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I'm trying to create a WhereLike extension to IQueryable but I can't know the type of the property at runtime.

Here is my code:

    public static IQueryable WhereLike(this IQueryable source, string propertyName, string pattern)
    {
        if (source == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("source");
        if (propertyName == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("propertyName");

        var a = Expression.Parameter(typeof(object), "a");
        var prop = Expression.Property(a, propertyName);

        return source.Provider.CreateQuery(
            Expression.Call(
                typeof(SqlMethods), "Like",
                null,
                prop, Expression.Constant(pattern)));
    }

I get the exception: Instance property 'foo' is not defined for type 'System.Object'

Do you know a way to handle property setting without knowing target type at compile time ?

  • doesn't the SQL like operator only work on strings? – Fran Jul 7 '17 at 14:02
  • @Fran Why does that matter? – Servy Jul 7 '17 at 14:04
  • @Servy because if he can't determine the type of the property he could try to use the WhereLike on a property that doesn't support it (DateTime, Double, ....) then he'd get a runtime exception when it happens. Maybe he tries to grab the source ElementType and look for the property type using reflection. – Fran Jul 7 '17 at 14:09
  • @Fran Yes, the code will fail at runtime if the type of the property provided isn't a string. Trying to check it yourself wouldn't really help, as it'd still be failing at runtime. That's simply the nature of having entirely dynamically typed code; bugs in the types of values manifest at runtime, not compile time. – Servy Jul 7 '17 at 14:11
  • @Servy True. I guess I'm trying to trap the error as early as possible. And return a message that this function isn't supported for types other than string. So I just fired up SSMS to run a few like queries. Some Like on datetimes work, but not the way i expected. Like on decimal didn't work. The funny thing is they don't throw syntax errors, they just don't return data. – Fran Jul 7 '17 at 14:20
1

If you are able to use the generic IQueryable<T> variant, this becomes a much easier problem since you no longer need CreateQuery and you can execute directly against the IQueryable<T> source.

public static IQueryable<T> WhereLike<T>(this IQueryable<T> source, string propertyName, 
    string pattern)
{
    if (source == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("source");
    if (propertyName == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("propertyName");

    var a = Expression.Parameter(typeof(T), "a");
    var prop = Expression.PropertyOrField(a, propertyName);

    var expr = Expression.Call(
            typeof(SqlMethods), "Like",
            null,
            prop, Expression.Constant(pattern));

    var lambda = Expression.Lambda<Func<T, bool>>(expr, a); 
    return source.Where(lambda);
}

Note two key points:

Instead of only grabbing properties, if we use PropertyOrField we can properly support code generated for Linq-2-SQL that may be exposing fields.

In addition, since we are executing against the IQueryable<T> source, we need to create a lambda expression from the results of our "Like" MethodCallExpression.


If you need the non-generic variant, you can still accomplish the same thing, although you'll need to wrap your Like MethodCallExpression in a Where MethodCallExpression in order for it to be properly structured:

public static IQueryable WhereLike(this IQueryable source, string propertyName, 
    string pattern)
{
    if (source == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("source");
    if (propertyName == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("propertyName");

    var a = Expression.Parameter(source.GetType().GetGenericArguments().First(), "a");
    var prop = Expression.PropertyOrField(a, propertyName);

    var expr = Expression.Call(
            typeof(SqlMethods), "Like",
            null,
            prop, Expression.Constant(pattern));

    MethodCallExpression whereCallExpression = Expression.Call(
            typeof(Queryable),
            "Where",
            new Type[] { source.ElementType },
            source.Expression,
            Expression.Lambda(expr, a));

    return source.Provider.CreateQuery(whereCallExpression);
}

You can invoke either variant with wildcards:

var data = source.WhereLike("ColumnName", "%o%");   
| improve this answer | |
-1

Determines whether a specific character string matches a specified pattern. A pattern can include regular characters and wildcard characters. During pattern matching, regular characters must exactly match the characters specified in the character string. However, wildcard characters can be matched with arbitrary fragments of the character string. Using wildcard characters makes the LIKE operator more flexible than using the = and != string comparison operators. If any one of the arguments is not of character string data type, the SQL Server Database Engine converts it to character string data type, if it is possible. MSDN

Like operator will work on string type only. If that's what you wanted to do you can achieve with Contains method only, There are also StartsWith and EndsWith equivalent.

You can use Where method only in this extension method

  var containsParam = Expression.Parameter(typeof(T), "p");
MemberExpression multiSelectmember = Expression.Property(containsParam,propertyname);
    var lstValues = stringvalue;

ConstantExpression multiSelectConstant = Expression.Constant(stringvalue);
var callExpression = Expression.Call(typeof(String), "Contains",
new[] { typeof(string) }, multiSelectConstant, multiSelectmember);
var containsexp = Expression.Lambda<Func<T, bool>>(callExpression,
                                                containsParam);
| improve this answer | |
  • I also tried with StartsWith, EndsWith, etc... but with complex patterns ("%AA_BB%CC%"), this solution seems limited – eli0tt Jul 7 '17 at 14:29

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