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I am using Boost::Geometry::Buffer to create an inner offset, or dilation, of irregularly shaped polygons. The image below shows an example input and output. The original polygon is displayed in white and the offset polygon is displayed in purple. There are two sets of extraneous lines on the right side of the purple polygon (seen as the thicker/brighter regions) and a long extraneous spike on the left.

Example output from Boost::Geometry::Buffer

The polygon used in the example is pretty basic. It lacks any kind of symmetry, but has no sharp turns or jagged edges. The raw data for the input polygon is this list of Cartesian points:

x: 61.2101898, y: 81.9854202
x: 61.3715706, y: 82.0616913
x: 61.4335442, y: 82.1924744
x: 61.4778328, y: 82.2606735
x: 61.5202942, y: 82.3236465
x: 61.5283432, y: 82.3527832
x: 61.5431557, y: 82.4063950
x: 61.5221367, y: 82.4381790
x: 61.3944855, y: 82.4706116
x: 61.3497124, y: 82.4679184
x: 61.3284111, y: 82.4674301
x: 61.1539803, y: 82.3401947
x: 61.1297760, y: 82.2854843
x: 61.0671043, y: 82.1489639
x: 61.0682831, y: 82.0264740
x: 61.0667953, y: 82.0112915
x: 61.0663414, y: 82.0066376
x: 61.0707321, y: 81.9976196
x: 61.0998306, y: 81.9980850
x: 61.2101898, y: 81.9854202

This is the code that I am using to generate the offset polygon:

namespace bg = boost::geometry;
typedef bg::model::d2::point_xy<float> BoostPoint;
typedef bg::model::polygon<BoostPoint> BoostPolygon;
typedef bg::model::multi_polygon<BoostPolygon> BoostMultipolygon;

std::vector<BoostPoint> points;
BoostPoint tmpPoint;
BoostPolygon input;
BoostMultipolygon output;

/* currentContour is a pointer to a non-Boost specialized polygon
*  structure. It contains a bool indicating clockwise/counterclockwise
*  direction and a list of lines, each line defined by two x-y points.
*  For each line, point 2 follows point 1 in the clockwise/counterclockwise
*  direction of that polygon.
*/

if (currentContour->clockwise) {
    for (int line = 0; line < currentContour->lines.size(); line++) {
        bg::set<0>(tmpPoint, currentContour->lines[line].x1);
        bg::set<1>(tmpPoint, currentContour->lines[line].y1);
        points.push_back(tmpPoint);
    }
    // Add last point to wrap back around to starting point.
    bg::set<0>(tmpPoint, currentContour->lines.back().x2);
    bg::set<1>(tmpPoint, currentContour->lines.back().y2);
    points.push_back(tmpPoint);
}
else {
    for (int line = currentContour->lines.size() - 1; line >= 0; line--) {
        bg::set<0>(tmpPoint, currentContour->lines[line].x2);
        bg::set<1>(tmpPoint, currentContour->lines[line].y2);
        points.push_back(tmpPoint);
    }
    // Add last point to wrap back around to starting point.
    bg::set<0>(tmpPoint, currentContour->lines.front().x1);
    bg::set<1>(tmpPoint, currentContour->lines.front().y1);
    points.push_back(tmpPoint);
}

// Transfer points to polygon object.
bg::assign_points(input, points);
// Declare boost strategies for buffer function.
bg::strategy::buffer::distance_symmetric<double> distance_strategy(-0.05);
bg::strategy::buffer::join_miter join_strategy;
bg::strategy::buffer::end_round end_strategy;
bg::strategy::buffer::point_circle point_strategy;
bg::strategy::buffer::side_straight side_strategy;
// Perform polygon buffering.
bg::buffer(input, output, distance_strategy, side_strategy, join_strategy,
    end_strategy, point_strategy);

Boost is a major reputable library, so I have a hard time believing that its geometry APIs would fail on a polygon so simple. Why am I getting those extraneous lines? If any additional information would be helpful, I will be happy to provide it.

  • The raw data "in case that's useful". What. That's the most useful bit. – sehe Jul 13 '17 at 9:04
  • 2
    Geez. Who's being constructive. Or jumpy. I'm sorry I spent the time. I guess? – sehe Jul 13 '17 at 9:11
  • 1
    @ChrisD if you know what the problem was, why bother asking here? – Bartek Banachewicz Jul 13 '17 at 9:18
  • I wasn't nitpicking that clause. I was pointing out that since you have a problem with a specific case, the specific case is the only thing that really matters. I'd have preferred if you had none of the explanation and a solid self-contained code question. That, incidentally is in the guidelines for writing good questions. Even if you assume that the problem was with a "probable misunderstanding of the library", I can tell you that there are probably 2 people in the know on this site. And they visit the site probably once a month. No need to bet your hedges on a freak incident. – sehe Jul 13 '17 at 19:24
  • Many people are willing to share their energy to help see issues, me included. In your verdict of what I said I wonder how you seem to know my motives. I don't assume I know yours. Here's a peek behind the scenes that may give a little perspective on that. I hope this clears up a bit on the perceived arrogance and dismissiveness. I truly hope my answer is helpful, regardless of whether using the different join strategy makes sense at all. – sehe Jul 13 '17 at 19:25
3

We can't tell, because you failed to include the source data. Your "currentContour" could contain anything.

Working instead with the raw data you - fortunately - included, I read the polygon from WKT:

boost::geometry::read_wkt("POLYGON((61.2101898 81.9854202, 61.3715706 82.0616913, 61.4335442 82.1924744, 61.4778328 82.2606735, 61.5202942 82.3236465, 61.5283432 82.3527832, 61.5431557 82.4063950, 61.5221367 82.4381790, 61.3944855 82.4706116, 61.3497124 82.4679184, 61.3284111 82.4674301, 61.1539803 82.3401947, 61.1297760 82.2854843, 61.0671043 82.1489639, 61.0682831 82.0264740, 61.0667953 82.0112915, 61.0663414 82.0066376, 61.0707321 81.9976196, 61.0998306 81.9980850, 61.2101898 81.9854202))", input);

Validation fails, because it's in the wrong orientation:

I can't tell whether your orientation was correctly managed by the clockwise flag, so check it as follows:

{
    std::string reason;
    if (!bg::is_valid(input, reason))
        std::cout << "Input is not valid: " << reason << "\n";
}

In case you need to fix any fixable errors:

bg::correct(input);

After that I got a clean buffer, but I see the spike. Not being well versed in all the options to buffer, I "randomly" changed join_miter to join_round and it went away:

Live On Wandbox

#include <boost/geometry/geometry.hpp>
#include <boost/geometry/io/io.hpp>
#include <boost/geometry/geometries/point_xy.hpp>
#include <fstream>
#include <iostream>

namespace bg = boost::geometry;
typedef bg::model::d2::point_xy<float> BoostPoint;
typedef bg::model::polygon<BoostPoint> BoostPolygon;
typedef bg::model::multi_polygon<BoostPolygon> BoostMultipolygon;

int main() {
    BoostPolygon input;
    BoostMultipolygon output;

    boost::geometry::read_wkt("POLYGON((61.2101898 81.9854202, 61.3715706 82.0616913, 61.4335442 82.1924744, 61.4778328 82.2606735, 61.5202942 82.3236465, 61.5283432 82.3527832, 61.5431557 82.4063950, 61.5221367 82.4381790, 61.3944855 82.4706116, 61.3497124 82.4679184, 61.3284111 82.4674301, 61.1539803 82.3401947, 61.1297760 82.2854843, 61.0671043 82.1489639, 61.0682831 82.0264740, 61.0667953 82.0112915, 61.0663414 82.0066376, 61.0707321 81.9976196, 61.0998306 81.9980850, 61.2101898 81.9854202))", input);
    {
        std::string reason;
        if (!bg::is_valid(input, reason))
            std::cout << "Input is not valid: " << reason << "\n";
    }
    bg::correct(input);
    {
        std::string reason;
        if (!bg::is_valid(input, reason))
            std::cout << "Input is not valid: " << reason << "\n";
        else
            std::cout << "Input is valid";
    }

    // Declare boost strategies for buffer function.
    bg::strategy::buffer::distance_symmetric<double> distance_strategy(-0.05);
    bg::strategy::buffer::join_round join_strategy;
    bg::strategy::buffer::end_round end_strategy;
    bg::strategy::buffer::point_circle point_strategy;
    bg::strategy::buffer::side_straight side_strategy;
    // Perform polygon buffering.
    bg::buffer(input, output, distance_strategy, side_strategy, join_strategy, end_strategy, point_strategy);

    {
        std::ofstream svg("output.svg");
        boost::geometry::svg_mapper<BoostPoint> mapper(svg, 400, 400);
        mapper.add(output);
        mapper.add(input);

        mapper.map(input, "fill-opacity:0.5;fill:rgb(153,204,0);stroke:rgb(153,204,0);stroke-width:2");
        mapper.map(output, "fill-opacity:0.5;fill:rgb(204,153,0);stroke:rgb(202,153,0);stroke-width:2");
    }
}

enter image description here

  • I appreciate the response. I'll have to figure out how my concept of orientation differs from Boost's. Unfortunately, my use case requires mitered ends. Anyone know why the mitered ends aren't working? – Chris D Jul 13 '17 at 18:25
  • I don't. Maybe you could ask a simplified, targeted question about that. And I'd consider posting to the library mailing list, because the devs are quite active there (they sporadically contribute on SO too) – sehe Jul 13 '17 at 19:29
0

I wasn't able to get mitered ends working with Boost. I instead switched to the Clipper Library which handled mitered ends without a hitch.

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