120

Everything works fine, but I have this warning Expected to return a value at the end of arrow function array-callback-return. I tried using forEach instead of map, but then <CommentItem /> doesn't even show. How do I fix this?

  return this.props.comments.map((comment) => {
  
      if (comment.hasComments === true) {
      
        return (
          <div key={comment.id}>
          
            <CommentItem className="MainComment"/>

              {this.props.comments.map(commentReply => {
              
                if (commentReply.replyTo === comment.id) { 
                  return (
                    <CommentItem className="SubComment"/>
                 ) // return
                } // if-statement
              }) // map-function
              } // map-function __begin
            
          </div> // comment.id
          
        ) // return

4
  • 1
    Is there another return if you do not go into the if? Jul 10, 2017 at 14:03
  • 26
    You only return if commentReply.replyTo === comment.id. If that's not the case, you don't return anything. Just put return null after the if block
    – Lennholm
    Jul 10, 2017 at 14:04
  • Mikael Lennholm, may i say, you are genius Jul 10, 2017 at 14:11
  • @RamzanChasygov some languages don't allow single-branch if statements because they lead to problems like this. You'd be doing yourself a favor if you always, always write the else branch of any if statement – if represents a fork in your code, so you need to tell the program what happens on each path; not just one.
    – Mulan
    Jul 10, 2017 at 14:40

7 Answers 7

210

A map() creates an array, so a return is expected for all code paths (if/elses).

If you don't want an array or to return data, use forEach instead.

1
  • 20
    This is a short and general solution. Hope this goes to the first spot
    – EduLopez
    Jul 30, 2018 at 18:33
120

The warning indicates that you're not returning something at the end of your map arrow function in every case.

A better approach to what you're trying to accomplish is first using a .filter and then a .map, like this:

this.props.comments
  .filter(commentReply => commentReply.replyTo === comment.id)
  .map((commentReply, idx) => <CommentItem key={idx} className="SubComment"/>);
3
  • What if no match found to filter
    – CyberAbhay
    Mar 14, 2019 at 11:25
  • 4
    If no comments matches the filter, an empty array will be returned. That will be passed to .map, which in turn will be a no-op. In other words - if there's no match, nothing will be rendered. Mar 17, 2019 at 11:43
  • As Zanon suggested below, an easier and less complex option is to simply use forEach that doesn't expect to return anything instead of map that do expect to return something. Jul 28, 2020 at 15:05
36

The easiest way only if you don't need return something it'ts just return null

2
  • Just use forEach in that case as suggested by @Zanon
    – Shivam Jha
    Oct 20, 2020 at 8:52
  • A good option for lists of React components, where it's better for reconciliation to see a consistent number of elements with some nulls than an entirely different list.
    – Noumenon
    Dec 2, 2022 at 9:20
10

The problem seems to be that you are not returning something in the event that your first if-case is false.

The error you are getting states that your arrow function (comment) => { doesn't have a return statement. While it does for when your if-case is true, it does not return anything for when it's false.

return this.props.comments.map((comment) => {
  if (comment.hasComments === true) {
    return (
      <div key={comment.id}>
        <CommentItem className="MainComment" />
        {this.props.comments.map(commentReply => {
          if (commentReply.replyTo === comment.id) { 
            return (
              <CommentItem className="SubComment"/>
            )
          }
        })
        }
      </div>
    )
  } else {
     //return something here.
  }
});

edit you should take a look at Kris' answer for how to better implement what you are trying to do.

6

The most upvoted answer, from Kris Selbekk, it is totally right. It is important to highlight though that it takes a functional approach, you will be looping through the this.props.comments array twice, the second time(looping) it will most probable skip a few elements that where filtered, but in case no comment was filtered you will loop through the whole array twice. If performance is not a concern in you project that is totally fine. In case performance is important a guard clause would be more appropriated as you would loop the array only once:

return this.props.comments.map((comment) => {
  if (!comment.hasComments) return null; 

  return (
    <div key={comment.id}>         
      <CommentItem className="MainComment"/>
        {this.props.comments.map(commentReply => {             
          if (commentReply.replyTo !== comment.id) return null;

          return <CommentItem className="SubComment"/>
        })} 
    </div>          
  ) 
}

The main reason I'm pointing this out is because as a Junior Developer I did a lot of those mistakes(like looping the same array multiple times), so I thought i was worth mention it here.

PS: I would refactor your react component even more, as I'm not in favour of heavy logic in the html part of a JSX, but that is out of the topic of this question.

0

You can use the for loop like so:

for(let i = 0 ; i < comments.length; i++){
 if(comments[i].hasComments === true){
return (
       <div key={comments[i].id}>
        //content Here
      </div> // comment.id
        )
      }
     }
-2

class Blog extends Component{
	render(){
		const posts1 = this.props.posts;
		//console.log(posts)
		const sidebar = (
			<ul>
				{posts1.map((post) => {
					//Must use return to avoid this error.
          return(
						<li key={post.id}>
							{post.title} - {post.content}
						</li>
					)
				})
			}
			
			</ul>
		);
		const maincontent = this.props.posts.map((post) => {
			return(
				<div key={post.id}>
					<h3>{post.title}</h3>
					<p>{post.content}</p>
				</div>
			)
		})
		return(
			<div>{sidebar}<hr/>{maincontent}</div>
		);
	}
}
const posts = [
  {id: 1, title: 'Hello World', content: 'Welcome to learning React!'},
  {id: 2, title: 'Installation', content: 'You can install React from npm.'}
];

ReactDOM.render(
  <Blog posts={posts} />,
  document.getElementById('root')
);

1
  • Could you add some explanation how does your code solve OP's issue?
    – barbsan
    Feb 21, 2019 at 12:19

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.