1

Reference image

I have a certain object in my game and I'm trying to see whether the object triggers multiple triggers. I tried with the code bellow but for some reason it doesn't work.

void OnTriggerEnter2D(Collider2D col)
{
    if (col.tag == "speed")
    {
        //do something
    }
    else if (col.tag == "speed" && col.tag == "point")
    {
        //do something
    }
}

How can I recognize if the object only hit "Col1" or "Col1" and "Col2"

7

OnTriggerEnter is only called when your object is colliding with one specific trigger. Thus, the tag of the collider (col) can't be speed and point at the same time.

You have to track if the object is colliding with your triggers using a boolean variable for example :

private bool collidingWithSpeed;
private bool collidingWithPoint;

void OnTriggerEnter2D(Collider2D col)
{
    if (col.CompareTag("speed"))
    {
        collidingWithSpeed = true ;
        //do something
    }
    else if (col.CompareTag("point"))
    {
        collidingWithPoint = true ;
        //do something
    }

    if( collidingWithSpeed && collidingWithPoint )
    {
         // Do something when your object collided with both triggers
    }
}
// Don't forget to set the variables to false when your object exits the triggers!
void OnTriggerExit2D(Collider2D col)
{
    if (col.CompareTag("speed"))
    {
        collidingWithSpeed = false;
    }
    else if (col.CompareTag("point"))
    {
        collidingWithPoint = false;
    }
}
  • Thank you so much :) – John Jul 13 '17 at 14:00
1

While @Hellium's answer would work perfectly, I personally prefer using a list to store all my colliding objects (or at least some of them). Like so

private readonly List<string> collidingTags = new List<string>();

void OnTriggerEnter2D(Collider2D collider)
{
    //Add some kind of filter or safety check if needed
    collidingTags.Add(collider.tag);
}

void OnTriggerExit2D(Collider2D collider)
{
    //Add some kind of safety check if needed
    collidingTags.Remove(collider.tag);
}

In theory, this is far less efficient in terms of performances (compared to storing a bool) but stills, it adds a nice layer of flexibility. In practice, the difference in performances is incredibly small so you decide!

  • Thanks for the answer :) – John Jul 13 '17 at 14:01

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