22

When should i make a function private and why is it good idea?

  • 1
    I would vote up an answer that provide a concrete example. Currently the answers are not specific enough to argue against. – William Entriken Aug 22 '18 at 22:36
31

You should make a function private when you don't need other objects or classes to access the function, when you'll be invoking it from within the class.

Stick to the principle of least privilege, only allow access to variables/functions that are absolutely necessary. Anything that doesn't fit this criteria should be private.

  • 2
    (just an FYI since you've stressed the "method" terminology prefered in wider OO circles) "function" is the terminology used in the C++ Standard and quite correct in a C++ context. – Tony Delroy Dec 22 '10 at 4:15
23

I usually make the helper functions private. But what is helper seems to be vague. So let me give you an example. Suppose you've the following class Sample; it exposes few public functions, one of them, say, is DoWork(). This function takes one parameter. But it doesn't assume that the parameter will always be valid, so it first checks the validity of parameter for which it has lots of code in the beginning of the function. Something like this:

class Sample
{
   public:
      void DoWork(SomeClass param)
      {
               /*
                *lots of code related to validation of param
                */  

                //actual code that operates on the param 
                //and other member data IF the param is valid
      }
};

Since you've written lots of code related to validation of the param, it makes the function cumbersome, and difficult to read. So you decided to move this validation code to function say, IsValidParam(), and then you call this function from DoWork() passing the parameter param to it. Something like this:

class Sample
{
   public:
      void DoWork(SomeClass param)
      {       
            if ( IsValidParam(param))       
            {
                //actual code that operates on the param 
                //and other member data IF the param is valid
            }
      }
};

That looks cleaner, right?

Okay, you've written IsValidParam() somewhere in the class, but the question you face now is, would you make this function public? If this function is used only by your other functions like DoWork(), then making IsValidParam() public doesn't make sense. So you decided to make this function private.

class Sample
{
   public:
      void DoWork(SomeClass param)
      {       
            if ( IsValidParam(param))       
            {
                //actual code that operates on the param 
                //and other member data IF the param is valid
            }
      }
  private:
      bool IsValidParam(SomeClass param)
      {
          //check the validity of param.
          //return true if valid, else false.
      }
};

Functions of this kind (IsValidParam) should be private. I call these functions helper functions.

Hope this explanation helps you!

6

One of the founding principals of OOP is encapsulation. This is where functionality for how an object works is kept internal to that object. The idea is that it's easier for code to use an object if it doesn't need to know how it works. Kind of like buying a microwave--you just need to know how to use it and not how it works.

The same approach should be taken with OOP. Keep everything needed to maintain the object private. Make only what is needed to fully use the object public.

2

If you are designing a class - considering the way client code should use it - then you will inevitably derive an interface consisting of public and perhaps protected members.

private members are functions and data that supports and enables those public/protected members. private functions should factor and/or modularise/structure the code needed by the non-private members, making their implementation less redundant and easier to understand.

Summarily, you make a member private if it's not intended for direct use by client code, and only exists to support the non-private members.

1

How purist do you want to be? :)

The proper answer to this question is related to the maintenance of invariants. The right way to do this is rather complicated.

In your base class you define public methods to provide the whole of the access to the class. All these methods must be concrete. The key thing here is that the public invariants are assumed to hold before and after calling these functions. These functions must never call each other, they call only protected and private methods. These functions should be axiomatic: they should be a fairly minimal set required to capture the desired semantics.

Most calculations which can be done using these methods should be global or at least public static members.

You also provide pure virtual methods which are hooks to implement the details depending on the representation in derived classes. Virtual functions in the base should be private. The usual advice here (public) is completely wrong. Virtual functions are implementation details. One exception: the virtual destructor must be public.

Private helper functions can also be put in the base.

It may be useful to have protected methods in the base too: these will call the private helpers or virtuals. As above: protected methods should never call protected or public methods. Protected functions maintain a weaker invariant than the public one before and after each call.

Private functions usually maintain very weak invariants.

The reason for this strict hierarchy is to ensure the object invariants are maintained correctly.

Now, in a derived class you provide an implementation. Ideally, the virtual functions here would be invisible, a stronger condition than merely private. These virtual functions should not be called at all in the derived class. The only permitted access is via protected functions of the base.

All methods of derived classes including the destructor should be private. Constructors must be public, but they're not methods of the class.

In order to fully understand these rules you must think carefully about invariants. The public invariants can be assumed to hold prior to calling a public method and are required to hold after it is finished. Therefore you cannot call such functions from inside the class nor any class derived from it, because those functions are used to modify the representation in-between the start and end of a public function, and so inevitably break the public invariants: that's why they must not call the public functions.

The same argument applies to protected functions: functions can only call functions with weaker invariants.

Virtual functions are always called by the public from the base class public wrappers to ensure the sequencing of operations, which breaks public invariants, is never interrupted by returning to the public with a broken invariant. The set of virtuals themselves represent the invariant structure any representation must have. By doing this all manipulations of the representation to perform calculations for public clients can be abstracted into the base.

In practice, these rules are not usually followed because they would often generate trivial wrappers and that's a lot of extra code to write and maintain. So virtual functions often end up being public, even when this is completely and utterly wrong in principle.

  • 1
    "Therefore you cannot call such functions from inside the class" - that doesn't follow. You can't call them if the invariants don't hold at the time of the call, but you can call them at points where you happen to know the class invariants do hold, which for example will be the case if the calling code hasn't modified any data members yet. For example, std::string has functions size and length which return exactly the same value. There's no particular reason why one can't be implemented to call the other and return the result. size does not "inevitably break the public invariants". – Steve Jessop Dec 22 '10 at 10:23
  • 1
    For a non-const example, consider std::vector::pop_back, which can quite reasonably be implemented by calling two other public members: erase(--end()). You're talking specifically about the implementation of the NVI idiom, in which by design every public function does nothing other than call a private virtual function. But that is not the only good way to write a class in C++, and its reason for making the virtual functions private is not so that they can be called while the object is in a state that violates its class invariants. They generally can't. – Steve Jessop Dec 22 '10 at 10:35
0

Before creating a function or class we should understand scope of that function or class whether it is Globally or Locally.

eg:"ConnectionString ()". Every database connection needs "ConnectionString () " so its declared Public .

0

private: only used by this class, not used by other classes nor derived classes.
protected: used by this class and maybe derived classes, but not used by other classes.
public: used by other class, this class, and derived class.

It's hard to choose between private and protected. So I always make a function protected if there is 1% chance that derived classes may need it.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.