6

Is there way to catch the event of calling an instance of a Perl class?

my $obj = ExampleClass->new();
$obj(); # do something without producing error

I would like to be able to handle this from within the class/module definition. Something similar to the __call__ method in Python, or the __call metamethod in Lua.

  • 1
    What do you mean by "calling an instance"? Note that $obj() is a syntax error in Perl. – choroba Jul 6 '17 at 18:33
  • The phrase "instance of class" usually means an "object." But one cannot "call it," you generally use it to call methods that are defined in your class. This does not raise an "event" (no notification is sent anywhere). If you mean to make things happen when objects are used, you can do that, but it matters what exactly you mean and want to do. Please clarify the question, explain it better. – zdim Jul 6 '17 at 18:46
  • Something like the __call__ function in Python, or the __call metamethod in Lua. – user8201141 Jul 6 '17 at 18:46
9

I'm still not sure what the use case is, but you can overload the class to handle code dereferencing.

package ExampleClass;
use overload '&{}' => \&__call__;   # Or an anon sub.
sub new {
   bless {@_}, shift;
}
sub __call__ {
    sub { warn "calling an instance event" };
}

package main;
my $obj = ExampleClass->new;
$obj->();
&$obj();      # same as $obj->()

Typical output:

$ perl 44956235.pl
calling an instance event at 44956235.pl line 7.
calling an instance event at 44956235.pl line 7.
  • I'm getting an error: Overloading the dereference did not return a reference when using this (after entering the __call__ function). Any ideas why? – aoiee Jul 28 '17 at 15:35
  • 1
    The overloading dereference function is supposed to return a reference of the appropriate type. I've updated my answer. – mob Jul 28 '17 at 16:23
8

Overloading "&{}" is obviously the way to go, but you could base your object on a sub instead of the commonly-preferred hash.

ExampleClass.pm:

package ExampleClass;

use strict;
use warnings;
use feature qw( current_sub say );

my %objects;

sub new {
   my $class = shift;
   my $dummy;  # Force each evaluation of sub{} to return a new variable.
   my $self = bless(sub { $dummy if 0; __SUB__ ->__call__(@_) }, $class) }, $class);
   my $inner = $objects{$self} = {};
   return $self;
}

sub DESTROY {
   my $self = shift;
   delete($objects{$self});
}

sub __call__ {
   my $inner = $objects{ my $self = shift };
   say "__call__(".join(", ", @_).")";
}

sub some_attribute {
   my $inner = $objects{ my $self = shift };
   if (@_) { $inner->{some_attribute} = $_[0]; }
   return $inner->{some_attribute};
}

1;

The main program:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use feature qw( say );

use ExampleClass qw( );

{
   my $obj = ExampleClass->new();

   $obj->some_attribute("value");
   say $obj->some_attribute();

   $obj->(qw( a b c ));
}

{
   my $obj1 = ExampleClass->new();
   $obj1->some_attribute("value1");

   my $obj2 = ExampleClass->new();
   $obj2->some_attribute("value2");

   say $obj1->some_attribute();
   say $obj2->some_attribute();
}

Output:

value
__call__(a, b, c)
value1
value2

This is basically what's called an "inside-out" object.

  • This is just fascinating. – zdim Jul 6 '17 at 22:21
  • @zdim, One could use PadWalker to access $dummy and store the guts in there instead of global hash :) – ikegami Jul 6 '17 at 22:30
2

What you're looking for is called a functor. You can create a base class to implement your functors more easily. For instance:

package AbstractFunctorObject;
use strict;
use warnings;
use overload '&{}' => sub { $_[0]->can( '__invoke' ) };

sub new
{
  my $class = shift;
  bless { @_ }, $class;
}

1;
__END__

Then, you can implement your functors as follows:

package FunctorObject;
use strict;
use warnings;
use parent 'AbstractFunctorObject';

sub __invoke
{
  print "Called as a functor with args: @{ [ @_ ? @_ : 'no argument given' ] }\n";
}

1;
__END__

And finally, you can call the functor as follows:

package main;
use FunctorObject;

my $functor = FunctorObject->new();
$functor->('firstname', 'lastname');
$functor->();

Result will be:

root@jessie:/usr/local/src# perl callable_object.pl 
Called as a functor with args: firstname lastname
Called as a functor with args: no argument given

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