6

What's the standard line to add to the ternary operator in order to do nothing if the condition is not met?

Example:

int a = 0;
a > 10 ? a = 5 : /*do nothing*/;

Using a seems to do the trick, but I am wondering if there is a more generally accepted way.

3
  • 2
    I would just use an if () instead in this case since it improves readability.
    – drescherjm
    Commented Jul 8, 2017 at 16:14
  • 6
    Ternary operator with assignment as side effect? No, please don't.
    – dhke
    Commented Jul 8, 2017 at 16:15
  • 1
    The generally accepted way is to not use the ternary operator for side effects.
    – molbdnilo
    Commented Jul 8, 2017 at 16:58

5 Answers 5

20

That will do it:

a = a > 10 ? 5 : a;

or simply:

if (a > 10) a = 5;
6

Another option:

a ? void(a = 0) : void();

What's good about this one is that it works even if you can't construct an instance of decltype(a = 0) to put into the 'do nothing' expression. (Which doesn't matter for primitive types anyway.)

4

You can also use a logical expression (though maybe confusing) in case you don't want to use an if statement.

a > 10 && a = 5
0

You can do:

a > 10 ? a=5 : 0;

But, I would prefer:

if (a > 10) 
   a = 5;
1
  • I wouldn't do that. For example, with strings this code will crush! std::string s{}; s.empty() ? "some sting" : 0;
    – Alex D
    Commented Mar 27 at 15:45
0

Just for a sake of variety, but not recommending as it is very ambiguous.

void do_smth()
{}

bool a = true; // not necessarily 

a && (do_smth(), 0);

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