Recently on CodeReview.SE, I came across an answer which talks about a technique called “exception vomiting”. Apparently this trick is used to exploit that exceptions have to be implemented in a thread-safe manner independent of whether the compiler supports thread_local variables.

I paste part of this answer below:

There's an existing technique which is not dissimilar referred to as "exception vomiting". Observe:

void f(void(*p)()) {
    p();
}
template<typename F> void real_f(F func) {
    try {
        throw func;
    } catch(...) {
        f([] {
            try {
                throw;
            } catch(F func) {
                func();
            }
        });
    }
}

This abuses the fact that the compiler must provide a thread-local stack for complex objects for use as exception storage, regardless of their support for other thread local features, and therefore enjoys much broad compiler support. The most obvious drawbacks are a) it's horrible, and b) it's limited to stack semantics.

My question is, how does that trick actually work and is it “safe”?

  • 2
    The catch by value concerns me a bit, or is this whole thing above my pay grade? – Bathsheba Jul 11 '17 at 9:23
  • @Bathsheba It is not my code and I have no idea how it works. That's why I'm asking here ;) – Henri Menke Jul 11 '17 at 9:24
  • I appreciate that; my comment is more directed at folk capable of tackling this question - I am not one of them. – Bathsheba Jul 11 '17 at 9:25
  • Just my $.02, but my understanding was that the C++ standard didn't directly acknowledge the existence of threads or make any reference to thread-safety until C++11, when the thread_local keyword was introduced. I would have thought, therefore, that assuming this technique works, it would only be useful in a very minimal number of compilers? – Thomas Russell Jul 11 '17 at 9:36
  • 3
    The codereview says "It can be used to supply a capturing lambda as a C callback:" ...then follows some code... and the code here is the answer saying "This abuses the fact that the compiler must provide a thread-local stack for complex objects for use as exception storage, regardless of their support for other thread local features, and therefore enjoys much broad compiler support. The most obvious drawbacks are a) it's horrible, and b) it's limited to stack semantics." Imho the question here would be more clear if it included such background information – user463035818 Jul 11 '17 at 9:46
up vote 5 down vote accepted

This technique relies on the fact that exceptions must be implemented in a thread-safe manner in order for exceptions to be usable in a multi-threaded application. Even pre C++-11 compilers supported thread safe exceptions before threads became a part of the C++ standard.

Each thread throw/catch exceptions independently of other threads by using thread-specific storage for storing exceptions. throw without an argument rethrows the current exception stored in that thread-specific storage. This storage for the exception is used to store the function with its captured arguments (stateful lambda or any other callable).

The drawback of this technique is that throwing an exception normally involves a memory allocation, so it adds the overhead of new/delete invocations.


Another way to implement this is to use a non-portable but widely supported __thread storage specifier. This avoid the overhead of dynamic memory allocation:

void f(void(*p)()) { // The C-style function.
    p();
}

__thread void(*function)();

template<class Function>
void adapter() {
    (*reinterpret_cast<Function*>(function))();
}

template<typename F>
void invoke_f(F const& func) {
    function = reinterpret_cast<void(*)()>(&func);
    f(adapter<F const>);
}

int main(int ac, char**) {
    invoke_f([ac]{ std::cout << ac << '\n'; });
}

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