17

Now there are a lot of similar questions but most of them answer how to delete the duplicate columns. However, I want to know how can I make a list of tuples where each tuple contains the column names of duplicate columns. I am assuming that each column has a unique name. Just to further illustrate my question:

df = pd.DataFrame({'A': [1, 2, 3, 4, 5],'B': [2, 4, 2, 1, 9],
                   'C': [1, 2, 3, 4, 5],'D': [2, 4, 2, 1, 9],
                   'E': [3, 4, 2, 1, 2],'F': [1, 1, 1, 1, 1]},
                   index = ['a1', 'a2', 'a3', 'a4', 'a5'])

then I want the output:

[('A', 'C'), ('B', 'D')]

And if you are feeling great today then also extend the same question to rows. How to get a list of tuples where each tuple contains duplicate rows.

4
  • My df in real life is having dim of (8000, 500) so it will be really time taking if I try all the combinations approach. I had one solution but that is only valid for numerical values (but won't work with qualitative variables). So what I thought was to normalize each column and take dot product of df and transposed df. Then gather all the columns which have dot product of "1" and are not on the diagonal of the matrix. Jul 9, 2017 at 16:26
  • 1
    I add numpy tag for numpy solutions - very fast, but a bit complicated.
    – jezrael
    Jul 9, 2017 at 16:55
  • When you say you want an approach that also works for non-numerical values does that include object-dtypes? Or do you mean string-like U, S or B dtypes?
    – MSeifert
    Jul 9, 2017 at 20:24
  • String like column with levels: "aa", "ab", "bc", etc. And I don't want to use encoding for these levels. @MSeifert Jul 9, 2017 at 22:30

7 Answers 7

10

Here's one NumPy approach -

def group_duplicate_cols(df):
    a = df.values
    sidx = np.lexsort(a)
    b = a[:,sidx]

    m = np.concatenate(([False], (b[:,1:] == b[:,:-1]).all(0), [False] ))
    idx = np.flatnonzero(m[1:] != m[:-1])
    C = df.columns[sidx].tolist()
    return [C[i:j] for i,j in zip(idx[::2],idx[1::2]+1)]

Sample runs -

In [100]: df
Out[100]: 
    A  B  C  D  E  F
a1  1  2  1  2  3  1
a2  2  4  2  4  4  1
a3  3  2  3  2  2  1
a4  4  1  4  1  1  1
a5  5  9  5  9  2  1

In [101]: group_duplicate_cols(df)
Out[101]: [['A', 'C'], ['B', 'D']]

# Let's add one more duplicate into group containing 'A'
In [102]: df.F = df.A

In [103]: group_duplicate_cols(df)
Out[103]: [['A', 'C', 'F'], ['B', 'D']]

Converting to do the same, but for rows(index), we just need to switch the operations along the other axis, like so -

def group_duplicate_rows(df):
    a = df.values
    sidx = np.lexsort(a.T)
    b = a[sidx]

    m = np.concatenate(([False], (b[1:] == b[:-1]).all(1), [False] ))
    idx = np.flatnonzero(m[1:] != m[:-1])
    C = df.index[sidx].tolist()
    return [C[i:j] for i,j in zip(idx[::2],idx[1::2]+1)]

Sample run -

In [260]: df2
Out[260]: 
   a1  a2  a3  a4  a5
A   3   5   3   4   5
B   1   1   1   1   1
C   3   5   3   4   5
D   2   9   2   1   9
E   2   2   2   1   2
F   1   1   1   1   1

In [261]: group_duplicate_rows(df2)
Out[261]: [['B', 'F'], ['A', 'C']]

Benchmarking

Approaches -

# @John Galt's soln-1
from itertools import combinations
def combinations_app(df):
    return[x for x in combinations(df.columns, 2) if (df[x[0]] == df[x[-1]]).all()]

# @Abdou's soln
def pandas_groupby_app(df):
    return [tuple(d.index) for _,d in df.T.groupby(list(df.T.columns)) if len(d) > 1]                        

# @COLDSPEED's soln
def triu_app(df):
    c = df.columns.tolist()
    i, j = np.triu_indices(len(c), 1)
    x = [(c[_i], c[_j]) for _i, _j in zip(i, j) if (df[c[_i]] == df[c[_j]]).all()]
    return x

# @cmaher's soln
def lambda_set_app(df):
    return list(filter(lambda x: len(x) > 1, list(set([tuple([x for x in df.columns if all(df[x] == df[y])]) for y in df.columns]))))

Note : @John Galt's soln-2 wasn't included because the inputs being of size (8000,500) would blow up with the proposed broadcasting for that one.

Timings -

In [179]: # Setup inputs with sizes as mentioned in the question
     ...: df = pd.DataFrame(np.random.randint(0,10,(8000,500)))
     ...: df.columns = ['C'+str(i) for i in range(df.shape[1])]
     ...: idx0 = np.random.choice(df.shape[1], df.shape[1]//2,replace=0)
     ...: idx1 = np.random.choice(df.shape[1], df.shape[1]//2,replace=0)
     ...: df.iloc[:,idx0] = df.iloc[:,idx1].values
     ...: 

# @John Galt's soln-1
In [180]: %timeit combinations_app(df)
1 loops, best of 3: 24.6 s per loop

# @Abdou's soln
In [181]: %timeit pandas_groupby_app(df)
1 loops, best of 3: 3.81 s per loop

# @COLDSPEED's soln
In [182]: %timeit triu_app(df)
1 loops, best of 3: 25.5 s per loop

# @cmaher's soln
In [183]: %timeit lambda_set_app(df)
1 loops, best of 3: 27.1 s per loop

# Proposed in this post
In [184]: %timeit group_duplicate_cols(df)
10 loops, best of 3: 188 ms per loop

Super boost with NumPy's view functionality

Leveraging NumPy's view functionality that lets us view each group of elements as one dtype, we could gain further noticeable performance boost, like so -

def view1D(a): # a is array
    a = np.ascontiguousarray(a)
    void_dt = np.dtype((np.void, a.dtype.itemsize * a.shape[1]))
    return a.view(void_dt).ravel()

def group_duplicate_cols_v2(df):
    a = df.values
    sidx = view1D(a.T).argsort()
    b = a[:,sidx]

    m = np.concatenate(([False], (b[:,1:] == b[:,:-1]).all(0), [False] ))
    idx = np.flatnonzero(m[1:] != m[:-1])
    C = df.columns[sidx].tolist()
    return [C[i:j] for i,j in zip(idx[::2],idx[1::2]+1)]

Timings -

In [322]: %timeit group_duplicate_cols(df)
10 loops, best of 3: 185 ms per loop

In [323]: %timeit group_duplicate_cols_v2(df)
10 loops, best of 3: 69.3 ms per loop

Just crazy speedups!

0
7

Here's a single-liner

In [22]: from itertools import combinations

In [23]: [x for x in combinations(df.columns, 2) if (df[x[0]] == df[x[-1]]).all()]
Out[23]: [('A', 'C'), ('B', 'D')]

Alternatively, using NumPy broadcasting. Better, look at Divakar's solution

In [124]: cols = df.columns

In [125]: dftv = df.T.values

In [126]: cross = pd.DataFrame((dftv == dftv[:, None]).all(-1), cols, cols)

In [127]: cross
Out[127]:
       A      B      C      D      E      F
A   True  False   True  False  False  False
B  False   True  False   True  False  False
C   True  False   True  False  False  False
D  False   True  False   True  False  False
E  False  False  False  False   True  False
F  False  False  False  False  False   True

# Only take values from lower triangle
In [128]: s = cross.where(np.tri(*cross.shape, k=-1)).unstack()

In [129]: s[s == 1].index.tolist()
Out[129]: [('A', 'C'), ('B', 'D')]
8
  • Nice oneliner. but using combinations my be costful for large datasets.
    – cgte
    Jul 9, 2017 at 16:16
  • Nice! I have 500 features (500 columns). It will be costly. If you have any faster way then please include that also. Jul 9, 2017 at 16:21
  • @PallavBakshi I don't know the specifics of your dataset but if you are trying to reduce dimension why not just take the correlation? The correlation between A and C will be 1.
    – ayhan
    Jul 9, 2017 at 16:23
  • Why don't you time the solutions provided by everyone to your specific usecase and add the results to the question?
    – Zero
    Jul 9, 2017 at 16:23
  • 1
    @ayhan - I think that is a very standard way of dropping duplicates. However, I want to put them in a list and not drop them. But thanks :D Jul 9, 2017 at 16:34
6

This should also do:

[tuple(d.index) for _,d in df.T.groupby(list(df.T.columns)) if len(d) > 1]

Yields:

# [('A', 'C'), ('B', 'D')]
1
  • 1
    This appears to be the cleanest option.
    – cmaher
    Jul 9, 2017 at 16:32
4

Not using panda, just pure python :

data = {'A': [1, 2, 3, 4, 5],'B': [2, 4, 2, 1, 9],
        'C': [1, 2, 3, 4, 5],'D': [2, 4, 2, 1, 9],
        'E': [3, 4, 2, 1, 2],'F': [1, 1, 1, 1, 1]}
from collections import defaultdict

deduplicate = defaultdict(list)


for key, items in data.items():
    deduplicate[tuple(items)].append(key)  # cast to tuple because they are hashables but lists are not.

duplicates = list()
for vector, letters in deduplicate.items():
    if len(letters) > 1:
        duplicates.append(letters)

print(duplicates)

Using pandas :

import pandas

df = pandas.DataFrame(data)
duplicates = []

dedup2 = defaultdict(list)

for key in df.columns:
    dedup2[tuple(df[key])].append(key)

duplicates = list()
for vector, letters in dedup2.items():
    if len(letters) > 1:
        duplicates.append(letters)

print(duplicates)

Not really nice, but may be quicker since everything is done in one iteration over the data.

dedup2 = defaultdict(list)

duplicates = {}

for key in df.columns:
    astup = tuple(df[key])
    duplic = dedup2[astup] 
    duplic.append(key)
    if len(duplic) > 1:
        duplicates[astup] = duplic

duplicates = duplicates.values()
print(duplicates)
4
  • If you could make it work with dataframe as input, would love to include in my timings test.
    – Divakar
    Jul 9, 2017 at 17:53
  • I do not know panda :/ can you give me links so that it can easily get bootstraped ?
    – cgte
    Jul 9, 2017 at 20:27
  • Not sure what you mean by bootstrapping. If you meant loading the module : import pandas as pd. Then, we need something that would translate df from question into data used in this post. I have very limited knowledge of pandas myself.
    – Divakar
    Jul 9, 2017 at 20:32
  • Hi, i fixed the code to be pandas' dataframe compliant. However it may be quite sub obtimal.
    – cgte
    Jul 9, 2017 at 21:02
2

This is another approach that uses pure Python:

from operator import itemgetter
from itertools import groupby

def myfunc(df):
    # Convert the dataframe to a list of list including the column name
    zipped = zip(df.columns, df.values.T.tolist())
    # Sort the columns (so they can be grouped)
    zipped_sorted = sorted(zipped, key=itemgetter(1))
    # Placeholder for the result
    res = []
    res_append = res.append
    # Find duplicated columns using itertools.groupby
    for k, grp in groupby(zipped_sorted, itemgetter(1)):
        grp = list(grp)
        if len(grp) > 1:
            res_append(tuple(map(itemgetter(0), grp)))
    return res

I included some inline comments that illustrate how it works, but basically this just sorts the input so identical columns are adjacent and then it groups them.

I did some superficial timings using Divakars timing setup and got the following:

%timeit group_duplicate_cols(df)
391 ms ± 25.8 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1 loop each)
%timeit myfunc(df)
572 ms ± 4.36 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1 loop each)

So it seems like only 2 times slower than a NumPy approach, which is actually amazing.

1

Based on @John Galt one liner which is like this:

result_col = [x for x in combinations(df.columns, 2) if (df[x[0]] == df[x[-1]]).all()]

you can get the result_row as follows:

result_row = [x for x in combinations(df.T.columns,2) if (df.T[x[0]] == df.T[x[-1]]).all()]

using transpose (df.T)

0

Here's one more option using only comprehensions/built-ins:

filter(lambda x: len(x) > 1, list(set([tuple([x for x in df.columns if all(df[x] == df[y])]) for y in df.columns])))

Result:

[('A', 'C'), ('B', 'D')]

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