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I've trained a gradient boost classifier, and I would like to visualize it using the graphviz_exporter tool shown here.

When I try it I get:

AttributeError: 'GradientBoostingClassifier' object has no attribute 'tree_'

this is because the graphviz_exporter is meant for decision trees, but I guess there's still a way to visualize it, since the gradient boost classifier must have an underlying decision tree.

How to do that?

2
  • 1
    have you tried to use XGBoost link?
    – seralouk
    Jul 7, 2017 at 15:38
  • Thanks for introducing me to the XGBoost library. I'll give it a check, although I found how to do it using sklearn Jul 7, 2017 at 16:08

2 Answers 2

22

The attribute estimators contains the underlying decision trees. The following code displays one of the trees of a trained GradientBoostingClassifier. Notice that although the ensemble is a classifier as a whole, each individual tree computes floating point values.

from sklearn.ensemble import GradientBoostingClassifier
from sklearn.tree import export_graphviz
import numpy as np

# Ficticuous data
np.random.seed(0)
X = np.random.normal(0,1,(1000, 3))
y = X[:,0]+X[:,1]*X[:,2] > 0

# Classifier
clf = GradientBoostingClassifier(max_depth=3, random_state=0)
clf.fit(X[:600], y[:600])

# Get the tree number 42
sub_tree_42 = clf.estimators_[42, 0]

# Visualization
# Install graphviz: https://www.graphviz.org/download/
from pydotplus import graph_from_dot_data
from IPython.display import Image
dot_data = export_graphviz(
    sub_tree_42,
    out_file=None, filled=True, rounded=True,
    special_characters=True,
    proportion=False, impurity=False, # enable them if you want
)
graph = graph_from_dot_data(dot_data)
png = graph.create_png()
# Save (optional)
from pathlib import Path
Path('./out.png').write_bytes(png)
# Display
Image(png)

Tree number 42:

Code output (decision tree image)

10
  • 7
    Yes, but in this case, you have 200 estimators. So its not practical or useful to print out 200 trees to understand it. See this for better understanding. Jul 10, 2017 at 6:41
  • Thank you, that page is really useful for me to understand the whole concept better Jul 11, 2017 at 12:33
  • 1
    Can you add the dependencies to run the answer? Aug 24, 2020 at 18:25
  • 1
    @GonzaloGarcia Done. I also added the image output. Aug 24, 2020 at 23:05
  • 1
    @HoseinBasafa thanks. I added the instructions for saving the image to a file. Feb 27, 2023 at 13:26
2

To add to the existing answer, there is another nice visualization package called dtreeviz which I find really useful.

Borrowing code from the existing answer:

from sklearn.ensemble import GradientBoostingClassifier
import numpy as np
from dtreeviz.trees import *

# Ficticuous data
np.random.seed(0)
X = np.random.normal(0,1,(1000, 3))
y = X[:,0]+X[:,1]*X[:,2] > 0

# Classifier
clf = GradientBoostingClassifier(max_depth=3, random_state=0)
clf.fit(X[:600], y[:600])

# Get the tree number 42
sub_tree_42 = clf.estimators_[42, 0]

# Visualization
viz = dtreeviz(sub_tree_42,
               x_data=X,
               y_data=y,
               target_name='Positive',
               feature_names=['X0', 'X1', 'X2'],
               class_names=['Negative', 'Positive'],
               title='Tree 42 visualization')

viz.save("tree_visualization.svg") 
viz.view()

enter image description here

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