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If I want to use isinstance(var, B) in class A's implementation, and use isinstance(var, A) in class B's implementation, how can I import modules properly?

For instance, if I want to implement both a+b and b+a, in which type(a) is A and type(b) is B.

In _A.py:

from mypackage._B import B
from mypackage._C import C

class A:
    def __add__(var):
        if isinstance(var, B):
            # Do something
        elif isinstance(var, C):
            # Do something
        # Do some other things

In _B.py:

from mypackage._A import A
from mypackage._C import C

class B:
    def __add__(var):
        if isinstance(var, A):
            # Do something
        elif isinstance(var, C):
            # Do something
        # Do some other things

In _C.py:

from mypackage._A import A
from mypackage._B import B

class C:
    def __add__(var):
        if isinstance(var, A):
            # Do something
        elif isinstance(var, B):
            # Do something
        # Do some other things

However, cross import is prohibited in Python.

Can I have some other ways to avoid this restriction?

EDIT: Of course, in __init__.py:

from ._A import A
from ._B import B
from ._C import C
  • You can (and probably should) do all the imports inside a top-level __init__.py file. You could also (but probably should not) do the imports inside the classes or methods definitions. – DeepSpace Jul 9 '17 at 14:16
  • @DeepSpace Of course they were imported in __init__.py. But it can still cause error if I don't import B and C in _A.py and so forth. – qrqiuren Jul 9 '17 at 14:42

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