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In a CSS sheet, I created a new tag

gb {
    color: green;
}

and in the HTML code, I would replace without javascript, all occurences of

<gb> &#9632; </gb>  <!-- green bullet -->

with something like <gb /> . (Like using the C preprocessor, but doing thing in native HTML/CSS, without need to another program (cpp) and action (preprocessing) before sending the page on the web)

In other terms, how could I create custom HTML tag, with content (saving typing the &#9632; code), but only using HTML/CSS ?

And, yes, a lot of content already address custom HTML tags, but

  1. They generally use Javascript
  2. It is not clear
  3. I can't believe such a little thing could involve these cumbersome solutions.

The idea is just to have a short way to draw an Unicode symbol (and in color) in middle of text.

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  • 4
    It does not really matter whether you “can believe it” or not ... that doesn’t change the basic fact that this is not possible in any trivial way using HTML & CSS alone.
    – CBroe
    Commented Jul 7, 2017 at 10:15
  • 3
    HTML does not allow you to create custom elements (there is a custom element spec, but it is still a draft and your code doesn't conform to it)
    – Quentin
    Commented Jul 7, 2017 at 10:16
  • 1
    Basically you can write <gb> tag to HTML and it will act as normal <div>.
    – Justinas
    Commented Jul 7, 2017 at 10:17
  • 2
    Why you should not be doing that in the first place (especially if you don’t want to use any JavaScript), Quentin has already pointed out in comments. CSS generated content is a “feature” of CSS, yes. But is has no connection whatsoever with custom elements. This would work the same way if you applied it to a div for example.
    – CBroe
    Commented Jul 7, 2017 at 10:40
  • 2
    Why this question and answer are being downvoted? OP asked for a way to not duplicate symbols inside custom tags. Answer has been added. It's working and fits question. What's wrong? Commented Jul 7, 2017 at 10:50

2 Answers 2

2

Option 1

You can (but you should not) create your own HTML tag:

gb::before {
  content: "\25A0";
  color: green;
}
<gb>Your text</gb>

Option 2

You can use a list with <ul> an <li> tags:

ul {
  list-style: none;
  padding-left: 0px;
}

li:before {
  content: "\25A0";
  color: green;
  padding-right:5px;
}
<ul>
  <li>Line 1</li>
  <li>Line 2</li>
  <li>Line 3</li>
</ul>

Option 3

You can use a <span> tag :

.gb::before {
  content: "\25A0";
  color: green;
  padding-right:5px;
}
<span class="gb">Your text</span>

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  • 2
    Good! It almost worked! Not with just <gb/> (putted all the text after in green), but with <gb></gb>.
    – yO_
    Commented Jul 7, 2017 at 10:28
  • 2
    @Quentin Don't agree with you. It's valid to create custom HTML tags. Here is related question about this. Commented Jul 7, 2017 at 10:29
  • 2
    @VadimOvchinnikov — The Custom Elements Specification is (a) a draft and (b) doesn't allow gb as a tag name for a custom element. So no, it isn't valid. Also (c) you haven't written the JavaScript (which the OP said they didn't want to use) to register the custom element. They are also not widely supported.
    – Quentin
    Commented Jul 7, 2017 at 10:30
  • 2
    @ValentinGenevrais The question was not for a list... More to put this square symbol in many places...
    – yO_
    Commented Jul 7, 2017 at 10:50
  • 3
    @ValentinGenevrais To be honest I was OK even with first solution. I didn't care about HTML validity. This works in all browsers, why should anybody care? Commented Jul 7, 2017 at 10:52
1

To use a custom tag that is valid regarding the HTML Living Standard, you'll just need to use a hyphen in your tag name.

<g-b>Hello</g-b>

Then you can follow the Valentin's answer "Option 1".

g-b::before {
  content: "\25A0";
  color: green;
}

r-b::before {
  content: "\25A0";
  color: red;
}
<g-b>Text 1</g-b>
<br>
<r-b></r-b>Text 2

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