10

I am having this very strange issue. I am creating animated gifs from UIImages and most of the time they come out correct. However when I start to get into larger size images my colors start to disappear. For example if I do a 4 frame 32 x 32 pixel image with no more than 10 colors no issue. If I scale the same image up to 832 x 832 I lose a pink color and my brown turns green.

@1x 32 x 32

enter image description here

@10x 320 x 320

enter image description here

@26x 832 x 832

enter image description here

Here is the code I use to create the gif...

var kFrameCount = 0

for smdLayer in drawingToUse!.layers{
    if !smdLayer.hidden {
        kFrameCount += 1
    }
}

let loopingProperty = [String(kCGImagePropertyGIFLoopCount): 0]
let fileProperties: [String: AnyObject] = [String(kCGImagePropertyGIFDictionary): loopingProperty as AnyObject];

let frameProperty = [String(kCGImagePropertyGIFDelayTime):  Float(speedLabel.text!)!]
let frameProperties: [String: AnyObject] = [String(kCGImagePropertyGIFDictionary): frameProperty as AnyObject];

let documentsDirectoryPath = "file://\(NSTemporaryDirectory())"

if let documentsDirectoryURL = URL(string: documentsDirectoryPath){

    let fileURL = documentsDirectoryURL.appendingPathComponent("\(drawing.name)\(getScaleString()).gif")
    let destination = CGImageDestinationCreateWithURL(fileURL as CFURL, kUTTypeGIF, kFrameCount, nil)!

    CGImageDestinationSetProperties(destination, fileProperties as CFDictionary);

    for smdLayer in drawingToUse!.layers{

        if !smdLayer.hidden{

            let image = UIImage(smdLayer: smdLayer, alphaBlend: useAlphaLayers, backgroundColor: backgroundColorButton.backgroundColor!, scale: scale)
            CGImageDestinationAddImage(destination, image.cgImage!, frameProperties as CFDictionary)
        }
    }

    if (!CGImageDestinationFinalize(destination)) {
        print("failed to finalize image destination")
    }        
}

I have put in a break point right before I call CGImageDestinationAddImage(destination, image.cgImage!, frameProperties as CFDictionary) and the image is perfectly fine with the correct colors. I hope someone out there knows what I am missing.

Update

Here is a sample project. Note that although it isn't animated in the preview it is saving an animated gif and I log out the location of the image in the console.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/pb52awaj8w3amyz/gifTest.zip?dl=0

6
  • Is the issue only occurring with retina devices or non-retina devices as well? My best guess would be that it has something to do with the image size not being able to cope with higher resolutions. Have you tried creating a larger sized image and then scaling it down instead of the other way around? – Malik Jul 7 '17 at 0:40
  • @Malik I am creating these images from scratch using UnsafeMutablePointer and a context. To answer the question it happens on retina devices no clue on non retina as I don't have one to test on. As far as scaling up or down it isn't actually scaling per say. I am creating a new image from scratch and repeating pixels. – Skyler Lauren Jul 7 '17 at 1:43
  • When you breakpoint and the image looks fine, are you looking at the UIImage or the CGImage? – Ben Kane Jul 7 '17 at 13:22
  • @BenKane UIImage but I did also try going UIImage to CGImage back to UIImage and viewed that and it looked correct. – Skyler Lauren Jul 7 '17 at 13:29
  • I'm guessing UIImage handles it fine, but when you use the CGImage in your graphics context something gets messed up. It makes sense that you could go back and forth and still see a valid UIImage since the data isn't changing. Not sure what it would be offhand. Maybe you need to do something like set kCGImageDestinationLossyCompressionQuality to 1.0 (lossless compression when saving the file) on your destination properties? Or there are other things about the destination you might need to configure. – Ben Kane Jul 7 '17 at 13:44
7
+500

It seems that turning off the global color map fixes the problem:

let loopingProperty: [String: AnyObject] = [
    kCGImagePropertyGIFLoopCount as String: 0 as NSNumber,
    kCGImagePropertyGIFHasGlobalColorMap as String: false as NSNumber
]

Note that unlike PNGs, GIFs can use only a 256 color map, without transparency. For animated GIFs there can be either a global or a per-frame color map.

Unfortunately, Core Graphics does not allow us to work with color maps directly, therefore there is some automatic color conversion when the GIF is encoded.

It seems that turning off the global color map is all what is needed. Also setting up color map explicitly for every frame using kCGImagePropertyGIFImageColorMap would probably work too.

Since this seems not to work reliably, let's create our own color map for every frame:

struct Color : Hashable {
    let red: UInt8
    let green: UInt8
    let blue: UInt8

    var hashValue: Int {
        return Int(red) + Int(green) + Int(blue)
    }

    public static func ==(lhs: Color, rhs: Color) -> Bool {
        return [lhs.red, lhs.green, lhs.blue] == [rhs.red, rhs.green, rhs.blue]
    }
}

struct ColorMap {
    var colors = Set<Color>()

    var exported: Data {
        let data = Array(colors)
            .map { [$0.red, $0.green, $0.blue] }
            .joined()

        return Data(bytes: Array(data))
    }
}

Now let's update our methods:

func getScaledImages(_ scale: Int) -> [(CGImage, ColorMap)] {
    var sourceImages = [UIImage]()
    var result: [(CGImage, ColorMap)] = []

...

    var colorMap = ColorMap()
    let pixelData = imageRef.dataProvider!.data
    let rawData: UnsafePointer<UInt8> = CFDataGetBytePtr(pixelData)

    for y in 0 ..< imageRef.height{
        for _ in 0 ..< scale {
            for x in 0 ..< imageRef.width{
                 let offset = y * imageRef.width * 4 + x * 4

                 let color = Color(red: rawData[offset], green: rawData[offset + 1], blue: rawData[offset + 2])
                 colorMap.colors.insert(color)

                 for _ in 0 ..< scale {
                     pixelPointer[byteIndex] = rawData[offset]
                     pixelPointer[byteIndex+1] = rawData[offset+1]
                     pixelPointer[byteIndex+2] = rawData[offset+2]
                     pixelPointer[byteIndex+3] = rawData[offset+3]

                     byteIndex += 4
                }
            }
        }
    }

    let cgImage = context.makeImage()!
    result.append((cgImage, colorMap))

and

func createAnimatedGifFromImages(_ images: [(CGImage, ColorMap)]) -> URL {

...

    for (image, colorMap) in images {
        let frameProperties: [String: AnyObject] = [
            String(kCGImagePropertyGIFDelayTime): 0.2 as NSNumber,
            String(kCGImagePropertyGIFImageColorMap): colorMap.exported as NSData
        ]

        let properties: [String: AnyObject] = [
            String(kCGImagePropertyGIFDictionary): frameProperties as AnyObject
        ];

        CGImageDestinationAddImage(destination, image, properties as CFDictionary);
    }

Of course, this will work only if the number of colors is less than 256. I would really recommend a custom GIF library that can handle the color conversion correctly.

19
  • This is correct, it solves the problem. FYI however setting explicit per-frame color maps does not appear to be supported by ImageIO. I tried and it made no difference. It seems that when passing in UIImage as sources, it will always auto-quantize the colours in all the frames into a single colour palette (max of 256 colours, or 255 + transparent colour). It seems turning off the global colour map like this forces it to quantize each image frame individually, working around whatever CoreGraphics bug/glitch this is with the larger images. – Marc Palmer Jul 9 '17 at 12:17
  • For smarter colour quantization handling you'll need to look at quantising your source images first, using whatever logic it is that makes sense for you. Side note: presumably this is just test code issues but those triple-nested loops to fill/clear images are a very undesirable way to do it. Array fills FTW! – Marc Palmer Jul 9 '17 at 12:20
  • @MarcPalmer Yes, the code far from being optimal. I would probably choose an external GIF encoding library instead. Core Graphics are clearly not designed to work with GIFs. – Sulthan Jul 9 '17 at 12:21
  • This does get closer to solving the issue but if you change the scale to 50 the pink still goes missing. – Skyler Lauren Jul 9 '17 at 12:26
  • 1
    @Knight0fDragon Well, do you understand the concept of hash functions? Even if I returned the same constant number for all the colors, duplicates would still get removed. – Sulthan Jul 9 '17 at 14:05
2

Following on, here's some more background on the quantisation fail that is occurring. If you run the GIF output through imagemagick to extract the colour palettes for the version with a global colour map vs. a per-frame colour map, there is some insight into the root of the problem:

The version with GLOBAL colour map: $ convert test.gif -format %c -depth 8 histogram:info:- 28392: ( 0, 0, 0,255) #000000FF black 240656: ( 71,162, 58,255) #47A23AFF srgba(71,162,58,1) 422500: (147,221,253,255) #93DDFDFF srgba(147,221,253,1) 676: (255,255,255,255) #FFFFFFFF white 2704: ( 71,162, 58,255) #47A23AFF srgba(71,162,58,1) 676: (147,221,253,255) #93DDFDFF srgba(147,221,253,1) 2704: ( 71,162, 58,255) #47A23AFF srgba(71,162,58,1) 676: (147,221,253,255) #93DDFDFF srgba(147,221,253,1) 2704: ( 71,162, 58,255) #47A23AFF srgba(71,162,58,1) 676: (147,221,253,255) #93DDFDFF srgba(147,221,253,1)

The version with per-frame colour maps: $ convert test.gif -format %c -depth 8 histogram:info:- 28392: ( 0, 0, 0,255) #000000FF black 237952: ( 71,163, 59,255) #47A33BFF srgba(71,163,59,1) 2704: (113, 78, 0,255) #714E00FF srgba(113,78,0,1) 421824: (147,221,253,255) #93DDFDFF srgba(147,221,253,1) 676: (246, 81,249,255) #F651F9FF srgba(246,81,249,1) 676: (255,255,255,255) #FFFFFFFF white 28392: ( 0, 0, 0,255) #000000FF black 237952: ( 71,163, 59,255) #47A33BFF srgba(71,163,59,1) 2704: (113, 78, 0,255) #714E00FF srgba(113,78,0,1) 421824: (147,221,253,255) #93DDFDFF srgba(147,221,253,1) 676: (246, 81,249,255) #F651F9FF srgba(246,81,249,1) 676: (255,255,255,255) #FFFFFFFF white 28392: ( 0, 0, 0,255) #000000FF black 237952: ( 71,163, 59,255) #47A33BFF srgba(71,163,59,1) 2704: (113, 78, 0,255) #714E00FF srgba(113,78,0,1) 421824: (147,221,253,255) #93DDFDFF srgba(147,221,253,1) 676: (246, 81,249,255) #F651F9FF srgba(246,81,249,1) 676: (255,255,255,255) #FFFFFFFF white 28392: ( 0, 0, 0,255) #000000FF black 237952: ( 71,163, 59,255) #47A33BFF srgba(71,163,59,1) 2704: (113, 78, 0,255) #714E00FF srgba(113,78,0,1) 421824: (147,221,253,255) #93DDFDFF srgba(147,221,253,1) 676: (246, 81,249,255) #F651F9FF srgba(246,81,249,1) 676: (255,255,255,255) #FFFFFFFF white

So the first one is missing the brown and pink, the colours with 246 and 113 in the red channel are not listed at all, and these are listed correctly in the histogram (presumably repeated for every frame in the longer output) for the per-frame colour map version.

This is proof that the palette is generated incorrectly in the GIF, which is what we see easily with our eyes. However, what makes me wonder is that the global colour map version has duplicate entries for several colours. This points at a pretty clear bug in palette quantisation in ImageIO. There should be no duplicate entries in a limited colour palette.

In short: do not rely on Core Graphics to quantise your 24-bit RGB images. Pre-quantise them in advance before sending them to ImageIO and turn off global colour maps. If the problem still manifests then, ImageIO palette writing is broken and you should use a different GIF output library

4
  • Thank you for looking into this but I am lost by "In short: do not rely on Core Graphics to quantise your 24-bit RGB images. Pre-quantise them in advance before sending them to ImageIO and turn off global colour maps." Creating an array of colors used isn't an issue if that is needed but I am at a loss on what exactly you mean or how to do it with ImageIO. – Skyler Lauren Jul 9 '17 at 13:10
  • See @Sulthan's answer. That is what I mean. Putting together your own colour map, but before you do that, make sure all the UIImage(s) have palettes < 256 colours and you have applied appropriate logic for your app to reduce the colours if greater. – Marc Palmer Jul 9 '17 at 13:14
  • Added comment to his answer as to why that isn't an issue. Thanks again for your help. – Skyler Lauren Jul 9 '17 at 13:43
  • Thanks again for your help. I had to create a new question as the accepted answer is no longer valid for iOS 11 if you have time to take a look that would be awesome stackoverflow.com/questions/46391686/… – Skyler Lauren Sep 24 '17 at 15:27

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