0

I am trying to do a simple read of a .bmp file, and then output that same .bmp file. Right now, it only works if the width and height are the exact same. That's a good indicator of what my problem is, but I can't seem to figure it out. I'm looking for any ideas or suggestions y'all may have. There are other questions about this, but they seem not to be exactly what I'm looking for. However, my output when the width and height are different is similar to the output that is shown here Read/Write SImple BMP Image C++ - basically it's skewed, incomplete, and repetitive, not the actual image.

Here is the code where I read in the .bmp file:

    bool LoadBmp(const char *filepath)
    {
        FILE *f = fopen(filepath, "rb");
        if (f)
        {
          Bwidth = 0;
          Bheight = 0;
          pixels = NULL;
          unsigned char info[54] = {0};
          fread(info, sizeof(unsigned char), 54, f);
          Bwidth = *(unsigned int *)&info[18];
          Bheight = *(unsigned int *)&info[22];
          unsigned int size = Bwidth * Bheight * 3; // ((((Bwidth * Bheight) + 31) & ~31) / 8) * Bheight;
          pixels = malloc(size);
          fread(pixels, sizeof(unsigned char), size, f);
          fclose(f);
          return true;
       }  
       return false;
   }

Note that I was unsure whether to create size how I do below (Bwidth * Bheight * 3) or use what is commented out. Also note that 'Bwidth' and 'Bheight' are declared as unsigned int, whereas 'pixels' is defined as unsigned char*. Additionally, I purposely am not using a struct to store .bmp file data.

Here is the code that I use to write the .bmp file that I just loaded:

    static bool WriteBMP(int x, int y, unsigned char *bmp, char * name)
    {
      const unsigned char bmphdr[54] = {66, 77, 255, 255, 255, 255, 0, 0, 0, 0, 54, 4, 0, 0, 40, 0, 0, 0, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 1, 0, 8, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 255, 255, 255, 255, 196, 14, 0, 0, 196, 14, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0};
      unsigned char hdr[1078];
      int i, j, c, xcorr, diff;
      FILE *f;

      xcorr = (x+3) >> 2 << 2;  // BMPs have to be a multiple of 4 pixels wide.
      diff = xcorr - x;

      for (i = 0; i < 54; i++) hdr[i] = bmphdr[i];
      *((int*)(&hdr[18])) = xcorr;
      *((int*)(&hdr[22])) = y;
      *((int*)(&hdr[34])) = xcorr*y;
      *((int*)(&hdr[2])) = xcorr*y + 1078;
      for (i = 0; i < 256; i++) {
        j = i*4 + 54;
        hdr[j+0] = i;  // blue
        hdr[j+1] = i;  // green
        hdr[j+2] = i;  // red
        hdr[j+3] = 0;  // dummy
      }

      f = fopen(name, "wb");
      if (f) {
          assert(f != NULL);
          c = fwrite(hdr, 1, 1078, f);
          assert(c == 1078);
          if (diff == 0) {
            c = fwrite(bmp, 1, x*y, f);
            assert(c == x*y);
          } else {
            *((int*)(&hdr[0])) = 0;  // need up to three zero bytes
            for (j = 0; j < y; j++) {
              c = fwrite(&bmp[j * x], 1, x, f);
              assert(c == x);
              c = fwrite(hdr, 1, diff, f);
              assert(c == diff);
            }
          }
          fclose(f);
          return true;
      }
      else return false;
    }

Thanks in advance for your help. I appreciate your time!

  • The casts invoke undefined behaviour. Write correct code, until then it is pointless to specilate what else is wrong. – too honest for this site Jul 13 '17 at 0:12
  • in a .bmp file, the actual length of each row is a multiple of 4, so needs to be allowed for. there are a lot of other fields before the beginning of the actual pixel information. A pixel could be 1byte or 3bytes or 4bytes, the code needs to actually check the appropriate fields to determine the actual pixel size. The code should be checking the 'file offset to pixel array' 4byte field (about offset 10 in the file) to get the offset to the pixel array. About offset 28 is a 2byte field that contains the 'bits per pixel' see: 'en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BMP_file_format' for details – user3629249 Jul 13 '17 at 5:10
  • regarding: if (f) { assert(f != NULL); the only way for the execution to enter that 'if' block is if 'f' is not NULL, so the assert() will never by invoked – user3629249 Jul 13 '17 at 5:11
  • If the call to fopen() fails, the program exits with out telling the user anything. suggest, when it fails, use: perror( "fopen failed" ); exit( EXIT_FAILURE ); – user3629249 Jul 13 '17 at 5:12
  • what are you expecting the code to do when malloc() fails? Strongly suggest you check for that condition and handle the problem so the user knows what happened. – user3629249 Jul 13 '17 at 5:18

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.