61

How do I check a string to make sure it contains numbers, letters, or space only?

1
  • If you write an extension method for strings, the check can be built in. You could also use one that's already written such as the Extensions.cs NuGet package that makes it as simple as: For example: "abcXYZ123".IsAlphaNumeric() will return True whereas "abcXYZ123@".IsAlphaNumeric() will return False. By default spaces are ignored in .IsAlphaNumeric() but you can make spaces an invalid character thus: "abc 123".IsAlphaNumeric(false) which will return False. – Cornelius J. van Dyk Jan 22 at 14:38

10 Answers 10

81

The easiest way it to use a regular expression:

Regular Expression for alphanumeric and underscores

Using regular expressions in .net:

http://www.regular-expressions.info/dotnet.html

MSDN Regular Expression

Regex.IsMatch

var regexItem = new Regex("^[a-zA-Z0-9 ]*$");

if(regexItem.IsMatch(YOUR_STRING)){..}
1
  • 2
    I made this helper function for my utility class. Its working perfectly public static bool ContainsOnlyAlphaNumericCharacters(this string inputString) { var regexItem = new Regex("^[a-zA-Z0-9 ]*$"); return regexItem.IsMatch(inputString); } – vibs2006 Jun 26 '19 at 12:41
89

Simple:

function HasSpecialChars(string yourString)
{
    return yourString.Any( ch => ! Char.IsLetterOrDigit( ch ) )
}
8
  • 8
    Why isn't this answer upvoted ? Seems correct and quick to me. Way beter than diving into the regex world for such an easy problem – Marcello Grechi Lins Feb 4 '15 at 16:21
  • 2
    @MarcelloGrechiLins Regex is completely valid and likely faster when using a compiled Regex and re-using it across a large # of strings. As usual with software development there are trade-offs. :-) – Norman H Apr 21 '15 at 12:54
  • 1
    I would actually down vote this - with just minimal testing, it brings back true for \n, and I doubt anyone wants that. Regex at least will limit it to actual special chars. – Charles Feb 26 '16 at 10:13
  • 6
    @Charles Read the original question: "How do I check a string to make sure it contains numbers, letters, or space ONLY?" The code snippet fulfills the requirement. – prmph Feb 28 '16 at 6:34
  • 3
    It does. My bad, answered this and confused it with another post about getting only special characters. – Charles Feb 28 '16 at 6:39
17
string s = @"$KUH% I*$)OFNlkfn$";
var withoutSpecial = new string(s.Where(c => Char.IsLetterOrDigit(c) 
                                            || Char.IsWhiteSpace(c)).ToArray());

if (s != withoutSpecial)
{
    Console.WriteLine("String contains special chars");
}
13

Try this way.

public static bool hasSpecialChar(string input)
    {
        string specialChar = @"\|!#$%&/()=?»«@£§€{}.-;'<>_,";
        foreach (var item in specialChar)
        {
            if (input.Contains(item)) return true;
        }

        return false;
    }
2
  • Cannot check " (Quotation ) – MAFAIZ Mar 14 '18 at 9:14
  • You can check for quotations by adding the escape \ before the " in the string. For example: "\|!#$%&/()=?»«@£§€{}.-;'\"<>_,"; – George Daniel Aug 30 '18 at 1:25
7
String test_string = "tesintg#$234524@#";
if (System.Text.RegularExpressions.Regex.IsMatch(test_string, "^[a-zA-Z0-9\x20]+$"))
{
  // Good-to-go
}

An example can be found here: http://ideone.com/B1HxA

4

If the list of acceptable characters is pretty small, you can use a regular expression like this:

Regex.IsMatch(items, "[a-z0-9 ]+", RegexOptions.IgnoreCase);

The regular expression used here looks for any character from a-z and 0-9 including a space (what's inside the square brackets []), that there is one or more of these characters (the + sign--you can use a * for 0 or more). The final option tells the regex parser to ignore case.

This will fail on anything that is not a letter, number, or space. To add more characters to the blessed list, add it inside the square brackets.

3

Use the regular Expression below in to validate a string to make sure it contains numbers, letters, or space only:

[a-zA-Z0-9 ]
2

You could do it with a bool. I've been learning recently and found I could do it this way. In this example, I'm checking a user's input to the console:

using System;
using System.Linq;

namespace CheckStringContent
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            //Get a password to check
            Console.WriteLine("Please input a Password: ");
            string userPassword = Console.ReadLine();

            //Check the string
            bool symbolCheck = userPassword.Any(p => !char.IsLetterOrDigit(p));

            //Write results to console
            Console.WriteLine($"Symbols are present: {symbolCheck}");     
        }
    }
}

This returns 'True' if special chars (symbolCheck) are present in the string, and 'False' if not present.

1

A great way using C# and Linq here:

public static bool HasSpecialCharacter(this string s)
{
    foreach (var c in s)
    {
        if(!char.IsLetterOrDigit(c))
        {
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
 }

And access it like this:

myString.HasSpecialCharacter();
0

While there are many ways to skin this cat, I prefer to wrap such code into reusable extension methods that make it trivial to do going forward. When using extension methods, you can also avoid RegEx as it is slower than a direct character check. I like using the extensions in the Extensions.cs NuGet package. It makes this check as simple as:

  1. Add the [https://www.nuget.org/packages/Extensions.cs][1] package to your project.
  2. Add "using Extensions;" to the top of your code.
  3. "smith23@".IsAlphaNumeric() will return False whereas "smith23".IsAlphaNumeric() will return True. By default the .IsAlphaNumeric() method ignores spaces, but it can also be overridden such that "smith 23".IsAlphaNumeric(false) will return False since the space is not considered part of the alphabet.
  4. Every other check in the rest of the code is simply MyString.IsAlphaNumeric().

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