thanks for the detailed explanations. – Cleb Jul 6 '17 at 15:44
  • 1
    Not an issue, glad I can help and add some explanations that are useful – EdChum Jul 6 '17 at 15:44
  • 1
    @Cleb 1 I don't mean to speak for EdChum, but I'm fairly confident that he'd share my sentiment. And that sentiment is, I know very well that his answer is every bit as good as mine and that you can only pick one... I'm ok with the outcome either way. 2 I've added timings to my post, I have zero expectations that match would work any faster that contains. My timings validate that. – piRSquared Jul 6 '17 at 15:51

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