1

I have the following code:

#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>

template <typename T, typename std::enable_if
                                 <std::is_convertible<int, T>::value, T>::type>
void func(T a)
{
    std::cout << a << std::endl;
}

template <typename T, typename std::enable_if
                                 <!std::is_convertible<int, T>::value, T>::type>
void func(T a)
{
    a.print();
}

class Test
{
public:
    void print()
    {
        std::cout << "Test" << std::endl;
    }
};    

int main()
{
    func(3);
    func("Test");
    return 0;
}

With this code, I expected the first call to func to print out 3 (as int is indeed convertible to int, the first specialization should be called) and the second call to func to print out Test (Test() is not convertible to int, so the second specialization should be called). However, I instead get a compiler error:

prog.cpp: In function ‘int main()’:

prog.cpp:27:8: error: no matching function for call to ‘func(int)’

prog.cpp:5:6: note: candidate: template [class T, typename std::enable_if[std::is_convertible[int, T>::value, T>::type > void func(T)

prog.cpp:5:6: note: template argument deduction/substitution failed:

prog.cpp:27:8: note: couldn't deduce template parameter ‘[anonymous>’

If, however, I change the templated functions to instead be (while leaving everything else exactly the same):

template <typename T, typename std::enable_if
                                 <std::is_convertible<int, T>::value, T>::type* =
                                  nullptr>
void func(T a)
{
    std::cout << a << std::endl;
}

template <typename T, typename std::enable_if
                                 <!std::is_convertible<int, T>::value, T>::type* =
                                  nullptr>
void func(T a)
{
    a.print();
}

then everything compiles and works as I expected. What is this extra syntax doing and why do I need it?

6
template<typename T, typename std::enable_if<std::is_convertible<int, T>::value, T>::type>

if we were to remove the noise, would become

template<typename T, typename Something<T>::type>

which is declaring as its second parameter a non-type parameter, the typename here is specifying the nested type is a name of a type. See here for more information.

In the first case, the second parameter is non-type, so the function call func(3) doesn't fit the template which is expecting func<int, some_int>(3).

  • @downvoter kindly explain, I am intrigued as to why this is perceived as downvote worthy – Passer By Jul 7 '17 at 16:06
  • You haven't answered the question. I noted in the question itself that providing a default parameter of nullptr solved the issue - why is the default parameter required? – R_Kapp Jul 7 '17 at 16:08
  • 1
    @R_Kapp I replied with the first three sentences. Everything below is added because I assumed you aren't familiar with SFINAE. – Passer By Jul 7 '17 at 16:10
  • The template parameter would result in a syntax error with or without the default argument correct (if the boolean in std::enable_if is false)? How does adding the default argument change things? – R_Kapp Jul 7 '17 at 16:15
  • 1
    @R_Kapp Because the second parameter is non-type, you'd have to supply it with a value like func<42>(3);, but since it is the second parameter, you'd have to write func<int, 42>(3) – Passer By Jul 7 '17 at 16:22

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