4

What is the difference between:

definition 1

data class Person (var name:String, var age:Int)

definition 2

class Person (var name:String, var age:Int)

definition 3

class Person (){
    var name:String = ""
    var age:Int = 1
}

In the 3 cases when i use the autocomplete i saw the same methods availables like a POJO... is the same but 3 differents ways?

enter image description here

14

Difference in equals, hashCode, & toString

the most important difference between definition 1 and definitions 2 & 3 is that in definition 1, the equals, hashcode and toString methods are overridden for you:

  • equals and hashCode methods test for structural equality
  • toString method returns a nice, human-friendly string

Code example:

NOTE: in Kotlin, the == operator calls an object's .equals() method. see operator overloading on kotlinlang.org for more info.

data class Person1 (var name:String, var age:Int)
class Person2 (var name:String, var age:Int)

@Test fun test1()
{
    val alice1 = Person1("Alice", 22)
    val alice2 = Person1("Alice", 22)
    val bob = Person1("bob", 23)

    // alice1 and alice2 are structurally equal, so this returns true.
    println(alice1 == alice2)   // true

    // alice1 and bob are NOT structurally equal, so this returns false.
    println(alice1 == bob)      // false

    // the toString method for data classes are generated for you.
    println(alice1)     // Person1(name=Alice, age=22)
}

@Test fun test2()
{
    val alice1 = Person2("Alice", 22)
    val alice2 = Person2("Alice", 22)
    val bob = Person2("bob", 23)

    // even though alice1 and alice2 are structurally equal, this returns false.
    println(alice1 == alice2) // false
    println(alice1 == bob)    // false

    // the toString method for normal classes are NOT generated for you.
    println(alice1)  // Person2@1ed6993a
}

Difference in constructors

another difference between definitions 1 & 2 and definition 3 is that:

  • definitions 1 & 2 both have a constructor that takes 2 parameters
  • definition 3 only has a no argument constructor that assigns default values to the class members.

Code example:

data class Person1 (var name:String, var age:Int)
class Person2 (var name:String, var age:Int)
class Person3 ()
{
    var name:String = ""
    var age:Int = 1
}

@Test fun test3()
{
    Person1("alice",22)     // OK
    Person2("bob",23)       // OK
    Person3("charlie",22)   // error

    Person1()   // error
    Person2()   // error
    Person3()   // OK
}

The copy method

Finally, another difference between definition 1 and definitions 2 & 3 is that in definition 1, a copy method is generated for it. Here's an example of how it can be used:

val jack = Person1("Jack", 1)
val olderJack = jack.copy(age = 2)

// jack.age = 1
// olderJack.age = 2

Check out the official documentation for data classes on kotlinlang.org!

  • The most important is the difference between definition 1 and definition 2, without the data i have the same result ? i try and is the same. – josedlujan Jul 13 '17 at 0:20
  • the most important difference between definition 1 and definition 2 is that the equals, hashcode and tostring methods are generated for you in definition 1. i have edited the answer to show an example of how they differ – Eric Jul 13 '17 at 0:30
  • I saw the hascode, equals and tostring in the definition 1 and definition 2. – josedlujan Jul 13 '17 at 0:37
  • oh yes, that's true. It is how they behave that is different. for example, if I use definition 1 to create two objects that have the same name and age, the statement person1 == person2 will equal to true. but, if i used definition 2, the same statement would be false. this is because the equals method for data classes tests for structural equality. (that all members in both objects are the same) – Eric Jul 13 '17 at 0:40
  • Thanks a lot for your patient, why is false? – josedlujan Jul 13 '17 at 0:48
0

Definition 1 (data class Person(var name: String, var age: Int) is the equivalent of

/* every class by default in kotlin is final but a data class CAN'T be open */
final class Person(var name: String, var age: Int) {
    override fun equals(other: Any?): Boolean {
        if (this === other) return true
        if (other?.javaClass != javaClass) return false

        other as Person

        if (name != other.name) return false
        if (age != other.age) return false

        return true
    }

    override fun hashCode(): Int {
        var result = name.hashCode()
        result = 31 * result + age
        return result
    }
}

val person = Person("Name", 123)

Definition 2 (class Person(var name: String, var age: Int [no data modifier]) is the equivalent of

class Person(var name: String, var age: Int) {
}

val person = Person("Name", 123)

Definition 3 is the equivalent of

class Person() {
    var name: String = ""
    var age: Int = 1
}

val person = Person() // name = "", age = 1 (by default)
person.name = "Name"
person.age = 123
  • Why I saw the hashcode, equals and tostring in the definition 1 and definition 2 ? – josedlujan Jul 13 '17 at 0:39
  • @josedlujan What do you mean? hashCode, equals and toString are automatically generated for classes with data modifier – Mibac Jul 13 '17 at 0:42
  • The picture in my question show the same when i use definition 1 and definition 2, both answers has hascode, equals and toString with or without data modifier. – josedlujan Jul 13 '17 at 0:46
  • @josedlujan Yeah they do because every class has it but when you don't override it then it won't do what you expect it to do. Try running this: val p1 = Person("", 0); val p2 = Person("", 0); fun main(args: Array<String>) { println(p1 == p2) }. This will print false even though these two persons are equal, right? That's the problem and that's why you need to override equals – Mibac Jul 13 '17 at 0:49

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