I am looking for a command that will accept as input multiple lines of text, each line containing a single integer, and output the sum of these integers.

As a bit of background, I have a log file which includes timing measurements, so through grepping for the relevant lines, and a bit of sed reformatting I can list all of the timings in that file. I'd like to work out the total however, and my mind has gone blank as to any command I can pipe this intermediate output to in order to do the final sum. I've always used expr in the past, but unless it runs in RPN mode I don't think it's going to cope with this (and even then it would be tricky).

What am I missing? Given that there are probably several ways to achieve this, I will be happy to read (and upvote) any approach that works, even if someone else has already posted a different solution that does the job.

Related question: Shortest command to calculate the sum of a column of output on Unix? (credits @Andrew)


Update: Wow, as expected there are some nice answers here. Looks like I will definitely have to give awk deeper inspection as a command-line tool in general!

41 Answers 41

up vote 1122 down vote accepted

Bit of awk should do it?

awk '{s+=$1} END {print s}' mydatafile

Note: some versions of awk have some odd behaviours if you are going to be adding anything exceeding 2^31 (2147483647). See comments for more background. One suggestion is to use printf rather than print:

awk '{s+=$1} END {printf "%.0f", s}' mydatafile
  • 5
    There's a lot of awk love in this room! I like how a simple script like this could be modified to add up a second column of data just by changing the $1 to $2 – Paul Dixon Jan 16 '09 at 16:02
  • 1
    There's not a practical limit, since it will process the input as a stream. So, if it can handle a file of X lines, you can be pretty sure it can handle X+1. – Paul Dixon Feb 25 '12 at 8:36
  • 3
    I once wrote a rudimentary mailing list processer with an awk script run via the vacation utility. Good times. :) – L S Mar 7 '12 at 16:05
  • 2
    just used this for a: count all documents’ pages script: ls $@ | xargs -i pdftk {} dump_data | grep NumberOfPages | awk '{s+=$2} END {print s}' – flying sheep Jul 10 '13 at 14:42
  • 4
    Be careful, it will not work with numbers greater than 2147483647 (i.e., 2^31), that's because awk uses a 32 bit signed integer representation. Use awk '{s+=$1} END {printf "%.0f", s}' mydatafile instead. – Giancarlo Sportelli Feb 5 '15 at 23:34

Paste typically merges lines of multiple files, but it can also be used to convert individual lines of a file into a single line. The delimiter flag allows you to pass a x+x type equation to bc.

paste -s -d+ infile | bc

Alternatively, when piping from stdin,

<commands> | paste -s -d+ - | bc
  • 1
    Very nice! I would have put a space before the "+", just to help me parse it better, but that was very handy for piping some memory numbers through paste & then bc. – Michael H. Sep 8 '10 at 5:34
  • 65
    Much easier to remember and type than the awk solution. Also, note that paste can use a dash - as the filename - which will allow you to pipe the numbers from the output of a command into paste's standard output without the need to create a file first: <commands> | paste -sd+ - | bc – George Mar 20 '12 at 19:15
  • 15
    I have a file with 100 million numbers. The awk command takes 21s; the paste command takes 41s. But good to meet 'paste' nevertheless! – Abhi Jan 25 '13 at 6:07
  • 2
    @Abhi: Interesting :D I guess it would take me 20s to figure out the awk command so it evens out though until I try 100 million and one numbers :D – Mark K Cowan Jul 2 '14 at 9:21
  • 4
    @George You can leave out the -, though. (It is useful if you wanted to combine a file with stdin). – Alois Mahdal Jan 16 '16 at 21:51

The one-liner version in Python:

$ python -c "import sys; print(sum(int(l) for l in sys.stdin))"
  • Above one-liner doesn't work for files in sys.argv[], but that one does stackoverflow.com/questions/450799/… – jfs Jan 16 '09 at 16:21
  • True- the author said he was going to pipe output from another script into the command and I was trying to make it as short as possible :) – dF. Jan 16 '09 at 18:18
  • 30
    Shorter version would be python -c"import sys; print(sum(map(int, sys.stdin)))" – jfs Jan 17 '09 at 12:39
  • 2
    I love this answer for its ease of reading and flexibility. I needed the average size of files smaller than 10Mb in a collection of directories and modified it to this: find . -name '*.epub' -exec stat -c %s '{}' \; | python -c "import sys; nums = [int(n) for n in sys.stdin if int(n) < 10000000]; print(sum(nums)/len(nums))" – Paul Whipp Oct 23 '12 at 0:33
  • Very flexible solution. Also usable for float numbers, just replace int with float – geekQ Oct 2 '15 at 8:43

Plain bash:

$ cat numbers.txt 
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
$ sum=0; while read num; do ((sum += num)); done < numbers.txt; echo $sum
55

I would put a big WARNING on the commonly approved solution:

awk '{s+=$1} END {print s}' mydatafile # DO NOT USE THIS!!

that is because in this form awk uses a 32 bit signed integer representation: it will overflow for sums that exceed 2147483647 (i.e., 2^31).

A more general answer (for summing integers) would be:

awk '{s+=$1} END {printf "%.0f\n", s}' mydatafile # USE THIS INSTEAD

P.S. I would have liked to comment the first answer, but I don't have enough reputation..

  • Why does printf() help here? The overflow of the int will have happened before that because the summing code is the same. – Robert Klemme Mar 10 '15 at 17:30
  • 8
    Because the problem is actually in the "print" function. Awk uses 64 bit integers, but for some reason print donwscales them to 32 bit. – Giancarlo Sportelli Mar 12 '15 at 17:17
  • 2
    The print bug appears to be fixed, at least for awk 4.0.1 & bash 4.3.11, unless I'm mistaken: echo -e "2147483647 \n 100" |awk '{s+=$1}END{print s}' shows 2147483747 – Xen2050 Feb 23 '17 at 9:38
  • Using floats just introduces a new problem: echo 999999999999999999 | awk '{s+=$1} END {printf "%.0f\n", s}' produces 1000000000000000000 – Patrick Oct 24 '17 at 18:53
dc -f infile -e '[+z1<r]srz1<rp'

Note that negative numbers prefixed with minus sign should be translated for dc, since it uses _ prefix rather than - prefix for that. For example, via tr '-' '_' | dc -f- -e '...'.

Edit: Since this answer got so many votes "for obscurity", here is a detailed explanation:

The expression [+z1<r]srz1<rp does the following:

[   interpret everything to the next ] as a string
  +   push two values off the stack, add them and push the result
  z   push the current stack depth
  1   push one
  <r  pop two values and execute register r if the original top-of-stack (1)
      is smaller
]   end of the string, will push the whole thing to the stack
sr  pop a value (the string above) and store it in register r
z   push the current stack depth again
1   push 1
<r  pop two values and execute register r if the original top-of-stack (1)
    is smaller
p   print the current top-of-stack

As pseudo-code:

  1. Define "add_top_of_stack" as:
    1. Remove the two top values off the stack and add the result back
    2. If the stack has two or more values, run "add_top_of_stack" recursively
  2. If the stack has two or more values, run "add_top_of_stack"
  3. Print the result, now the only item left in the stack

To really understand the simplicity and power of dc, here is a working Python script that implements some of the commands from dc and executes a Python version of the above command:

### Implement some commands from dc
registers = {'r': None}
stack = []
def add():
    stack.append(stack.pop() + stack.pop())
def z():
    stack.append(len(stack))
def less(reg):
    if stack.pop() < stack.pop():
        registers[reg]()
def store(reg):
    registers[reg] = stack.pop()
def p():
    print stack[-1]

### Python version of the dc command above

# The equivalent to -f: read a file and push every line to the stack
import fileinput
for line in fileinput.input():
    stack.append(int(line.strip()))

def cmd():
    add()
    z()
    stack.append(1)
    less('r')

stack.append(cmd)
store('r')
z()
stack.append(1)
less('r')
p()
  • 2
    dc is just the tool of choice to use. But I would do it with a little less stack ops. Assumed that all lines really contain a number: (echo "0"; sed 's/$/ +/' inp; echo 'pq')|dc. – ikrabbe Jul 6 '15 at 10:02
  • 4
    The online algorithm: dc -e '0 0 [+?z1<m]dsmxp'. So we don't save all the numbers on stack before processing but read and process them one by one (to be more precise, line by line, since one line can contain several numbers). Note that empty line can terminate an input sequence. – ruvim Oct 2 '15 at 11:42
  • @ikrabbe that's great. It can actually be shortened by one more character: the space in the sed substitution can be removed, as dc doesn't care about spaces between arguments and operators. (echo "0"; sed 's/$/+/' inputFile; echo 'pq')|dc – WhiteHotLoveTiger Jun 13 '16 at 2:05

With jq:

seq 10 | jq -s 'add' # 'add' is equivalent to 'reduce .[] as $item (0; . + $item)'
  • 2
    I like this because I guess it is so clear and short that I might actually be able to remember it. – Alfe Nov 7 '17 at 14:40

Pure and short bash.

f=$(cat numbers.txt)
echo $(( ${f//$'\n'/+} ))
  • 8
    This is the best solution because it does not create any subprocess if you replace first line with f=$(<numbers.txt). – loentar Jun 19 '13 at 6:12
  • 1
    any way of having the input from stdin ? like from a pipe ? – njzk2 Jan 31 '14 at 18:35
  • @njzk2 If you put f=$(cat); echo $(( ${f//$'\n'/+} )) in a script, then you can pipe anything to that script or invoke it without arguments for interactive stdin input (terminate with Control-D). – mklement0 Apr 26 '14 at 4:02
  • 3
    @loentar The <numbers.txt is an improvement, but, overall, this solution is only efficient for small input files; for instance, with a file of 1,000 input lines the accepted awk solution is about 20 times faster on my machine - and also consumes less memory, because the file is not read all at once. – mklement0 Apr 26 '14 at 4:08
  • I had almost lost hope when I reached this one. Pure bash! – Omer Akhter Jan 19 '15 at 3:20
perl -lne '$x += $_; END { print $x; }' < infile.txt
  • I've removed -l and <. – jfs Jan 16 '09 at 16:03
  • 4
    And I added them back: "-l" ensures that output is LF-terminated as shell `` backticks and most programs expect, and "<" indicates this command can be used in a pipeline. – j_random_hacker Jan 16 '09 at 16:08
  • You are right. As an excuse: Each character in Perl one-liners requires a mental work for me, therefore I prefer to strip as many characters as possible. The habit was harmful in this case. – jfs Jan 16 '09 at 16:17
  • 1
    No worries J.F. :) – j_random_hacker Jan 16 '09 at 16:41
  • 2
    One of the few solutions that doesn't load everything into RAM. – Erik Aronesty Oct 4 '16 at 19:14

My fifteen cents:

$ cat file.txt | xargs  | sed -e 's/\ /+/g' | bc

Example:

$ cat text
1
2
3
3
4
5
6
78
9
0
1
2
3
4
576
7
4444
$ cat text | xargs  | sed -e 's/\ /+/g' | bc 
5148
  • My input could contain blank lines, so I used what you posted here plus a grep -v '^$'. Thanks! – James Oravec Apr 7 '15 at 16:26
  • wow!! your answer is amazing! my personal favorite from all in the tread – thahgr Sep 2 '16 at 10:44
  • Love this and +1 for pipeline. Very simple and easy solution for me – Gelin Luo Sep 3 '17 at 21:59

BASH solution, if you want to make this a command (e.g. if you need to do this frequently):

addnums () {
  local total=0
  while read val; do
    (( total += val ))
  done
  echo $total
}

Then usage:

addnums < /tmp/nums

Plain bash one liner

$ cat > /tmp/test
1 
2 
3 
4 
5
^D

$ echo $(( $(cat /tmp/test | tr "\n" "+" ) 0 ))
  • 3
    No cat needed: echo $(( $( tr "\n" "+" < /tmp/test) 0 )) – agc Apr 11 '16 at 15:30

I've done a quick benchmark on the existing answers which

  • use only standard tools (sorry for stuff like lua or rocket),
  • are real one-liners,
  • are capable of adding huge amounts of numbers (100 million), and
  • are fast (I ignored the ones which took longer than a minute).

I always added the numbers of 1 to 100 million which was doable on my machine in less than a minute for several solutions.

Here are the results:

Python

:; seq 100000000 | python -c 'import sys; print sum(map(int, sys.stdin))'
5000000050000000
# 30s
:; seq 100000000 | python -c 'import sys; print sum(int(s) for s in sys.stdin)'
5000000050000000
# 38s
:; seq 100000000 | python3 -c 'import sys; print(sum(int(s) for s in sys.stdin))'
5000000050000000
# 27s
:; seq 100000000 | python3 -c 'import sys; print(sum(map(int, sys.stdin)))'
5000000050000000
# 22s
:; seq 100000000 | pypy -c 'import sys; print(sum(map(int, sys.stdin)))'
5000000050000000
# 11s
:; seq 100000000 | pypy -c 'import sys; print(sum(int(s) for s in sys.stdin))'
5000000050000000
# 11s

Awk

:; seq 100000000 | awk '{s+=$1} END {print s}'
5000000050000000
# 22s

Paste & Bc

This ran out of memory on my machine. It worked for half the size of the input (50 million numbers):

:; seq 50000000 | paste -s -d+ - | bc
1250000025000000
# 17s
:; seq 50000001 100000000 | paste -s -d+ - | bc
3750000025000000
# 18s

So I guess it would have taken ~35s for the 100 million numbers.

Perl

:; seq 100000000 | perl -lne '$x += $_; END { print $x; }'
5000000050000000
# 15s
:; seq 100000000 | perl -e 'map {$x += $_} <> and print $x'
5000000050000000
# 48s

Ruby

:; seq 100000000 | ruby -e "puts ARGF.map(&:to_i).inject(&:+)"
5000000050000000
# 30s

C

Just for comparison's sake I compiled the C version and tested this also, just to have an idea how much slower the tool-based solutions are.

#include <stdio.h>
int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    long sum = 0;
    long i = 0;
    while(scanf("%ld", &i) == 1) {
        sum = sum + i;
    }
    printf("%ld\n", sum);
    return 0;
}

 

:; seq 100000000 | ./a.out 
5000000050000000
# 8s

Conclusion

C is of course fastest with 8s, but the Pypy solution only adds a very little overhead of about 30% to 11s. But, to be fair, Pypy isn't exactly standard. Most people only have CPython installed which is significantly slower (22s), exactly as fast as the popular Awk solution.

The fastest solution based on standard tools is Perl (15s).

  • The paste + bc approach was just what I was looking for to sum hex values, thanks! – Tomislav Nakic-Alfirevic Nov 14 '17 at 11:09
  • Just for fun, in Rust: use std::io::{self, BufRead}; fn main() { let stdin = io::stdin(); let mut sum: i64 = 0; for line in stdin.lock().lines() { sum += line.unwrap().parse::<i64>().unwrap(); } println!("{}", sum); } – Jocelyn Aug 26 at 9:40

The following works in bash:

I=0

for N in `cat numbers.txt`
do
    I=`expr $I + $N`
done

echo $I
  • 1
    Command expansion should be used with caution when files can be arbitrarily large. With numbers.txt of 10MB, the cat numbers.txt step would be problematic. – Giacomo Jan 16 '09 at 15:59
  • 1
    Indeed, however (if not for the better solutions found here) I would use this one until I actually encountered that problem. – Francisco Canedo Jan 16 '09 at 22:05

You can using num-utils, although it may be overkill for what you need. This is a set of programs for manipulating numbers in the shell, and can do several nifty things, including of course, adding them up. It's a bit out of date, but they still work and can be useful if you need to do something more.

http://suso.suso.org/programs/num-utils/

  • Example: numsum numbers.txt. – agc Apr 11 '16 at 15:46
  • While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. - From Review – Tom Jowitt Nov 27 '17 at 1:06

I realize this is an old question, but I like this solution enough to share it.

% cat > numbers.txt
1 
2 
3 
4 
5
^D
% cat numbers.txt | perl -lpe '$c+=$_}{$_=$c'
15

If there is interest, I'll explain how it works.

  • 8
    Please don't. We like to pretend that -n and -p are nice semantic things, not just some clever string pasting ;) – hobbs Oct 15 '09 at 0:37
  • 1
    Yes please, do explain :) (I'm not a Perl typea guy.) – Jens Apr 24 '13 at 3:37
  • Try running "perl -MO=Deparse -lpe '$c+=$_}{$_=$c'" and looking at the output, basically -l uses newlines and both input and output separators, and -p prints each line. But in order to do '-p', perl first adds some boiler plate (which -MO=Deparse) will show you, but then it just substitutes and compiles. You can thus cause an extra block to be inserted with the '}{' part and trick it into not printing on each line, but print at the very end. – Nym Jul 8 '13 at 18:52

Pure bash and in a one-liner :-)

$ cat numbers.txt
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10


$ I=0; for N in $(cat numbers.txt); do I=$(($I + $N)); done; echo $I
55

I think AWK is what you are looking for:

awk '{sum+=$1}END{print sum}'

You can use this command either by passing the numbers list through the standard input or by passing the file containing the numbers as a parameter.

Alternative pure Perl, fairly readable, no packages or options required:

perl -e "map {$x += $_} <> and print $x" < infile.txt
  • or a tiny bit shorter: perl -e 'map {$x += $_} <>; print $x' infile.txt – Avi Tevet Jun 5 '15 at 23:18

For Ruby Lovers

ruby -e "puts ARGF.map(&:to_i).inject(&:+)" numbers.txt

My version:

seq -5 10 | xargs printf "- - %s" | xargs  | bc
  • 1
    Shorter: seq -s+ -5 10 | bc – agc Apr 11 '16 at 15:58

You can do it in python, if you feel comfortable:

Not tested, just typed:

out = open("filename").read();
lines = out.split('\n')
ints = map(int, lines)
s = sum(ints)
print s

Sebastian pointed out a one liner script:

cat filename | python -c"from fileinput import input; print sum(map(int, input()))"
  • python -c"from fileinput import input; print sum(map(int, input()))" numbers.txt – jfs Jan 16 '09 at 15:50
  • Or cat numbers.txt | python -c"from ... – jfs Jan 16 '09 at 15:51
  • 1
    cat is overused, redirect stdin from file: python -c "..." < numbers.txt – Giacomo Jan 16 '09 at 16:02
  • 1
    @rjack: cat is used to demonstrate that script works both for stdin and for files in argv[] (like while(<>) in Perl). If your input is in a file then '<' is unnecessary. – jfs Jan 16 '09 at 16:06
  • 1
    But < numbers.txt demonstrates that it works on stdin just as well as cat numbers.txt | does. And it doesn't teach bad habits. – Xiong Chiamiov Jun 18 '13 at 22:39

The following should work (assuming your number is the second field on each line).

awk 'BEGIN {sum=0} \
 {sum=sum + $2} \
END {print "tot:", sum}' Yourinputfile.txt
  • 1
    You don't really need the {sum=0} part – Uphill_ What '1 Oct 11 '11 at 6:19

One-liner in Racket:

racket -e '(define (g) (define i (read)) (if (eof-object? i) empty (cons i (g)))) (foldr + 0 (g))' < numlist.txt

C (not simplified)

seq 1 10 | tcc -run <(cat << EOF
#include <stdio.h>
int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    int sum = 0;
    int i = 0;
    while(scanf("%d", &i) == 1) {
        sum = sum + i;
    }
    printf("%d\n", sum);
    return 0;
}
EOF)
  • 3
    (yeah I got bored and played code golf) – Greg Bowyer Jan 24 '13 at 7:19
$ cat n
2
4
2
7
8
9
$ perl -MList::Util -le 'print List::Util::sum(<>)' < n
32

Or, you can type in the numbers on the command line:

$ perl -MList::Util -le 'print List::Util::sum(<>)'
1
3
5
^D
9

However, this one slurps the file so it is not a good idea to use on large files. See j_random_hacker's answer which avoids slurping.

Real-time summing to let you monitor progress of some number-crunching task.

$ cat numbers.txt 
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

$ cat numbers.txt | while read new; do total=$(($total + $new)); echo $total; done
1
3
6
10
15
21
28
36
45
55

(There is no need to set $total to zero in this case. Neither you can access $total after the finish.)

You can use your preferred 'expr' command you just need to finagle the input a little first:

seq 10 | tr '[\n]' '+' | sed -e 's/+/ + /g' -e's/ + $/\n/' | xargs expr

The process is:

  • "tr" replaces the eoln characters with a + symbol,
  • sed pads the '+' with spaces on each side, and then strips the final + from the line
  • xargs inserts the piped input into the command line for expr to consume.

C++ (simplified):

echo {1..10} | scc 'WRL n+=$0; n'

SCC project - http://volnitsky.com/project/scc/

SCC is C++ snippets evaluator at shell prompt

protected by eyllanesc Apr 16 at 4:47

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