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I'm trying to unit test a simple http REST client using mocha and chai libraries for Node.js with this code:

var chai = require('chai');
var asrt = require('chai').assert;
var client = require('../index');

describe('#Do successful', function () {
it('should pass when schema, host and port are provided', function () {
        client.do('http:', 'localhost', '8080', '', function (result) {
        console.log("starting assertions");
        asrt.isAbove(result.items.length,0);
        // ... other assertions
    });
});
});

when I run the test with npm test, the test "passes" but the line that logs "starting assertions" is never printed, because the client.do function callback is never called, but I see that the server properly received the request and responded.

I'm obviously missing something, but I can't understand what in particular. Please notice that:

1) a very similar piece of code used in a non-test file produces the expected outcome (which is: the callback is called and the result data if filled with the response data).

2) Again, I'm testing a client, not a server, so I suppose I shuldn't use the done() function (but I tried as well, and didn't work).

Have you any hint on how to fix this? Thanks

  • 1
    Could you show the source of client.do() ? – LEQADA Jul 12 '17 at 10:02
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Assuming that client.do is asynchronous because what you described is inline with the test executing, firing of asynchronous request, and not waiting for the response.

In this case the solution IS to use an asynchronous test with the done parameter:

var chai = require('chai');
var asrt = require('chai').assert;
var client = require('../index');

describe('#Do successful', function () {
  it('should pass when schema, host and port are provided', function (done) {
    client.do('http:', 'localhost', '8080', '', function (result) {
      console.log("starting assertions");
      asrt.isAbove(result.items.length,0);
      // ... other assertions
      // TEST WAITS FOR TIMEOUT OR UNTIL done() IS CALLED
      done();
    });
  });
});
  • Using done ensured the test proper behaviour. To further check that it worked, I also added some failure cases and it failed as expected. So, thanks. – Andrea Castello Jul 13 '17 at 6:53

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