1

I'm trying to develop a ORM-version of my non-ORM class to be able to store the object in a database (and retrieve it back, if possible).

from ruamel.yaml import YAMLObject

class User(YAMLObject):
    yaml_tag = u'user'

    def __init__(self, name, age):
        self.name = name
        self.age = age

    # Other useful methods

What I would like to achieve now is a similar object, that acts like User in the Python world, but that can be used also as an ORM object, hence being able to store it in a database. What I tried, ingenuously, is:

Base = declarative_base()

class SQLUser(Base, User):

    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    name = Column(String)
    age = Column(Integer)

    def __init__(self, name, age):
        self.name = name
        self.age = age

Running an example with this class hierarchy produces, on Python 2, the following error:

TypeError: Error when calling the metaclass bases metaclass conflict: the metaclass of a derived class must be a (non-strict) subclass of the metaclasses of all its bases

I believe this is related to YAMLObject metaclass... But I need it since I would like also to be able to save those objects as YAML. For what I read about this error I should, maybe, use a third metaclass that inherits both from YAMLObject metaclass and Base, then using it to create the class I want...

class MetaMixinUser(type(User), type(Base)):
    pass

class SQLUser(six.with_metaclass(MetaMixinUser)):
    #[...]

Unfortunately this gives another error:

AttributeError: type object 'SQLUser' has no attribute '_decl_class_registry'

Could you please point me where my reasoning is flawing?

4
  • You don't have to inherit from YAMLObject to be able to dump User. Subclassing is IMO the most intrusive way of enabling dumping and loading. And your User class probably doesn't work because it doesn't have a yaml_tag. Are you open to removing the dependency on YAMLObject?
    – Anthon
    Jul 12, 2017 at 9:45
  • @Anthon Sorry, I omitted the yaml_tag but it's there. I edited my question. The User class works correctly by itself (I implemented the to_yaml method to enable the class to be dumped correctly into YAML files). I'm open to everything, but in this way I can dump the object as I wish in a transparent way to the end-user. Just a yaml.dump works as expected...
    – rdbisme
    Jul 12, 2017 at 9:56
  • I added registering and decorating functionality to ruamel.yaml. I am not sure which of the solutions in my answer you actually used, but registering should work for you, decorating might still interfere because of the wrapping that it does.
    – Anthon
    Jul 16, 2017 at 6:20
  • @Anthon I used the decorator as you suggested and the inheritance was working as expected in the brief tests I did. Thanks for you help and support!
    – rdbisme
    Jul 17, 2017 at 8:38

1 Answer 1

1

If you are in a hurry: as of ruamel.yaml 0.15.19 you can register classes with one statement, without subclassing of YAMLObject:

yaml = ruamel.yaml.YAML()
yaml.register_class(User)

The YAMLObject is there for backwards compatibility with PyYAML, and although it might be convenient, I cannot really recommend using it for three reasons:

  1. It makes your class hierarchy dependent on YAMLObject, which, as you noticed, can interfere with other dependencies
  2. It uses the unsafe Loader by default
  3. A solution based on Python decorators would be as convenient and much less intrusive.

The only real thing that subclassing YAMLObject does is registering a constructor for that yaml_tag and a representer for subclass.

All examples assume from __future__ import print_function if you run Python 2.

If you have the following, based on subclassing YAMLObject:

import sys
import ruamel.yaml
from ruamel.std.pathlib import Path

yaml = ruamel.yaml.YAML(typ='unsafe')

class User(ruamel.yaml.YAMLObject):
    yaml_tag = u'user'

    def __init__(self, name, age):
        self.name = name
        self.age = age

    @classmethod
    def to_yaml(cls, representer, node):
        return representer.represent_scalar(cls.yaml_tag, 
                                            u'{.name}-{.age}'.format(node, node))

    @classmethod
    def from_yaml(cls, constructor, node):
        # type: (Any, Any) -> Any
        return User(*node.value.split('-'))


data = {'users': [User('Anthon', 18)]}
yaml.dump(data, sys.stdout)
print()
tmp_file = Path('tmp.yaml')
yaml.dump(data, tmp_file)
rd = yaml.load(tmp_file)
print(rd['users'][0].name, rd['users'][0].age)

that will get you:

users: [!<user> Anthon-18]

Anthon 18

You can get the exact same result without subclassing, by doing:

import sys
import ruamel.yaml
from ruamel.std.pathlib import Path

yaml = ruamel.yaml.YAML(typ='safe')

class User(object):
    yaml_tag = u'user'

    def __init__(self, name, age):
        self.name = name
        self.age = age

    @classmethod
    def to_yaml(cls, representer, node):
        return representer.represent_scalar(cls.yaml_tag, 
                                            u'{.name}-{.age}'.format(node, node))

    @classmethod
    def from_yaml(cls, constructor, node):
        # type: (Any, Any) -> Any
        return User(*node.value.split('-'))


yaml.representer.add_representer(User, User.to_yaml)
yaml.constructor.add_constructor(User.yaml_tag, User.from_yaml)

data = {'users': [User('Anthon', 18)]}

yaml.dump(data, sys.stdout)
print()
tmp_file = Path('tmp.yaml')
yaml.dump(data, tmp_file)
rd = yaml.load(tmp_file)
print(rd['users'][0].name, rd['users'][0].age)

The above uses the SafeLoader (and SafeDumper), which is a step in the right direction. But adding the XXXX.add_YYY lines above is nuisance if you have a lot of classes, as those entries are almost, but not quite, the same. And it doesn't handle classes missing either or both to_yaml and from_yaml.

To solve the above I suggest you make a decorator yaml_object and a helper class in a file myyaml.py:

import ruamel.yaml

yaml = ruamel.yaml.YAML(typ='safe')

class SafeYAMLObject(object):
    def __init__(self, cls):
        self._cls = cls

    def to_yaml(self, representer, data):
        return representer.represent_yaml_object(
            self._cls.yaml_tag, data, self._cls,
            flow_style=representer.default_flow_style)

    def from_yaml(self, constructor, node):
        return constructor.construct_yaml_object(node, self._cls)

def yaml_object(cls):
    yaml.representer.add_representer(
        cls, getattr(cls, 'to_yaml', SafeYAMLObject(cls).to_yaml))
    yaml.constructor.add_constructor(
        cls.yaml_tag, getattr(cls, 'from_yaml', SafeYAMLObject(cls).from_yaml))
    return cls

Having that you can do:

import sys
from ruamel.std.pathlib import Path
from myyaml import yaml, yaml_object

@yaml_object
class User(object):
    yaml_tag = u'user'

    def __init__(self, name, age):
        self.name = name
        self.age = age

    @classmethod
    def to_yaml(cls, representer, node):
        return representer.represent_scalar(cls.yaml_tag, 
                                            u'{.name}-{.age}'.format(node, node))

    @classmethod
    def from_yaml(cls, constructor, node):
        # type: (Any, Any) -> Any
        return User(*node.value.split('-'))


data = {'users': [User('Anthon', 18)]}

yaml.dump(data, sys.stdout)
print()
tmp_file = Path('tmp.yaml')
yaml.dump(data, tmp_file)
rd = yaml.load(tmp_file)
print(rd['users'][0].name, rd['users'][0].age)

again with the same result. If you remove the to_yaml and from_yaml methods, you would the same final value, but slightly different YAML:

users:
- !<user> {age: 18, name: Anthon}

Anthon 18

I have not been able to test this, but using this decorator instead of subclassing YAMLObject should get rid of the TypeError when doing:

class SQLUser(Base, User):

¹ Disclaimer: I am the author of the ruamel.yaml package used in this answer.
   Disclaimer 2: I am not really 18, but I do follow Brian Adams' adagium expressed in the title song of this album

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